Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMiramax
IN THE NEWS

Miramax

ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Miramax Chairman Richard Nanula has taken a leave of absence from the Santa Monica independent film studio and from its co-owner Colony Capital, where he is also a principal. The disclosure of Nanula's departure Wednesday came after two websites recently published photos of a man identified as Nanula having sex with an adult film actress. One of the sites has since removed the photos. A spokeswoman for Colony Capital declined to discuss the posted images or when Nanula might return.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before seeing the ratings for 'The Following.' The Skinny: The game is still almost two weeks away and I'm already tired of Super Bowl hype. I'll never make it to February 3. Tuesday's headlines include a recap of the holiday box office, Blockbuster is closing more stores, and a wild party at Sundance. Daily Dose: Sunday's AFC and NFC championship games drew big audiences, but numbers were off from 2012. Fox's coverage of the Falcons-49ers game averaged 42 million viewers, a drop of more than 15 million compared with last year's Giants-Packers game.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2013 | By Ben Fritz
In a move that gives more control of the independent film studio to investment firm Colony Capital and its chief Tom Barack, construction magnate Ron Tutor has sold his stake in Miramax. The buyer is the Qatari Investment Authority, the sovereign wealth fund of the Middle Eastern nation and a partner of Colony's, said a knowledgeable person who was not authorized to discuss the topic publicly. The Qatari fund was already the largest stakeholder in Miramax when a consortium of buyers acquired the pioneering independent film company from Walt Disney Co. in 2010 for $663 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Warner/Chappell, the music publishing arm of Warner Music Group, has acquired the copyrights of film scores from hundreds of Miramax movies, including "Good Will Hunting," "The Cider House Rules," "Gangs of New York" and "Finding Neverland. " Terms of the deal, announced Tuesday morning, were not disclosed. The acquisition includes the publishing rights as well as the master recordings of scores in Miramax's entire catalog of more than 700 films. "The digital age continues to create new ways for music to be licensed, whether it's on YouTube, games or TV shows," Cameron Strang, chairman of Warner/Chappell, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
Troubled film financier David Bergstein has sued the owners of Miramax, alleging that they denied him money and an equity stake owed for his role in the acquisition of the film label from Walt Disney Co. in 2010. The suit, filed Monday in Los Angeles Superior Court by the law firm Weingarten Brown, contends that Bergstein — who has been involved in dozens of lawsuits, many related to his activities in the film business — played a crucial role in the deal to acquire Miramax. It asserts that Santa Monica private equity firm Colony Capital, one of Miramax's new owners, and its principal Richard Nanula conspired to deny Bergstein a $6.1-million fee and 3.3% stake they agreed to provide him as part of the purchase.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Big breaks rarely happen quite this way: Comic book artist and aspiring director Troy Nixey submitted his short "Latchkey's Lament" to Oscar-nominated filmmaker Guillermo del Toro, looking for guidance and feedback. What he received instead was a shot to direct his first feature, Friday's "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark. " An update of the 1973 TV movie of the same name, the film follows a young girl (Bailee Madison) sent to live with her father (Guy Pearce) and his girlfriend (Katie Holmes)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's often said that the journey is the oldest of narrative forms, and much of Jim Jarmusch's career has been devoted to finding new variations on this ancient theme. His filmography abounds with road trips and wanderlust-stricken heroes, from the hepcat drifter in his no-budget debut, "Permanent Vacation," to the enigmatic hit man on a mission through Spain in his latest, "The Limits of Control. " But no Jarmusch journey has been as cosmic — as much of a trip, in every sense of the word — as his hallucinatory frontier odyssey "Dead Man. " The film earned mixed reviews when it opened in 1996, nearly a year after its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival and after a reported wrangle over the final edit between Jarmusch and the distributor, Miramax.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Miramax Films has signed a digital distribution agreement with online video distributor Hulu as part of an ongoing effort to generate more revenue from its library of more than 700 films. Subscribers to Hulu's premium service Hulu Plus, which costs $7.99 a month, will get access to hundreds of Miramax titles that will be added over the next few months. "Pulp Fiction" and 26 others were the first to be made available for streaming Wednesday. Miramax announced a similar deal last month to put its films on Netflix's Internet streaming service.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Miramax Films has signed a multiyear agreement worth at least $100 million to make its movies available on Netflix's online streaming service. The newly independent studio decided to forego a potentially larger payment from Netflix in order to keep the distribution deal non-exclusive. That will allow Miramax to offer its films on other digital platforms as well, according to a knowledgeable person who asked not to be identified because the deal terms are confidential. Miramax has been having such discussions with Google, Hulu, Amazon.com and other online distributors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Landing your first gig as a director often requires treading a bumpy road, but Massy Tadjedin began by throwing some extra stones into her own path. First, the then-31-year-old screenwriter set out to make her directorial debut, "Last Night," with a genre that's become endangered in Hollywood: independent adult drama. Second, the script, her own, focused on infidelity, a well-worn subject that requires near-perfect execution. Third, she needed $7 million at a time — around the start of the global financial crisis — when funds for indie films had all but dried up. "I think it was always a difficult film to pitch, to persuade.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|