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Miramax Films

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BUSINESS
October 3, 2009 | Claudia Eller
Walt Disney Co., looking to rein in costs at its Hollywood studio as it focuses on mainstream movies, is slashing staff by 70% at its Miramax Films specialty label and is substantially reducing the number of pictures it releases. The retrenchment, which has been foreshadowed in Disney Chief Executive Robert Iger's strategy to emphasize family and "branded" films, comes quickly on the heels of the recent ouster of former Disney Studios Chairman Dick Cook. The former movie chief left abruptly last month under pressure from Iger, who had been unhappy with the studio's direction and performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Harvey and Bob Weinstein are getting the reunion they've long sought. The brothers' film company, Weinstein Co., has struck a production and distribution deal with Miramax, the iconic firm they founded in 1979 that has been responsible for critical and commercial hits including "Pulp Fiction," "Shakespeare in Love" and "Chicago. " Under terms of the 20-year co-production and co-distribution agreement, the companies will collaborate on a variety of projects that mine Miramax's film library, in addition to developing new content.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Miramax Films has signed a multiyear agreement worth at least $100 million to make its movies available on Netflix's online streaming service. The newly independent studio decided to forego a potentially larger payment from Netflix in order to keep the distribution deal non-exclusive. That will allow Miramax to offer its films on other digital platforms as well, according to a knowledgeable person who asked not to be identified because the deal terms are confidential. Miramax has been having such discussions with Google, Hulu, Amazon.com and other online distributors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Weinstein Co. and Cary Woods Pictures, which worked together on "Swinger" and "Scream," are looking to re-create past success.  TWC is partnering with Woods on an exclusive first-look production deal, the companies said Monday. The team collaborated in the past on seven Miramax films, including "Scream," "Swingers" and "Citizen Ruth," all three of which came out in 1996. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll “We discovered a rare chemistry on the first films we made together, and I look forward to doing it all over again,” Woods and in a statement.  Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who founded Miramax Films in 1979, launched TWC in 2005.  Woods has produced 19 movies, including "Cop Land" and "Gummo.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Claudia Eller
Walt Disney Co. is attempting to learn whether it can still mine gold from Academy Award winners such as "Shakespeare in Love" and "The English Patient" from its Miramax Films unit. The Burbank studio had barely closed the New York and Los Angeles offices of its specialty film label and laid off dozens of employees last week when news surfaced that Miramax was in play. But as Disney entertains inquiries from possible buyers, people close to the situation say that the $700-million price that Disney places on the asset could be a stretch.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Harvey and Bob Weinstein are getting the reunion they've long sought. The brothers' film company, Weinstein Co., has struck a production and distribution deal with Miramax, the iconic firm they founded in 1979 that has been responsible for critical and commercial hits including "Pulp Fiction," "Shakespeare in Love" and "Chicago. " Under terms of the 20-year co-production and co-distribution agreement, the companies will collaborate on a variety of projects that mine Miramax's film library, in addition to developing new content.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2010 | By Claudia Eller
With the recent demise of Miramax Films and its possible sale, the specialty label's biggest movie producer, Scott Rudin, is negotiating to end his lucrative production deal with the company's corporate parent, Walt Disney Studios. A prolific producer who supplied Miramax with such movies as Oscar-winner "No Country for Old Men," "The Queen," and "There Will Be Blood," Rudin is in talks to get out of his contract, which still has three years remaining, said a person familiar with the situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Dawn C. Chmielewski
Walt Disney Co. has received three bids for the specialty label Miramax Films, said people close to the situation who did not want to be identified because the offers were confidential, and now has to make a decision whether to sell the asset or hold on to it. If Disney ends up selling Miramax, it would mark the end of the studio's 17-year ownership of the label, known for championing independent films that often garnered awards on the film festival...
BUSINESS
May 22, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Ben Fritz, Times Staff Writers
Harvey and Bob Weinstein's bid to reclaim Miramax Films, the pioneering independent studio they founded in 1979, has been thwarted at the last minute. In a major blow to the brothers, whose own movie studio Weinstein Co. is facing financial problems, their negotiations with Miramax owner Walt Disney Co. broke down Friday, the same day that the Burbank media giant hoped final deal points would be worked out and long-running talks would come to a conclusion, according to three people familiar with the situation.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
After months of negotiations with various buyers that failed to bear fruit, Walt Disney Co. finally reached a deal to sell its Miramax Films unit in a deal that severs the independent movie pioneer's 17-year association with the Burbank studio. Disney late Thursday signed a definitive agreement to sell Miramax to Filmyard Holding, an investor group led by Los Angeles construction magnate Ron Tutor, for more than $660 million, putting the future of the company with a long string of award-winning films into the hands of a Hollywood outsider.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
For the second year in a row, Harvey and Bob Weinstein have come away from the Oscars with a cart full of statues. But this year's movies didn't put as much gold into the independent studio's coffers. "The Artist," which won five Oscars, including best picture, has grossed $31.9 million in the U.S. and Canada, and "The Iron Lady" and "My Week With Marilyn" collected $25.7 million and $14.1 million, respectively. Added together, that's less money than the $136 million - $114 million of that before it won its big prize - made by last year's Weinstein Co. best picture winner, "The King's Speech.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Miramax Films has signed a digital distribution agreement with online video distributor Hulu as part of an ongoing effort to generate more revenue from its library of more than 700 films. Subscribers to Hulu's premium service Hulu Plus, which costs $7.99 a month, will get access to hundreds of Miramax titles that will be added over the next few months. "Pulp Fiction" and 26 others were the first to be made available for streaming Wednesday. Miramax announced a similar deal last month to put its films on Netflix's Internet streaming service.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Miramax Films has signed a multiyear agreement worth at least $100 million to make its movies available on Netflix's online streaming service. The newly independent studio decided to forego a potentially larger payment from Netflix in order to keep the distribution deal non-exclusive. That will allow Miramax to offer its films on other digital platforms as well, according to a knowledgeable person who asked not to be identified because the deal terms are confidential. Miramax has been having such discussions with Google, Hulu, Amazon.com and other online distributors.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Bob and Harvey Weinstein are back in business with Miramax Films. The independent film-mogul brothers, who this year lost out on a bid to buy back from Walt Disney Co. the specialty label they founded, have signed a deal to partner with the new owners of Miramax to produce sequels and spin-offs to 10 movies that they made in the 1990s and early 2000s. Initially, Weinstein Co. expects to produce new installments of the Oscar-winning romantic comedy "Shakespeare in Love," the dark comedy "Bad Santa" and the 2005 remake of "The Amityville Horror.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
With the sale of Miramax Films completed, the future of the pioneering independent studio will be a test of one of Hollywood's newest sources of money: Colony Capital. Since the 19-year-old Santa Monica investment firm joined in late June with construction magnate Ron Tutor to bid for Miramax, Colony has taken the lead in shaping the acquisition, raising money and charting a new course for the studio. The $663-million deal's lead investor was the Qatar government's sovereign wealth fund, which was recruited by Colony founder and Chief Executive Tom Barrack.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Meet Hollywood's latest reboot: Bob and Harvey Weinstein. The brothers from Queens are seeking to reclaim their mantle as the impresarios of the independent movie scene they helped pioneer, after squandering a similar opportunity over the last five years. Since receiving a financial lifeline over the summer that pulled their New York-based studio back from the brink, the Weinsteins have hit the reset button on the 5-year-old venture they launched after their split from corporate parent Walt Disney Co. Under new financial restraints, they're rebuilding the staff they had to slash and investing in movies that reflect the creative and commercial sensibilities that made them Hollywood mavericks when they ran Miramax Films.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Walt Disney Co. as expected named Daniel Battsek as president of its Miramax Film Corp. unit. Battsek had been executive vice president and managing director of distribution and production for Buena Vista International UK. He will report to Dick Cook, chairman of Walt Disney Studios. Battsek will take over all Miramax operations Oct. 1 with the formal departure of founders Bob and Harvey Weinstein. He is relocating to New York from Britain.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Walt Disney Co.'s Miramax Film Corp. announced Thursday that it was laying off 55 workers, three months after trimming nearly 20% of its workforce. This latest round of job cuts, most of which will be at Miramax's New York headquarters, will result in an additional 13% reduction, with 365 employees remaining. Miramax said the cuts would affect mid-level executives and support staff.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2010 | By Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Morgan Creek Productions founder James Robinson, who had been in negotiations to become a major investor in the acquisition of Miramax Films along with construction magnate Ron Tutor and Los Angeles private equity firm Colony Capital, is no longer part of the mix. Robinson was prepared to put up $75 million to $100 million of the $660-million purchase price for Miramax, for which the Tutor and Colony-led investor group Filmyard Holding signed a...
BUSINESS
July 30, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
After months of negotiations with various buyers that failed to bear fruit, Walt Disney Co. finally reached a deal to sell its Miramax Films unit in a deal that severs the independent movie pioneer's 17-year association with the Burbank studio. Disney late Thursday signed a definitive agreement to sell Miramax to Filmyard Holding, an investor group led by Los Angeles construction magnate Ron Tutor, for more than $660 million, putting the future of the company with a long string of award-winning films into the hands of a Hollywood outsider.
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