Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMitch Landrieu
IN THE NEWS

Mitch Landrieu

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
February 6, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu was elected in a landslide Saturday to be this city's first new mayor since Hurricane Katrina -- and the first white mayor in majority-black New Orleans since 1978, when his father, Maurice Edwin "Moon" