Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMinorities Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Minorities Los Angeles

NEWS
October 5, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xavier Flores has heard the claims that if the San Fernando Valley secedes from the city of Los Angeles, it will give local residents more control over their political destiny. That may sound appealing, particularly for Latinos and other minorities in the Valley who feel they are often ignored. But Flores, who heads the Valley chapter of the Mexican-American Political Assn., is staying clear of the secession movement.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
When Tom Bradley was first elected mayor in 1973, his campaign was powered by South-Central Los Angeles blacks and Westside and San Fernando Valley Jews. Early in the campaign, these two groups, brought together by a common concern over civil rights, realized that they didn't have enough votes to win. So they expanded their base. Homeowner groups, angry over development, joined. Latino leaders signed up, too, hoping for more of a voice in City Hall. This is called coalition politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Top administrators of the Los Angeles Unified School District will get no pay Raises this year, the Board of Education decided Monday night in beginning a series of votes designed to tighten the district's budget. Even as the board grappled with closing an unprecedented $220-million budget shortage, a private consultant told board members that, to keep the nation's second-largest school district from going bankrupt, they will have to make even more painful cuts soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1990 | BILL BOYARSKY
The typical patient at the Minority AIDS Project is gay, poor and black, under 40, estranged from his family and addicted to drugs. If he isn't already overcome with the symptoms of AIDS, he's just been hit with the realization that he has the disease and will die from it. Dealing with complex cases such as his require medical technology, drug treatment, home care and financial and psychological support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Reed V. Tuckson, the outspoken former commissioner of public health for Washington, D.C., and an advocate for improved health care for the disadvantaged, has tentatively agreed to become president of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Watts.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | TIM RUTTEN
There is a convenience store not far from our house that usually lives up to its name. It's a handy place for picking up cold drinks or the odd item forgotten during regular shopping. This week was an exception. When I stopped in Monday morning, people were three deep at the counter. Others were standing in the aisles filling out small slips of paper.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying minorities are not getting a fair share of home loans, Mayor Tom Bradley on Thursday unveiled a proposed ordinance requiring that banks and thrifts disclose their lending practices--and directing Los Angeles agencies to rank banks that compete for city deposits. The announcement coincided with the release of a city-commissioned survey that revealed disparities in the number of home purchase and improvement loans in minority and non-minority neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1988
Los Angeles County transit officials and Mayor Tom Bradley are scheduled to sign an agreement Monday creating a special $15-million fund designed to help more minority businesses get in on the region's growing number of mass-transit construction contracts. Small minority businesses often have difficulty getting bonded by financial institutions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
A state Supreme Court member Monday heatedly criticized a novel trial court order requiring Los Angeles County officials to deputize thousands of county employees to register low-income and minority voters. "Who elected the trial judge in this case (to act) as the Board of Supervisors?" asked Justice Marcus M. Kaufman, his voice booming through the courtroom as he fired questions at a lawyer for civil rights groups defending the order in a hearing before the justices.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|