Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMissionaries Of Charity Organization
IN THE NEWS

Missionaries Of Charity Organization

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1997 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an unsung memorial, delivered in a place and a way that Mother Teresa doubtless would have savored. A blue and white Ford van, serving as a battered vessel of the famous missionary's spirit, was crammed full of food and faithful followers as it bobbed to a stop Saturday morning in one of Central Los Angeles' fouler back alleys. From a still row of tarp and wood lean-tos emerged a woman, a soiled T-shirt down to her knees. In an instant, served and servers were locked in knowing embraces.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2001 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A religious group founded by the late Mother Teresa will not be able to continue serving homeless people in a historic mansion near downtown Los Angeles. The Central Area Planning Commission denied the Missionaries of Charity Brothers--a Roman Catholic order founded in India--a conditional use permit and zone variance that would have allowed them to continue the services. A zoning administrator had denied the special permits, and the Brothers had appealed.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
An ailing Mother Teresa handed over her global mission Thursday to an Indian-born nun who converted to Roman Catholicism after being inspired by the works of the Nobel laureate. Sister Nirmala, born of a priestly Hindu caste, was selected by a conclave of 120 nuns who deliberated for eight weeks. "Now I am happy," said Mother Teresa, 86, who guided the mission for half a century. "Pray, so that she can continue God's work."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1997 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an unsung memorial, delivered in a place and a way that Mother Teresa doubtless would have savored. A blue and white Ford van, serving as a battered vessel of the famous missionary's spirit, was crammed full of food and faithful followers as it bobbed to a stop Saturday morning in one of Central Los Angeles' fouler back alleys. From a still row of tarp and wood lean-tos emerged a woman, a soiled T-shirt down to her knees. In an instant, served and servers were locked in knowing embraces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2001 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A religious group founded by the late Mother Teresa will not be able to continue serving homeless people in a historic mansion near downtown Los Angeles. The Central Area Planning Commission denied the Missionaries of Charity Brothers--a Roman Catholic order founded in India--a conditional use permit and zone variance that would have allowed them to continue the services. A zoning administrator had denied the special permits, and the Brothers had appealed.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | Reuters
Mother Teresa is to open a new home for London's destitute in an unused courthouse, her Missionaries of Charity organization said Friday. The 82-year-old nun, awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979 and renowned for her work in the slums of Calcutta, will open the new mission next year in a converted law court that will provide shelter for up to 40 homeless people.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | From Times wire services
Mother Teresa got up from her bed today to walk for the first time after a pacemaker was implanted beside the heart of the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, a medical bulletin said. The bulletin issued by Woodlands Nursing Home described the 79-year-old nun's condition as stable. Doctors implanted a pacemaker next to the heart of the Roman Catholic nun last Friday to help correct an irregular heartbeat that had made her giddy and had forced her second hospital admission in three months.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | JAMES MARNELL
--Tom Willi and Tom Gannon are the driving force behind an expedition that will set out next Monday to seek to solve the mysterious disappearance of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, 52 years ago in the South Pacific. Willi, 62, a former Navy pilot, and Gannon, 69, a former Air Force navigator, both of Ft. Walton Beach, Fla.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
An ailing Mother Teresa handed over her global mission Thursday to an Indian-born nun who converted to Roman Catholicism after being inspired by the works of the Nobel laureate. Sister Nirmala, born of a priestly Hindu caste, was selected by a conclave of 120 nuns who deliberated for eight weeks. "Now I am happy," said Mother Teresa, 86, who guided the mission for half a century. "Pray, so that she can continue God's work."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|