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SPORTS
March 11, 2014 | By Helene Elliott
NHL general managers, meeting Tuesday in Florida, agreed to formally recommend three minor changes to the league's competition committee for consideration at its next meeting, in June. Although the general managers couldn't reach agreement on changing the length or general format of regular-season overtime - or on expanding the use of video replay - they decided to recommend three tweaks to existing rules. First, they will recommend that the hash marks on the faceoff circle be separated by two more feet, or from three feet to five feet, to create more separation between players on the wings.
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OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Myanmar, the country formerly known as Burma, has made substantial progress in the last few years, moving from military rule toward democracy, releasing political prisoners and freeing from house arrest Nobel Prize-winning democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi. However, the government has relentlessly continued its appalling treatment of the Rohingya population that lives in Rakhine state in western Myanmar. A Muslim minority in an overwhelmingly Buddhist country, the Rohingya are effectively denied citizenship unless they can meet onerous requirements, such as tracing their lineage back decades.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
OXON HILL, Md. - After steep losses in the 2012 election, there was broad agreement within the Republican Party that its biggest challenge was bridging the divide with key voter groups - minorities, women and young voters - who threw their support behind President Obama, giving him the crucial margin in battleground states. But a year after the GOP's so-called autopsy report, the speeches from the party's leading voices at the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, reflected a complex reality: Republicans are still searching for a unified message to reach those groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO--Assemblyman Steven Bradford (D-Gardena) was at the White House on Thursday for the unveiling of President Obama's new program to help young men of color. The initiative, called "My Brother's Keeper," brings together government agencies, philanthropic foundations and businesses to improve the lives of young black and Latino men, in an aim to stop the "school-to-prison pipeline. " Bradford chairs the Assembly Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color, which has examined disparities in health, economic opportunity and education for minorities.  "History shows how the justice system and the educational system has challenged both boys and men of color," Bradford said in an interview.  Bradford said he looked forward to sharing his input for the national initiative and that wants to see an action plan -- "not just talk" -- and federal resources devoted to improving opportunities for minority youth.
SPORTS
February 24, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
The Philadelphia Phillies' triple-A affiliate out of Allentown already has an unusual name: the Lehigh Valley IronPigs. Now they're going for an unusual marketing tool, at least for a baseball team: Bacon! That's right. The team, whose name is takeoff on a crude iron used in producing steel, has unveiled its 2014 uniforms, and for Saturday home games it's bacon all the way. Bacon on the caps. A wavy bacon underline beneath the moniker 'Pigs across the chest of the jersey.
SPORTS
February 22, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
The Galaxy's present met its future Saturday at the StubHub Center. And it was likely the future of Major League Soccer that was on display as well. On one side were Robbie Keane, Omar Gonzalez and Landon Donovan, guys you've probably heard of. Let's call them Galaxy I. On the other side - we'll call them Galaxy II - were Travis Bowen, Raul Mendiola and Cody Laurendi, guys you probably haven't heard of. But the organization is hoping those will soon be household names as well, which is why it founded a USL Pro team, basically a minor league affiliate, for whom they can play and train.
SPORTS
February 20, 2014 | By Ben Bolch and Broderick Turner
The Clippers made a pair of minor trades shortly before Thursday's deadline, dealing veteran forward Antawn Jamison to the Atlanta Hawks and reserve center Byron Mullens to the Philadelphia 76ers in moves that brought them closer to the luxury tax threshold while opening a pair of roster spots. They traded Jamison and an undisclosed sum of cash to Atlanta for the rights to Cenk Akyol, a 6-foot-7 forward who was the Hawks' second-round draft pick in 2005 but has never appeared in the NBA and now plays in Turkey.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Arriving less than a week after the high-profile death of Pentecostal pastor and reality-show star Jamie Coots by snakebite, the religious thriller "Holy Ghost People" is well poised to exploit fears of an already misunderstood spiritual minority. "Holy Ghost People" takes its name from a 1967 documentary by Peter Adair that captures the soul of a politically progressive West Virginia congregation that handles snakes and speaks in tongues. Director Mitchell Altieri's disappointing feature makes nasty beasts of the very people Adair strived to humanize, portraying them as violent, intolerant hicks straight out of central casting.
SPORTS
February 20, 2014 | By Broderick Turner and Ben Bolch
The Clippers made a pair of minor trades shortly before Thursday's deadline, dealing veteran forward Antawn Jamison to the Atlanta Hawks and reserve center Byron Mullens to the Philadelphia 76ers in moves that brought them closer to the luxury tax threshold while opening up a pair of roster spots. The Clippers traded Jamison,  and an undisclosed sum of cash to Atlanta for the rights to Cenk Akyol, a 6-foot-7 forward who was the Hawks' second-round draft pick in 2005 but has never appeared in the NBA and now plays in the Turkish Basketball League.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Karolina Waclawiak
In the story collection "Karate Chop," Dorthe Nors illuminates an ominous world of disconnected people trying to make sense of their dislocation. Among these micro-transmissions of self-preservation is the standout, "The Wadden Sea," in which a young girl takes off to a remote seaside town with her depressed mother. When the young narrator's grandmother comes to rescue them both, the young girl says, "I could tell she knew fear of life, and I could tell she knew it was a kind of fear that took in the whole of people's lives and could make them forsaken wherever in the world.
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