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Mission San Juan Capistrano

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TRAVEL
June 13, 2010 | From The Los Angeles Times
Zorro leaves his mark at mission Zorro, the legendary masked crusader who pulled off Robin Hood-like deeds in Old California with the flick of his sword, has returned to his old haunt. A new exhibit at Mission San Juan Capistrano highlights many famous Zorros — Douglas Fairbanks, Tyrone Power, Guy Williams and, most recently, Antonio Banderas — with costumes and props from films and the vintage TV serial. Also on display is the original "pitch book" that persuaded Walt Disney to produce the TV show based on the Zorro character.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2013 | Mike Anton
When Father Vincent Lloyd Russell looked upon the paintings depicting Jesus' suffering and death, he didn't like what he saw. They were a mess. Dirty from generations of neglect, colors faded, canvases torn. Certainly nothing befitting the chapel where Father Junipero Serra had celebrated Mass at Mission San Juan Capistrano nearly two centuries earlier. It was the early 1970s, and Russell reached out to a man who played the church organ on Sundays. William Maldonado was also a gifted, self-taught artist who could copy virtually anything.
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NEWS
April 8, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Rick Vanderknyff, Susan Greene, and Henry Rivero / Los Angeles Times
Mission San Juan Capistrano 31522 Camino Capistrano San Juan Capistrano (714) 493-1424 LOCATION: off Interstate 5 and Ortega Highway, at the corner of Camino Capistrano. HOURS OF OPERATION: 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., year-round. ADMISSION: $2 adults; $1 children under 12 years old; children under 6 free. HISTORY: By 1697, the Jesuit order, in cooperation with Spain, had begun to establish a chain of missions in Lower or Baja California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
A bird's call rings endlessly inside the adobe walls at Mission San Juan Capistrano as tourists wander through the courtyard - ablaze with flowers in full bloom - and a handful of fourth-graders snap pictures and take notes for class projects. Hardly the sweet song of the nightingale, the sound is more like the croak of a distressed frog - or, by an expert's own description, a "rusty, squeaky door. " It's a last-ditch effort to lure back the cliff swallow, which put San Juan Capistrano on the map but has snubbed the mission in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1989 | Herbert J. Vida
When he was 56 and had been behind a bank desk for 26 years, Charles Bodner retired to see the country he had fought for as a U.S. Army officer in Africa during World War II. Bodner, now 74, and his wife Catherine, 71, wandered through the states for 13 years. But as fate would have it, he is back behind a desk. This time it's in a windowless fourth-floor office, where he organizes Mission San Juan Capistrano archives, which date to 1778. "Look at me now," said Bodner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995 | JEFF BEAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Brian Brazeal is a young man practicing a dying craft. Machines such as welding torches and drill presses may have gutted the demand for old-fashioned blacksmiths, but Brazeal has still found a way to pound out a living with his hands. Six days a week, the 35-year-old Oklahoma native can be found at Mission San Juan Capistrano, turning red-hot iron into things that people want and buy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1992 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It lures a diverse set of worshipers: A real estate lawyer from Irvine, a Basque from southwestern France, a homeless man who sleeps on the streets of this historic city. But when they file into Serra Chapel on the grounds of Mission San Juan Capistrano each morning, this eclectic crowd maintains a tradition that began 210 years ago with Father Junipero Serra, the Franciscan missionary priest who built missions from San Diego to San Francisco during the colonization of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After nearly 200 years of destruction and decay, the Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano is finally getting a face-lift. Construction crews Tuesday poured concrete beams into the east wall of the crumbling church, signaling a major step forward in the mission's $7-million project to preserve and retrofit the stone structure. "This is a real landmark event for us," mission administrator Jerry Miller said. "This is not just a pile of rubble. . . . It deserves to be saved."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last 30 years, one of Dorothy O'Quinn's dreams was to come to Mission San Juan Capistrano and watch the fabled March 19 return of the swallows. The 81-year-old retired schoolteacher's wish was finally fulfilled Thursday. Armed with her camera, O'Quinn arrived at the mission early and couldn't help but keep scanning the skies. To hear her tell it, she expected the sky to darken and thousands of the migratory birds to swoop down into the mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had Father Junipero Serra happened upon Mission San Juan Capistrano any morning this week, he might have been astounded to see the latest group attracted to the now world-famous edifice he built 219 years ago. * Nestled in the quadrangle, amid sweeping bougainvillea, palm trees and cobblestone pathways dotted by petunias, were scores of painters. Painters, in fact, were everywhere. They came as early as 7 a.m., every day this week, seeking the sweetest mixture of light and shadow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2012 | Dan Weikel
