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NATIONAL
July 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The Army Corps of Engineers refused to reduce Missouri River water levels despite a federal judge's order to cut flows to protect endangered birds and fish. The corps said the judge's order conflicts with a federal court ruling that there must be enough water in the Missouri for barges and power plants to operate. Earlier, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler in Washington denied a request by the Justice Department and the state of Nebraska to suspend her ruling.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A week after torrential rains forced massive flooding across eastern Colorado, the huge volume of water is moving east -- literally rolling down the river toward Nebraska. Even as Colorado continues to deal with the aftermath of its flooding disaster, the National Weather Service on Wednesday posted flood warnings for the South Platte River, the North Platte River and the main Platte River in at least three Nebraska counties, Deuel, Keith and Lincoln. “The exact crest stages are still uncertain as the waters are just moving into Nebraska,” the National Weather Service said.
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NEWS
October 18, 1986 | United Press International
A secondary flood crest on the Missouri River passed through St. Charles on Friday, causing little additional damage to homes inundated in last week's record flooding. "As far as the worst of it, it's over with," said Sgt. Pete Bishop of the St. Charles County Sheriff's Department. "We're not expecting any more damage." Sheriff's deputies no longer are patrolling several trailer parks in the county, Bishop said, but an officer remained on duty in West Alton and Portage des Sioux.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2013 | By Michael Mello
Three escapees from a Kansas prison were caught in Missouri, two of them after attempting to kidnap the mayor of a small town, authorities said. The Kansas Department of Corrections reported that Randy Ridens Sr., Allen Hurst and Scott Gilbert were back in custody Friday night, several hours after they walked away from a minimum-security wing of Lansing Correction Facility northwest of Kansas City. Platte County Prosecutor Eric Zahnd told The Associated Press that Hurst, 31, and Gilbert, 49, were in the county jail on $5-million bail and by Saturday were facing a dozen felony charges.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A surging crest rolled down the Missouri River like a rat through a rattlesnake Wednesday, threatening cities and towns across the state of Missouri, where long weeks of flooding have shaved levees down to the ground. Authorities said 98% of all dikes along the Missouri from Kansas City to St. Louis have been damaged, leaving many communities defenseless against the crest. It was moving like a sea swell, at 2 3/4 m.p.h., where the river was wide and deep, up to 15 to 20 m.p.h.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Missouri River should meander freely along some stretches, returning to the conditions that existed before dams and channels created barge traffic routes, the National Research Council said Wednesday. A more natural flow might entail an end to navigation along portions that are open to towboat traffic, but entire species of birds and fish may disappear without it, the council said after two years of study.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | J. DUNCAN MOORE Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mighty Missouri is full and flowing in its southern reaches, thanks to Mother Nature and the federal courts. While the northern portions of the Missouri basin--especially North and South Dakota--are hard hit by drought, the southern portions through Kansas and Missouri now have plenty of water for both irrigation and navigation. Storms and drought are unpredictable factors in that equation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After their two-year journey from St. Louis to the Pacific and back shortly after the Louisiana Purchase, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark left behind volumes of notes, maps and scientific descriptions of new plants and animals that they identified on their voyage of discovery. What they apparently did not leave behind, however, was much physical evidence of their passage.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Rain forced hundreds more residents of the Mississippi Valley from their homes Friday as levees burst and the region's flood crisis showed no signs of a quick end. Earthen levees in Keithsburg, Andalusia and Quawka, Ill., which had been holding back floodwaters, gave way Friday morning--releasing the turbulent Mississippi River and causing the evacuation of at least 850 residents of Keithsburg.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | KATE BAILEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The mighty Missouri River, often jokingly described as too thick to drink and too thin to plow, is becoming as notorious as the East River in New York City. Both are convenient places for killers to dump the bodies of their victims. Law enforcement officers in the Kansas City area say they are finding too many bodies floating in its murky, churning currents, including the bodies of women who have had their legs cut off.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
An unusually heavy Rocky Mountain snowmelt coupled with spring rains have swelled the Missouri River and its dams to dangerously high levels, prompting thousands of North and South Dakota residents to evacuate and prepare for flooding. The rising river flowing through the Dakotas has strained infrastructure designed to protect communities in the Missouri River basin, said Michael Fowle, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Aberdeen, S.D. "It's the perfect storm, but in the worst sense," Fowle said.
