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Minorities Employment

NEWS
April 15, 1988 | United Press International
Mayor Art Agnos on Thursday named a veteran white firefighter as chief of the racially troubled Fire Department, but he addressed minority concerns by placing a black leader at the helm of a revamped Fire Commission. New Chief Fred Postel, 46, who brought the first women firefighters into the department, will "maintain the superb firefighting department, and open the firehouse doors to women and minorities," Agnos said.
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BUSINESS
March 18, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, TIMES LABOR COLUMNIST
Skilled workers in the construction industry were once referred to as the "aristocrats of labor," so it isn't surprising that in the early part of this century most of them successfully encouraged their children--almost always boys--to learn their trades. The pay was, and still is, relatively good, although the work is often interrupted by everything from bad weather to economic downturns. But construction work, while strenuous, often is more satisfying to people than routine office jobs.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1988 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Southern California's aerospace industry was criticized sharply by a Congressional committee Monday for failing to hire and promote more black and Latino workers. A report issued by the House Education and Labor Committee said the proportion of those two minorities in the industry's work force "remained relatively unchanged or worsened" between 1980 and 1986.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
A Chicago bank accused of job discrimination against women and minority employees has agreed to pay a record $14 million in back wages as restitution for past bias, the Labor Department announced Tuesday. The settlement by the Harris Trust & Savings Bank was the largest such award ever obtained by the federal government in a sex or race discrimination case and ended a 14-year legal struggle with the company.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
As the Watts riot raged along Imperial Highway in 1965, William Thomas watched from his nearby home on Mona Street, where his eight brothers and sisters and his mother lived on welfare. A few years later, a group of well-groomed executives and then-Los Angeles Mayor Sam Yorty showed up one day at a junkyard on Mona, just down the street from the Thomas home, to break ground for a new Lockheed aircraft plant.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Sweatshops continue to exist in the United States, with businesses in the restaurant, apparel manufacturing and meat-processing industries the worst offenders, said a government report released Sunday. The General Accounting Office report said Hispanics and Asians were the ethnic groups most heavily represented among workers in restaurant and apparel sweatshops.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betty A. Sproule's employees at Hewlett-Packard Co. have noticed improvements in her style lately. "I'm making decisions faster," said Sproule, a marketing research manager. "I've been more efficient managing my time." Sproule, 44, credits a new Hewlett-Packard mentoring program, part of an accelerated development effort designed to ensure that women and minorities get the preparation needed to move smoothly into senior-level positions.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Marooned in Washington by a blinding snowstorm, a small group of senior managers from Digital Equipment, a computer manufacturer, spent a long weekend seven years ago breaking a taboo that had sworn American corporations to silence for a generation. They talked about race: the stereotypes whites hold about blacks and Asians and other people who look and act different from the corporate norm. They talked about sex: the difficulty men and women have working together in business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
To David Lee Porter, it seemed like a big break. Maybe it wasn't Johnny Carson, but an appearance on June Cain Miller's TV talk show--even if it airs at 12:30 a.m. on KDOC in Orange County--would give the 24-year-old musician from Fullerton some badly needed exposure. He never imagined that the March 7 episode would be marred by racial comments that recalled Al Campanis' infamous remarks on Ted Koppel's "Nightline" last year.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Avon gambled when it launched "Undeniable" by Billy Dee Williams in 1990. After all, it had never marketed a celebrity fragrance, and many star-endorsed scents had flopped. For Avon--battered by big losses in 1988--the timing was excellent. Undeniable is Avon's top-selling fragrance and the leading U.S. male-celebrity scent for women--surpassing products endorsed by Julio Iglesias, Herb Alpert and Mikhail Baryshnikov.
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