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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1988
While Sunday night's TV production of "Inherit the Wind" was not flattering to creationists, its stand against censorship was not missed by creation scientists, who observe with irony how the tables have turned 63 years after the Scopes trial. Howard Rosenberg and Bart Mills noted this as well ("Still Inheriting the Wind," March 18). It is now the teaching of creation that is banned in public schools.
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WORLD
October 25, 2002 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Many messy sideshows are expected in a war to topple Saddam Hussein, but few will be more dangerous than in the mountains of northern Iraq, where Turkey's national security will collide with Kurdish dreams of a homeland. As diplomats bicker over the language of U.N. resolutions, tensions are hardening along the 220-mile Turkish-Iraqi border. Tents are being shipped in for refugees as the Turkish government prepares for possible deployment of thousands more troops.
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NEWS
July 12, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
The government of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has forcibly moved as many as half a million Kurds and razed an estimated 700 Kurdish towns and villages in a ruthless resettlement program aimed at creating a 14,000-square-mile security zone around Iraq's northern border, U.S. officials said Tuesday. Last month, Iraqi troops leveled the border town of Qala Diza and drove 50,000 Kurds from the strategically vital region that they had inhabited for centuries.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
The government of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has forcibly moved as many as half a million Kurds and razed an estimated 700 Kurdish towns and villages in a ruthless resettlement program aimed at creating a 14,000-square-mile security zone around Iraq's northern border, U.S. officials said Tuesday. Last month, Iraqi troops leveled the border town of Qala Diza and drove 50,000 Kurds from the strategically vital region that they had inhabited for centuries.
WORLD
October 25, 2002 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Many messy sideshows are expected in a war to topple Saddam Hussein, but few will be more dangerous than in the mountains of northern Iraq, where Turkey's national security will collide with Kurdish dreams of a homeland. As diplomats bicker over the language of U.N. resolutions, tensions are hardening along the 220-mile Turkish-Iraqi border. Tents are being shipped in for refugees as the Turkish government prepares for possible deployment of thousands more troops.
WORLD
May 11, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
Pope Benedict XVI told about 20,000 followers in an open air Mass on Sunday that Christians in the Middle East are "deeply touched by difficulties and uncertainties" but that they must be strong in their faith to counter religious extremism. The pope's message on the final day of his pilgrimage to Jordan was for Christians to persevere as their populations decline in a Middle East that offers limited economic opportunity and is torn by violence and radicalism.
OPINION
September 14, 2003 | Said Aburish, Said Aburish is a journalist and author of, among other books, "A Brutal Friendship: The West and the Arab Elite."
A proud, often-conquered people still hoping for a national homeland, the Kurds are once again emerging as a major factor in America's vague plans to reshape Iraq and create a new political balance in the Middle East. For centuries, Iraqi Kurds -- now numbering about 5 million -- have wanted to control their fate. In the years since the 1991 Persian Gulf War, they came close to that goal, living in autonomous zones within Iraq and shielded by U.S. might from Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | SALAH NASRAWI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Grim-faced, the teen-age boys squatted around a Kurdish guerrilla showing them how to strip and assemble a machine gun. Soon, they would be using the weapon in a conflict that is almost 70 years old--the Kurds' fight for an independent homeland in Iran. The Iraqi-backed Kurdish Democratic Party of Iran has in recent weeks stepped up its attacks on Iranian military bases and economic targets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1998 | JOHN TIRMAN, John Tirman, executive director of the Winston Foundation for World Peace in Washington, is author of "Spoils of War: The Human Cost of America's Arms Trade" (Free Press, 1997)
Another showdown with Iraq is imminent. This time, a radical new approach--direct engagement with Saddam Hussein--is needed to reshape political demands and expectations. Predictably, Saddam and his minions are trying to disrupt the U.N. inspection of Iraq's weapons-making facilities. Iraq says enough is enough and wants the broad sanctions imposed after the 1991 war lifted. The U.N.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been updated. See below for details.
HUNTSVILLE, Texas -- A Texas district judge on Tuesday postponed the execution of a female inmate hours before she would have been the first woman put to death in the United States in more than two years. Kimberly McCarthy, 51, was scheduled to be executed by lethal injection for stabbing her elderly neighbor to death in 1997. State District Judge Larry Mitchell postponed McCarthy's execution until April 3 after her lawyer successfully appealed for a delay, arguing the jury that convicted McCarthy of murder was improperly selected on the basis of race, according to court records . McCarthy is African American and the Dallas-area jury that convicted her included one African American and 11 whites, according to Dallas County Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1988
While Sunday night's TV production of "Inherit the Wind" was not flattering to creationists, its stand against censorship was not missed by creation scientists, who observe with irony how the tables have turned 63 years after the Scopes trial. Howard Rosenberg and Bart Mills noted this as well ("Still Inheriting the Wind," March 18). It is now the teaching of creation that is banned in public schools.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-British bombing of Iraq last month may have killed several top Iraqi government figures, Pentagon officials said Friday as they ordered more warplanes to the Persian Gulf to meet a growing threat from what they called a "shaken" and "desperate" President Saddam Hussein. Gen. Henry H. Shelton, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the bombing hit "several key individuals in the upper structure" of Hussein's regime. In a separate briefing, Marine Gen. Anthony Zinni, the U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pride in the Persian Gulf War victory still runs deep in the American military, but last year's spirit of triumph has given way to a pervasive anxiety about the future. The generals, captains and sergeants who assembled the force that crushed the Iraqi army are now engaged in the woeful task of dismantling it, although many consider it the finest army ever fielded.
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