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June 25, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alex Garcia talks about his life, he absently repeats the words, "I can't believe it." He says it when he talks about his life before--running with a gang, dropping out of school, getting arrested. He says it again when he reflects on his life now, as a Glendale College student earning straight A's. "Every day," he said, "everything gets better." Garcia is the first in his family to go to college.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When scores of Hamilton High School students protested in front of the campus April 16, accusing teachers of racism, it was only the latest turbulent chapter at a school struggling to succeed in a racial divide. For decades, Hamilton has been a beacon of integration, bordered on the east by sizable minority populations and on the west by relatively affluent white communities committed to the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | AGUSTIN GURZA
My son's high school essay made me steam. Even the title smacked of mockery: "Affirmative Action: What Is It Good For?" It seemed to echo the 1960s song that asked the same question about war. But it turned the era's rhetoric against itself. When I read the first paragraph, I was ready to give that little whippersnapper a history lesson. "As an above-average Latino student in a predominantly Caucasian school, affirmative action is a program that would benefit me greatly," wrote Miguel, 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DreamWorks SKG will fund a new program at Los Angeles community colleges aimed at bringing more minorities and low-income people into the entertainment industry, officials said Monday. The program, announced Thursday by DreamWorks SKG co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg and Los Angeles City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter, culminates two years of often-strained negotiations between the studio, city and Los Angeles Community College District.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Offering an early peek at University of California admissions this year, six UC campuses reported Tuesday the number of blacks and Latinos admitted either stabilized or improved from last year's steep drops. The numbers so far, however, reveal little about the long-term impact of ending affirmative action in the state's elite university system.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Amid an overall increase in the number of applicants to University of California campuses, the number of blacks and Latinos applying to UC Berkeley has dropped, according to statistics released Wednesday. Systemwide, more blacks and Latinos are applying to UC campuses, but the drop at Berkeley--10.6% among African American applicants and 12.1% among Latinos--dismayed university officials. "The numbers leave us unequivocally dissatisfied," said Berkeley Vice Chancellor Genaro Padilla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA
The San Fernando Valley Branch of the NAACP will hold two community forums Monday in commemoration of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. Valley NAACP president, the Rev. Zedar E. Broadous, said the events are part of the association's 1999 theme: rekindling the spirit by providing opportunities to discuss important issues affecting San Fernando Valley minority communities. Both forums are free to the public and will be held at Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, 11266 Glenoaks Blvd., Pacoima.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government's largest education grant program, despite spending $118 billion over the last three decades, has been unable to meet its goal of narrowing the achievement gap between rich and poor students, interviews and documents show. Title I, which started with idealistic fervor in the 1960s' War on Poverty, provides $7.4 billion each year to help one of every five pupils in the nation's public schools. Recent evaluations by the U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
University of California regents, who today hold their first meeting in 16 years without a Republican governor, are poised to plunge into two potentially contentious debates--over minority admissions and the university's role in training public school teachers. Gov. Gray Davis has called on the regents to approve a new policy of admitting all students who graduate in the top 4% of their high school classes. That move is almost certain to pass in the next few months.
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