The air may be chilly from the weekend's winter storm, but San Juan Capistrano is gearing up for spring by celebrating the annual return of the swallows. Monday was Swallows' Day for Mission San Juan Capistrano, where lore has it that cliff swallows return each year just in time for St. Joseph's Day after wintering 6,000 miles away in Argentina. Although the gregarious birds have hardly been seen at the historic mission in recent years, swallows nest in small numbers elsewhere, in the eaves of schools, shopping malls and underneath freeway overpasses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
At Mission San Juan Capistrano, founded centuries ago to spread the Christian faith, Rabbi Allen Krause started an annual interfaith conference in 1994 because he felt that Orange County's religious groups were too insular. About 600 people attended the first Religious Diversity Faire, with spiritual leaders from more than a dozen faiths holding workshops on their beliefs and practices. The event was staged for 15 more years. Providing a window into the religious beliefs of others was a recurring theme for Krause, who was recognized as a trailblazer in the county's interfaith movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The crucifix has a bullet wound. The story goes that around 1900 a man embroiled in a business dispute unloaded his anger — and his pistol — inside a chapel at Mission San Juan Capistrano. Miraculously, no one was hurt. But the 18th century silver cross likely used by mission founder Father Junipero Serra took one near the top. That the crucifix survived at all is a miracle itself. Generations of carelessness and theft stripped California's missions of much of their artwork and artifacts.
TRAVEL
June 13, 2010 | From The Los Angeles Times
Zorro leaves his mark at mission Zorro, the legendary masked crusader who pulled off Robin Hood-like deeds in Old California with the flick of his sword, has returned to his old haunt. A new exhibit at Mission San Juan Capistrano highlights many famous Zorros — Douglas Fairbanks, Tyrone Power, Guy Williams and, most recently, Antonio Banderas — with costumes and props from films and the vintage TV serial. Also on display is the original "pitch book" that persuaded Walt Disney to produce the TV show based on the Zorro character.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2009 | Paloma Esquivel
There was a time, people here say, when the swallows swarmed San Juan Capistrano in the days just before winter gave way to spring. Every year, locals say, the white-bellied birds filled the sky like a rain cloud. They returned to their nests in the old adobe mission as church bells rang, heralding their arrival. But the mission bells have rung over and over during this year's Festival of the Swallows, which ends today, and the tiny birds just won't make an appearance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2008 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Kinoshita and Del Obispo elementary schools are just an athletic field apart, but for many in San Juan Capistrano, the gap is a potent symbol of an issue that has roiled this south Orange County town in recent years: school segregation. The schools are on the edge of a middle-class, mostly white neighborhood. But while Del Obispo's students are about 55% white, Kinoshita's enrollment is about 95% Latino. It is a disparity that former district teacher Gia Lugo said highlights the wide gap in race relations in this historic community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The bluish-silver mist floated mysteriously from under the stone archway of Mission San Juan Capistrano and began moving. Although he was shaken, altar boy Jerry Nieblas and a friend stood and watched the apparition glide along the cobblestone pathway. When it reached the stone Fountain of the Four Evangelists, the mist crept up the ledge as though it were trying to rise. Then it vanished just as suddenly as it had appeared.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
Cliff swallows have a wide breeding range for a migratory bird--all the way from the northern Yukon down into southern Mexico--but it's their annual return to one tiny spot in San Juan Capistrano that brings out the crowds. The return of the swallows (celebrated in a hit 1940 tune) to Mission San Juan Capistrano will be marked Thursday, St. Joseph's Day, when 98-year-old town patriarch Paul Arbiso rings the mission bells, just as he has done for more than six decades.
REAL ESTATE
November 4, 2007 | By Irene Lechowitzky, Special to The Times
When it comes to stepping back in time, the Los Rios Historic District in San Juan Capistrano can claim major bragging rights. It is one of the oldest residential neighborhoods in California, with adobe homes built in the 1790s and 200-year-old pepper and olive trees. Beginnings The historic district is just a stone's throw from Mission San Juan Capistrano, and the origins of both are intertwined. Forty adobe structures were built on and around Los Rios Street in 1794 as housing for Indian neophytes with ties to the mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2007 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
When Mission San Juan Capistrano built a rectory garden for parish priests this summer, there was one blessing they forgot to seek: the city's. Officials learned of the project -- replete with rose bushes, a fountain and an outdoor kitchen with a fireplace -- and ordered the work to stop, saying they believed it was on a portion of an old Native American cemetery.
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