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NEWS
March 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Delta Star missile-hunting satellite thundered into orbit Friday and quickly spotted a target as it began a key months-long test to develop a split-second "Star Wars" defense against nuclear rockets. The payload's sensors passed their first trial within two hours after launching when they successfully tracked the thrusting second stage of the Delta booster rocket after separation and during its fiery destruction in the atmosphere over the Indian Ocean.
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WORLD
September 3, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Israel said it carried out a joint missile test with the U.S. over the Mediterranean Sea that was detected Tuesday morning by a Russian radar system. Earlier in the day, Russia announced the detection of two "ballistic" objects over the Mediterranean, state-run media outlets RIA-Novosti and ITAR-TASS reported. The two launches were picked up at 10:16 a.m. Moscow time, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu reportedly informed President Vladimir Putin. The news initially raised concerns of a possible missile strike against Syria -- the U.S. is weighing an attack on the country in the wake of an alleged chemical weapons attack by the Syrian government -- but the Russian Embassy in Damascus reported no sign of any explosions or damage from missiles, RIA-Novosti reported.
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NEWS
February 23, 1996 | Associated Press
The Navy says it has demonstrated for the first time a warship's potential to shoot down a sea-skimming cruise missile before the ship's own radar can even detect the missile. A key to the "Mountain Top" project was the use of a communications network that enabled the frigate Lake Erie to shoot down four missiles in four attempts, based on tracking signals provided by a radar about 30 miles away from the ship, officials said Wednesday.
WORLD
September 3, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders and Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
JERUSALEM - Israel said Tuesday that it had tested a new version of its Sparrow target missile over the Mediterranean Sea, an unannounced launch that was immediately detected by Russia and quickly raised tensions in a region already on edge over a possible U.S. strike against Syria. U.S. and Israeli officials initially refused to comment on the test, raising questions about who was behind the launch and what was targeted. Russia was the first to announce that it had detected two unknown ballistic launches at about 9:15 a.m. Jerusalem time.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon made final preparations Thursday for a missile defense flight test that has drawn intense world interest, yet will leave unanswered key technical questions about the system's ability to shield the United States from attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1999
No one can argue that the proliferation of advanced offensive weapons of any kind poses a danger to the world peace. President of the Republic of Korea Kim Dae Jung's call on North Korea to cancel its test-firing of a long-range missile is justified and practical ("Pain Would Follow Missile Test," Commentary, Aug. 30). But in order to carry out a meaningful negotiation, one must also have a clear perspective from the viewpoint of one's opponent. If North Korea is to be persuaded to cancel its missile test, wouldn't it be natural for it to ask about the missile tests that are being carried out continuously by the U.S., which not only supplies the weaponry to the Republic of Korea but also stations its armed forces on the Korean Peninsula and across the Sea of Japan?
WORLD
July 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Iran has conducted what it called a final test of its ballistic missile Shahab-3, which is capable of reaching Israel and U.S. forces stationed in Saudi Arabia and Turkey, the Foreign Ministry said. The test took place "several weeks ago," ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said. The Shahab-3 has a range of about 800 miles, meaning it could also reach U.S. troops in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989 | From Reuters
A test of an unarmed U.S. cruise missile over Alberta was canceled Tuesday after fog enveloped an Alaskan air force base, Canadian military officials said. Tanker airplanes that refuel the U.S. B-52 bomber carrying the missile were unable to take off from the base, the officials said.
WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Japan readied its missile defense systems Tuesday against a possible North Korean weapons test, saying it would shoot down any missiles or debris if Japanese territory was threatened. Patriot anti-missile batteries were deployed on the grounds of the Defense Ministry in Tokyo and at military installations in and around the capital, according to Japanese news reports. The PAC-3 batteries will also be based on the island of Okinawa, which hosts the bulk of U.S. troops in Japan, sooner than planned in response to North Korea's threats, the Asahi Shimbun reported . Deploying the anti-missile system in Tokyo is “part of our moves to establish a system to protect the lives of our citizens and ensure their safety,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said at a news conference, according to Jiji Press . Suga earlier said that the missiles will be used solely to protect Japan, according to the Japan Times . Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pushed for Japan to reinterpret its constitution, which bans waging war, to allow Japan to intercept missiles fired at United States targets.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Missile Defense Agency breathed a sigh of relief after carrying out a successful flight test of an interceptor missile from Vandenberg Air Force Base, northwest of Santa Barbara. Saturday's test was on the Boeing-designed ground-based defense system's ability to defend the U.S. from the threat of ballistic missile attacks. It involved the launch of a three-stage interceptor from a silo on the base at 2 p.m. PST.  After blastoff, the booster deployed the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle made by Raytheon Co. to a designated point in space.
WORLD
April 19, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - India on Thursday successfully test-fired a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile that landed 20 minutes later in the Indian Ocean. The 50-ton, 55-foot three-stage Agni V rocket, named after the Hindu god for fire and dubbed the "China killer" by some in India's hyperactive news media, reportedly reached its target at the outer end of its 3,100-mile range, confirming that the weapon system can reach Shanghai and Beijing. It lifted off from an island in the eastern state of Odisha.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan
A flying Boeing 747 jumbo jet equipped with a massive laser gun shot down a Scud-like missile over the Pacific late Thursday night, marking what analysts said was a major milestone in the development of the nation's missile defense system. The test shoot-down at 8:44 p.m. over a military test range near Point Mugu is expected to renew debate over spending billions of dollars for a system that is years behind schedule and derided by some as irrelevant in today's conflicts. The test, which the Pentagon described as a success, could also help resuscitate an important military program for Southern California, where much of the high-tech system has been developed and tested.
WORLD
December 19, 2009 | By Ramin Mostaghim
A top Iranian nuclear official sought Friday to ease international worries about his nation's nuclear program days after Tehran test-fired an upgraded medium-range missile that alarmed the West. Ali Akbar Salehi, head of the country's Atomic Energy Organization, said Iran won't have a new generation of more efficient centrifuges for the production of nuclear fuel until 2011 and won't have its heavy-water plant in Arak operational for "three or four years." His statement was a possible attempt at reassuring world powers that there was no hurry to place new sanctions on Iran.
WORLD
December 17, 2009 | By Ramin Mostaghim
Iranian authorities confronted their international and domestic rivals Wednesday, angering the West by testing a high-speed missile and raising political tensions at home by warning reformist opposition leaders they could be arrested. Brig. Gen. Ahmad Vahidi, Iran's defense minister, lauded the latest test-firing of the Sejil-2 surface-to-surface missile, which was broadcast on television in Iran. He praised the upgraded version of the missile for "its remarkable speed in entering the atmosphere, its strong impact and its radar-evading covers," and for its quick blastoff time, state television reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Florence Foster, an electronics technician who blew the whistle on a tiny Los Angeles-area outpost of Northrop Corp., which led to a massive criminal case involving the falsification of tests on cruise missiles, has died. She was 68. Foster died July 30 of renal failure at a Covina hospital, said her daughter, Jolene C. Vargas. After becoming one of about 30 employees in 1983 at a small division of Northrop, located in El Monte and then Pomona, Foster quickly knew "something was terribly wrong," she told The Times several years later.
WORLD
July 3, 2009 | John M. Glionna
North Korea test-fired four short-range missiles Thursday, according to South Korea's Defense Ministry. The launches came just weeks after the reclusive state warned vessels to avoid its coastline because of projected military maneuvers. The regime sent up what officials said were two anti-ship missiles that flew 60 miles before splashing down in the sea. Two more short-range missiles were fired a few hours later.
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