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BOOKS
July 30, 1995
Thank you for John Balzar's understanding and insightful review of John Hockenberry's "Moving Violations" on the cover of today's Book Review section. But as a long-time wheelchair user myself, I was somewhat put off by the review's title, "A Minority of One." Fact is, the U.S. government estimates some 49 million Americans have a disability--making us the single largest minority group in the country! Ironically, Balzar astutely points out: "Hockenberry tells an intimate, personal story about a minority group for which each of us remains fully eligible."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996
I would like to add an anecdote to Adrienne Mack's insightful article on LAUSD's awful hiring practices ("When Experience Doesn't Pay," July 21). During spring of 1995, my school, Cleveland Humanities Magnet, tried to hire one of Mack's esteemed Birmingham compatriots. She was a quality teacher, experienced in teaching mathematics, well credentialed and also an Academic Decathlon coach. In addition, she was Irani. We at Cleveland have a growing Irani student population, and we had absolutely no Irani teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1988
Your editorial ("Minorities Need More Help to Make the Grade," Dec. 20) was right on target in stating that although many Latino, black and Asian students from kindergarten to college do well in Orange County, a significant number have problems that should be of major concern to the entire country. I am pleased that the editorial acknowledged a recently completed research survey on the needs of the Vietnamese students at Cal State Fullerton. The university initiated the survey two years ago as one means of improving service to these students, who make up the largest foreign nationality group on our campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990
The effort by The Times and other major metropolitan dailies to hire more minorities is a good one. An even better goal is for dailies to provide the type of service to readers and advertisers needed in the African-American and Latino communities. The newspaper industry goal to have news staffs reflect the African-American and Latino percentages in the population within the next decade is hypocritical. Editorial staffs are under pressure to recruit more minority reporters and editors, while advertising and circulation staffs are under the gun to capture the so-called "upscale" market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1999
Re "National Parks Hope to Attract More Minority Visitors," Jan. 17: Just how does this work? First you double the entrance fee to $20. Next you have a study and find that those in the lower-income groups are not flocking into the park and availing themselves of the campgrounds that have been removed to eliminate the "huge crowds." Now park administrators have yet another project they can work on. Anyone like to attend the endless hearings? RICHARD B. PRIDHAM Downey I always thought the relevance of national parks is their ability to provide settings of natural beauty or historical interest for all who choose to visit them.
NATIONAL
December 12, 2009 | By Richard Simon
With her party firmly in power, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) didn't think enough attention was being paid to the economic troubles of minorities. So she did what she's often done during her long political career: She got in her colleagues' faces. Waters recently led a boycott by black lawmakers of a House committee vote on a Wall Street regulatory overhaul bill -- a priority of President Obama's. "They got the message," Waters said. The bill, approved by the House on Friday with Waters' support, included a number of measures she had sought: $3 billion in low-interest loans for unemployed homeowners facing foreclosure, $1 billion to help communities hit hard by foreclosures buy and renovate abandoned properties, and a provision to create an "office of minority and women inclusion" at the Treasury Department and other federal agencies.
OPINION
September 7, 2006
Re "New Version of SAT Brings Lower Scores in U.S., California," Aug. 30 You omit some facts. First, the University of California system in 2001 threatened to abandon the SAT. It is widely acknowledged that this threat alone precipitated the revision of the SAT to the new format -- one for which the written section scoring rubric is arguably both arbitrary and poorly administered. Second, at UCLA, African American and other minority application and enrollment rates for this fall are at lows not seen since the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
Publicly funded AIDS services in Los Angeles County remain disproportionately concentrated in Anglo communities despite the steady spread of the disease among blacks, Latinos and Asians, two county advisory boards reported Tuesday. The Human Relations Commission and the Commission on AIDS called on the Board of Supervisors and Department of Health Services to decentralize their AIDS programs in order to better serve the minority and lower-income neighborhoods that increasingly need them most.
OPINION
June 29, 2002
In "Letting Women Athletes Soar" (Commentary, June 23), Jackie Joyner-Kersee makes the typical argument in defense of Title IX: It was needed and it worked, so it will always be needed and will always work. She trivializes the fact that the women's Title IX enforcement brigade has forced the use of quotas through bullying litigation despite the fact that the law might provide for other ways to satisfy Title IX participation tests. In the face of litigation, college (and now high school)
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