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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The state Senate on Thursday approved a bill that would reduce the maximum possible misdemeanor sentence from one year to 364 days,  to reduce deportations of legal residents for minor crimes. The bill addresses concern that federal law allows legal immigrants to be deported if they are convicted of a crime and given a one-year sentence. Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said his bill would prevent families from being torn apart if one member commits a crime that is not a felony, such as writing a bad check.
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SPORTS
April 1, 2014 | By David Wharton
African sports officials have banned Lee Evans, an American gold medalist and Fulbright scholar, from coaching for four years after he allegedly gave performance-enhancing drugs to a young athlete. The penalty was announced Tuesday by the Athletics Federation of Nigeria , which also issued a lifetime ban for the young woman's coach, Abass Rauf. Officials became aware of the situation after the athlete - a minor who was not named - failed a urine test. Evans acknowledged supplying the girl with supplements, amino acid and a sport drink while working as a consultant in Lagos in early 2013. He said he did not think anything he gave her contained banned substances.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Congress recognized 40 years ago that it was counterproductive and just plain wrong to incarcerate juveniles for trivial misbehavior such as truancy, breaking curfew, smoking or drinking. These acts, known as status offenses, are illegal only because the person committing them is a minor. Federal law passed at that time prohibited states from locking away most status offenders, but in 1980 the law was amended to allow incarceration when a court order had been violated. In other words, if a truant teenager was ordered by a court to attend school, and then cut class, incarceration was allowed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A large aftershock Saturday afternoon caused minor damage but unnerved some Fullerton residents already jittery from the previous night's 5.1 temblor. The 4.1-magnitude quake occurred at 2:32 p.m. in Rowland Heights, about five miles from Friday's epicenter. Twitter users as far as East Los Angeles reported feeling it. The shaking, which residents described as a rolling rumble, caused at least two water main breaks in Fullerton, leaving some residents without water while city crews scrambled to the scene, said Fullerton Police Lieut.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke and Rong-Gong Lin II
A magnitude 5.1 earthquake was reported Friday evening one mile from La Habra, California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 9:09 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 0.6 miles. 11:50 p.m. USGS scientist Lucy Jones' advice for Friday night: “Don't put your child to bed under a tall bookcase that could fall over him tonight. " Updated at 11:30 p.m. Fullerton police say the corner of Rosecrans and Gilbert avenues is closed because of a water main break.
SCIENCE
March 24, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
You need a biopsy, or some other kind of minimally invasive treatment, and you are feeling anxious. Nothing is likely to go wrong, but you're still worried.  Would pre-procedure hypnosis help? Maybe. Soft music? Possibly. But a small study presented Monday at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 39th annual meeting, suggests that donning a pair of video glasses that displays a movie or television show only you can see is likely to help you the most.  "Whether they were watching a children's movie or nature show, patients wearing video glasses were successful at tuning out their surroundings," said David L. Waldman, chairman of the department of imaging sciences at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y., and lead author of the study.
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
SURPRISE, Ariz. - For Mike Scioscia , one question was enough. The Angels had just traded his son, in a headline-grabbing deal. They sent Matt Scioscia to the Chicago Cubs for Trevor Gretzky , son of Wayne Gretzky, the greatest player in hockey history. Scioscia offered a brief reaction to the trade on Thursday, after the Angels' 3-2 victory over the Kansas City Royals. "It's part of baseball," Scioscia said. "It's a good opportunity for Matt. " Scioscia cut off a follow-up question, about whether General Manager Jerry Dipoto had discussed the trade with the manager or simply informed him after its completion.
OPINION
March 14, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Until about three years ago, federal agents annually intercepted some 8,000 unaccompanied minors entering the United States illegally. By last year, the number had jumped to nearly 26,000. This year's projection: As many as 60,000 youngsters may attempt to cross into this country without parents or papers. This surge of under-age humanity presents two problems. First is understanding the forces propelling it, which experts say include narco-trafficking, Central American gang violence and abusive homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Jason Wells
No injuries were reported Friday morning after a small landslide was triggered at a residential construction site in Silver Lake. The cascade of dirt occurred on a barren, three-home hillside lot in the 1400 block of North Occidental Boulevard at about 8 a.m., according to the Los Angeles Fire Department. None of the multi-story homes was affected by the flow of dirt, which partially came down onto the street below. Six fire engines were sent to the scene. Aerial television news footage showed construction workers assessing damage to the hillside as a small Bobcat-type excavator worked to dig out the dirt.
WORLD
March 13, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - At least four people were reported dead after knife-wielding assailants stabbed and slashed passers-by Friday morning in Changsha, in China's south-central Hunan province. Witnesses described the assailants as Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking minority from northwestern China's Xinjiang region. Militants from that region were implicated in a knifing rampage March 1 that left 33 people dead at a train station in Kunming, China. 12:15 a.m. update: The death toll from Friday's knife attack in Changsha has reached six. Initial witness reports indicated that members of a Turkic minority from northwestern China could have been involved.
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