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OPINION
April 2, 2013
Re "What would Reagan do?," Opinion, March 28 Graham Allison asserts that after spending $150 billion over 30 years on missile defense, the objection that destroying a missile with another missile is impossible has been largely overcome. But later, he writes, "In reality, current U.S. missile defense systems are capable only of defending against a limited number of primitive ballistic missiles. " Do intelligent people really believe that missile defense system development can stay ahead of offensive threat development?
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 15, 2014
Re "Claiming Reagan for 2016," Opinion, March 11 Disagreeing with Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) for calling President Reagan a non-interventionist, Jonah Goldberg writes, "Any analysis that casts the passionate anti-communist invader of Grenada (without congressional approval), supporter of the Afghan mujahedin, champion of missile defense, bomber of Libya and winner of the Cold War as a non-interventionist certainly gets points for creativity. " After the 1983 Marines barracks bombing that killed nearly 250 Americans, Reagan peacefully pulled us out of Lebanon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2000
Our best missile defense is for us to develop, nurture and maintain open and friendly relations with our adversaries. It is economically and politically the prudent way to go. Our bloated military budget would be drastically reduced. MONROE LEUNG Los Angeles
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Defense contractor Raytheon Co. announced Chief Executive William H. Swanson will step down in March and will be replaced by Chief Operating Officer Thomas A. Kennedy. Swanson, who turns 65 in February, has served as the company's CEO since 2003. He will continue to serve as chairman of the board of directors until the company completes the transition process. Kennedy, 58, has served as executive vice president and COO of Raytheon since last April and oversaw the consolidation of Raytheon's six business units to four.
WORLD
November 20, 2012 | By Batsheva Sobelman and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
ASHDOD, Israel - School is out in this coastal city, Israel's fifth-most populous, but the playgrounds are empty. Most shops in the Sea Mall shopping center are closed. Halfway between Gaza City and Tel Aviv, Ashdod has been the target of rockets from the Gaza Strip during several days of hostilities between Israel and Hamas, the militant group that controls the strip. Between air raid sirens, citizens try to maintain some sense of normality, while staying within running distance of shelter.
WORLD
September 19, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes and Megan K. Stack
Russian Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin today praised Washington's "very right and brave decision" to drop plans for missile shield installations in Poland and the Czech Republic. Widely regarded as Russia's most powerful leader, Putin tempered his exuberance by suggesting that the revision of U.S. missile defense plans should be the first in a series of concessions to soothe ruffled relations with Moscow. "The latest decision by President Obama . . . has positive implications," Putin said in remarks carried on state media.
WORLD
November 19, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Paul Richter and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The Western military alliance agreed Friday to build an international missile defense system and offered Russia a role, a step aimed at reshaping the relationship with a former foe after years of mistrust and friction. Gathered at a summit in Lisbon, leaders of the 28 North Atlantic Treaty Organization states formally committed to a system aimed at protecting the United States and Europe from attack, and offered Russia a chance to collaborate in planning and operations. NATO leaders, who expect Russia to react positively, hope the agreement will lead to cooperation in areas where they could benefit from Moscow's help, including the war in Afghanistan, nuclear nonproliferation and the standoff with Iran.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Top Pentagon officials have grown increasingly confident in the nation's missile defense system at a time when North Korea is threatening to conduct a long-range launch, leading to speculation of a possible showdown in the exosphere. Though military officials said a clash between missiles of opposing nations was unlikely, preparations for possible action are at the most advanced stage yet.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency once again missed hitting its desired target during flight test of an interceptor missile from Vandenberg Air Force Base, northwest of Santa Barbara. The failure of the $214-million test Friday involved a ground-based defense system, designed by Boeing Co., to defend the U.S. from long-range ballistic missile attacks. The Missile Defense Agency now has a testing record of eight hits out of 16 intercept attempts with the “hit-to-kill” warheads.
WORLD
April 22, 2013 | By Paul Richter
BRUSSELS -- Secretary of State John F. Kerry is to host a meeting of top Afghan and Pakistani leaders here this week in hopes of breathing new life into flagging Afghan peace efforts. The meeting set for Wednesday is to bring together Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his defense minister, Bismullah Khan Mohammadi, with Pakistani army chief Gen.  Ashfaq Kayani and Foreign Secretary Jalil Abbas Jilani. A State Department official described the encounter as part of a series of three-way meetings that occur regularly at a lower level.
OPINION
April 14, 2013
Re "Getting Kim Jong Un's attention," Opinion, April 11 However couched in "let's not reward Pyongyang for bad behavior" terms, that is precisely what Mike Mochizuki and Michael O'Hanlon advocate. They make the tired recommendation of putting pressure on North Korea for internal reform. The Kim regime knows it would not survive any internal reform. Pyongyang will always resort to military brinkmanship to blackmail everyone else into caving in, and the stakes will only grow as its nuclear and missile technologies advance.
WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific reassured Congress on Tuesday that the U.S. military could intercept any missile launched by North Korea and aimed at America's territory or its East Asian allies. Adm. Samuel Locklear's briefing to senators came amid growing concern that North Korea is about to test a missile - some observers suggest as early as Wednesday - after weeks of bellicose threats. "We have a credible ability to defend the homeland, to defend Hawaii, to defend Guam, to defend our forward deployed forces and to defend our allies," Locklear told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
OPINION
April 5, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Obama administration is reacting responsibly to a series of provocations from North Korea, shoring up defenses while seeking a diplomatic solution to the crisis. But even if North Korea is deterred from attacking South Korea or U.S. forces for the foreseeable future, the defiance it has demonstrated in the last several weeks renders more elusive than ever achievement of the administration's ultimate goal: a Korean peninsula without nuclear weapons. Last month the U.N. Security Council - including China, North Korea's longtime patron - approved new economic sanctions after North Korea conducted a third nuclear test.
WORLD
April 3, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon said Wednesday that it was sending a mobile missile defense system to Guam as a "precautionary move," as Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said North Korea posed a "real and clear danger" to the U.S. military base on the western Pacific island, as well as to allies and other U.S. territory. North Korea has named Guam and Hawaii as potential targets in bellicose statements in recent weeks, which have increased tension on the Korean peninsula and prompted a series of U.S. military moves aimed at beefing up the American presence in the region and reassuring allies that the United States will come to their aid in the event of an attack.
OPINION
April 2, 2013
Re "What would Reagan do?," Opinion, March 28 Graham Allison asserts that after spending $150 billion over 30 years on missile defense, the objection that destroying a missile with another missile is impossible has been largely overcome. But later, he writes, "In reality, current U.S. missile defense systems are capable only of defending against a limited number of primitive ballistic missiles. " Do intelligent people really believe that missile defense system development can stay ahead of offensive threat development?
OPINION
April 2, 2013
Re "Iran appears the victor in postwar Iraq ," March 29 In 1991, the first President Bush, a decorated World War II combat veteran, was content to simply drive Saddam Hussein's forces out of Kuwait. Iraq was left militarily capable of opposing its longtime nemesis, Iran. A decade later, the second President Bush, who had avoided military service outside the U.S. during the Vietnam War, justified his full-scale invasion of Iraq using false pretenses, toppling the ruling regime.
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