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Minorities Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen-year-old Ashley Atkins moved through the marbled halls of the Great Western Mutual Auditorium south of downtown one night recently with so much grace and cheery confidence that younger girls and boys could not help but stare up at her. She was serving as an advisor to the newest recruits of a local organization that for years has been quietly linking capable minority students with Southern California's most expensive and demanding private elementary and college prep schools.
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NEWS
September 1, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES and RICHARD COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The gap in performance on college entrance exams between whites and ethnic groups widened this year, alarming education advocates who said American schools are failing to provide minority high school students with enough rigorous courses to prepare them for college. Much of the disparity, however, resulted from sharp increases in the number of Latinos and African Americans taking the tests, the College Board reported Tuesday.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | JOHN BALZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vast majority of African American high school students believe that if they work hard, they will have more opportunities, according to a report released Tuesday by a nonprofit educational group. A majority of students surveyed voiced optimism in the old-fashioned ideal that a diligent work ethic reaps success. But the figure was significantly higher among black students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999 | Jill Leovy
Four dozen California colleges have joined a new Washington, D.C.-based public policy alliance aimed at raising the profile of minority colleges. The Alliance for Equity in Higher Education is calling for greater funding for institutions that serve large populations of minority students, and plans to research and publicize the role of such colleges in economic development.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Texas schools have long been known for producing powerhouse prep football teams. But in the past few years the state has received national attention for its academic prowess, most notably for narrowing the persistent gap in test scores between white and minority students. The gains have been attributed to a pioneering accountability and testing system in which schools are labeled exemplary to low-performing based on test scores and attendance rates.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alex Garcia talks about his life, he absently repeats the words, "I can't believe it." He says it when he talks about his life before--running with a gang, dropping out of school, getting arrested. He says it again when he reflects on his life now, as a Glendale College student earning straight A's. "Every day," he said, "everything gets better." Garcia is the first in his family to go to college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When scores of Hamilton High School students protested in front of the campus April 16, accusing teachers of racism, it was only the latest turbulent chapter at a school struggling to succeed in a racial divide. For decades, Hamilton has been a beacon of integration, bordered on the east by sizable minority populations and on the west by relatively affluent white communities committed to the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | AGUSTIN GURZA
My son's high school essay made me steam. Even the title smacked of mockery: "Affirmative Action: What Is It Good For?" It seemed to echo the 1960s song that asked the same question about war. But it turned the era's rhetoric against itself. When I read the first paragraph, I was ready to give that little whippersnapper a history lesson. "As an above-average Latino student in a predominantly Caucasian school, affirmative action is a program that would benefit me greatly," wrote Miguel, 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DreamWorks SKG will fund a new program at Los Angeles community colleges aimed at bringing more minorities and low-income people into the entertainment industry, officials said Monday. The program, announced Thursday by DreamWorks SKG co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg and Los Angeles City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter, culminates two years of often-strained negotiations between the studio, city and Los Angeles Community College District.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Offering an early peek at University of California admissions this year, six UC campuses reported Tuesday the number of admitted blacks and Latinos either stabilized or improved from last year's steep drops. The numbers so far, however, reveal little about the long-term impact of ending affirmative action in the state's elite university system.
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