OPINION
May 25, 2011 | By Paul VanDevelder
On a frosty May morning in 1951, a young woman named Louise Holding Eagle jumped into the cab of her pickup truck, waved goodbye to her husband and two toddlers, and drove off to buy groceries in Beulah, N.D., the nearest town, about 35 miles from their farm. Louise decided to make a day of it when she ran into old friends at the store, and finally turned for home at twilight. "None of us had phones back then, but my husband Matthew was an easygoin' man, and I knew he wouldn't mind if I was late.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Up to 10 inches of rain pummeled parts of Oklahoma City on Monday, unleashing flash floods that stranded drivers and prompted numerous rescues, including a teenage girl who grasped at tree branches to stay afloat. Some Oklahoma City streets were deep with floodwaters and rescuers used boats to pull residents and others to safety. Widespread power outages also hit the area. The downpour came in less than 12 hours, and another 2 to 4 inches were expected Monday night, the National Weather Service said.
NATIONAL
June 13, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Rescue crews were desperately searching by foot, horseback and kayak Saturday for dozens of people feared lost after a flash flood ravaged an isolated Arkansas campground, killing 18 people. The flood, which woke campers at the Albert Pike Campground and ripped 5-inch slabs of asphalt from parking lots, barreled through the area about 5:30 a.m. Friday. The Little Missouri River, popular for rainbow trout and smallmouth bass fishing, was about 20 feet high at one point, said Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe at a news conference Saturday.
NEWS
January 11, 2009 | John Miller, Miller writes for the Associated Press.
A silver medal that may have been given to a Nez Perce Indian chief by Lewis and Clark in 1806 as a symbol of America's emerging power has made an improbable journey from the rolling Clearwater Valley to New York City's concrete canyons. Its provenance isn't ironclad, but some historians believe the Jefferson Peace Medal minted in Philadelphia went up the Missouri River in a pirogue, was buried and exhumed from an Indian grave by Northern Pacific Railroad workers and eventually landed with Edward Dean Adams, the New York financier and J.P. Morgan contemporary.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Floodwaters rose still higher across Missouri on Thursday, leading residents to remove valuables from their homes and fill sandbags to protect river communities. Near-record flooding that inundated the village of Big Lake this week broke more levees Thursday, and water levels were expected to peak in some spots this weekend. In other areas, however, the danger appeared to be passing. The Missouri River had fallen a few inches Thursday near Craig, where inmates from a St.
NATIONAL
June 13, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Rescue crews were desperately searching by foot, horseback and kayak Saturday for dozens of people feared lost after a flash flood ravaged an isolated Arkansas campground, killing 18 people. The flood, which woke campers at the Albert Pike Campground and ripped 5-inch slabs of asphalt from parking lots, barreled through the area about 5:30 a.m. Friday. The Little Missouri River, popular for rainbow trout and smallmouth bass fishing, was about 20 feet high at one point, said Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe at a news conference Saturday.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
A federal court on Friday scheduled a contempt hearing against the Army Corps of Engineers for refusing to comply with its order to reduce water levels on the Missouri River. Also Friday, an appeals court rebuffed a government effort to halt the federal court's order. Conservation groups are suing the corps under the federal Endangered Species Act, saying the river must be restored to a more seasonal ebb and flow, mimicking natural river conditions before dams and channels were built.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2005 | Craig Ligibel, Special to The Times
The smell of wood smoke and burning sage filled the lean-to. Rain pounded the roof. Soggy clothing hung helter-skelter overhead, and river mud coated the floor. Still, the mood was magical. All eyes watched our camp cook, Tony Kellar, who is part Creek Indian, as he read aloud from "The Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living," a book of Native American wisdom. The story was a parable about humility, which we would all learn by the end of our kayak trip.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
State wildlife officials plan to destroy nearly half a million farm-raised trout that became contaminated with PCBs, apparently from paint used at Montana's largest hatchery. The PCB-laden paint was applied more than 25 years ago to the walls of the fish tanks at the Big Springs Trout Hatchery in Lewistown, where the trout are raised to help stock lakes along the Missouri River.
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