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SPORTS
December 21, 1992 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barry Harper had never poked his toe in a mountain stream, never seen a deer in the wild, never stared down a snake that was not under glass. When you come across a squirrel back home in Inglewood, he says, odds are someone shoots it. Now, Harper walks in the solitude of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, surrounded by autumn leaves and the scattered sons of wealthy white Southerners, to wonder how on earth a 6-foot-2 black teen-ager from Los Angeles ended up in this neck of the woods.
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NEWS
May 19, 1991 | TED ROHRLICH and VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Blacks who filed excessive-force complaints against Los Angeles police officers were more likely--by a narrow margin--to have their complaints upheld by the department than Anglos or Latinos. But when blacks complained about other forms of police misconduct--ranging from improper tactics to verbal abuse--their complaints were more likely to be turned down.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before a massive nighttime raid on two suspected "crack houses" in 1988, Los Angeles police officers talked strategy. Capt. Thomas Elfmont told his troops he wanted the places "hit hard"--so hard, according to one officer in attendance, that Elfmont promised the officers "100%" backing even if they shot someone. "He said that (such a) shooting wouldn't be as scrutinized . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley hired the highest-ranked black official in San Diego County and a prominent Los Angeles arts figure for top city jobs Wednesday, filling vacancies left when two of his most controversial appointees departed City Hall in a hurry. In also elevating veteran Los Angeles city officials to three other top jobs, Bradley rejected pleas from Latino leaders for at least two appointments and a bigger share of the plum jobs in city government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an era where clubs dominated by white males are increasingly under legal and political attack, a new upstart in downtown Los Angeles touts itself as a little United Nations among private clubs. The newcomer is City Club of Bunker Hill, housed on the 54th and highest floor of Wells Fargo Center on Bunker Hill.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dusk falls differently on Los Angeles' impoverished and crime-scarred neighborhoods. In the ghettos and barrios, twilight is a time zone all its own, when the day's hustles and confrontations continue apace, but with all eyes cocked toward night. As daylight pales, Central American mothers who use MacArthur Park for daily strolls gather their children before the Wilshire District park and its surrounding streets are overrun by night predators.
MAGAZINE
January 17, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, Lynell George is a staff writer for L.A. Weekly. Her collection of essays and reportage, "No Crystal Stair: African-Americans in the City of Angels," was published in December by Verso
Let's call him "Perry." * If you grew up in Los Angeles (back when it was still hip to dub the mix "melting pot") and sat through a homeroom roll call sandwiching you somewhere between a Martinez, Masjedi, Matsuda and Meizel, you knew one--but more than likely two. This Culver City "Perry," a classmate of mine, had Farrah Fawcett-feathered blond hair, moist blue-gray eyes and a Tiger Beat dimple in his chin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Radio ads will begin pitching the RTD's "free-sample" bus ride program today, a five-month, high-stakes gamble that officials hope will pull up sagging ridership and provide a badly needed increase in fare-box revenue. In one of the largest such promotional programs ever attempted, RTD officials plan to distribute more than 1.3 million free bus tokens in minority communities where the RTD sees the most potential for attracting new, regular riders.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
After months of political debate, a court challenge and charges that it was "promoting" homosexual activity, a split Board of Supervisors on Tuesday awarded a $20,000 contract to a South-Central Los Angeles firm to provide AIDS education to the county's black and Latino communities. Minority AIDS Project won the grant after withstanding opposition by two supervisors and numerous community activists.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Soon after the Koreana Co. of South Korea bought the former Hyatt Wilshire Hotel last year, 150 union-represented workers were fired in what federal labor officials called an attempt to bust their union. The union representing the mostly Latino workers was primed to fight back, but the problem was, "How can we keep this from being Korean-bashing?" said Jennifer Skurnik, campaign coordinator for the Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union Local 11.
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