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NEWS
May 12, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before a massive nighttime raid on two suspected "crack houses" in 1988, Los Angeles police officers talked strategy. Capt. Thomas Elfmont told his troops he wanted the places "hit hard"--so hard, according to one officer in attendance, that Elfmont promised the officers "100%" backing even if they shot someone. "He said that (such a) shooting wouldn't be as scrutinized . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley hired the highest-ranked black official in San Diego County and a prominent Los Angeles arts figure for top city jobs Wednesday, filling vacancies left when two of his most controversial appointees departed City Hall in a hurry. In also elevating veteran Los Angeles city officials to three other top jobs, Bradley rejected pleas from Latino leaders for at least two appointments and a bigger share of the plum jobs in city government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an era where clubs dominated by white males are increasingly under legal and political attack, a new upstart in downtown Los Angeles touts itself as a little United Nations among private clubs. The newcomer is City Club of Bunker Hill, housed on the 54th and highest floor of Wells Fargo Center on Bunker Hill.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dusk falls differently on Los Angeles' impoverished and crime-scarred neighborhoods. In the ghettos and barrios, twilight is a time zone all its own, when the day's hustles and confrontations continue apace, but with all eyes cocked toward night. As daylight pales, Central American mothers who use MacArthur Park for daily strolls gather their children before the Wilshire District park and its surrounding streets are overrun by night predators.
MAGAZINE
January 17, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, Lynell George is a staff writer for L.A. Weekly. Her collection of essays and reportage, "No Crystal Stair: African-Americans in the City of Angels," was published in December by Verso
Let's call him "Perry." * If you grew up in Los Angeles (back when it was still hip to dub the mix "melting pot") and sat through a homeroom roll call sandwiching you somewhere between a Martinez, Masjedi, Matsuda and Meizel, you knew one--but more than likely two. This Culver City "Perry," a classmate of mine, had Farrah Fawcett-feathered blond hair, moist blue-gray eyes and a Tiger Beat dimple in his chin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new study commissioned by a business group and conducted by a respected voting rights expert has concluded that boosting the size of Los Angeles' City Council as part of a reformed charter would expand minority representation in city government and could avoid a showdown in areas where Latinos and African Americans are vying for power. "A larger City Council . . . will allow for greater representation of minority communities of interest," the study written by Richard P. Fajardo concluded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charging that the Los Angeles City Fire Department is plagued by racism and discrimination, the organization representing African American firefighters called Friday for the mayor to appoint a black fire commissioner and for department officials to implement reforms in the 3,100-member force.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xavier Flores has heard the claims that if the San Fernando Valley secedes from the city of Los Angeles, it will give local residents more control over their political destiny. That may sound appealing, particularly for Latinos and other minorities in the Valley who feel they are often ignored. But Flores, who heads the Valley chapter of the Mexican-American Political Assn., is staying clear of the secession movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
When Tom Bradley was first elected mayor in 1973, his campaign was powered by South-Central Los Angeles blacks and Westside and San Fernando Valley Jews. Early in the campaign, these two groups, brought together by a common concern over civil rights, realized that they didn't have enough votes to win. So they expanded their base. Homeowner groups, angry over development, joined. Latino leaders signed up, too, hoping for more of a voice in City Hall. This is called coalition politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Top administrators of the Los Angeles Unified School District will get no pay Raises this year, the Board of Education decided Monday night in beginning a series of votes designed to tighten the district's budget. Even as the board grappled with closing an unprecedented $220-million budget shortage, a private consultant told board members that, to keep the nation's second-largest school district from going bankrupt, they will have to make even more painful cuts soon.
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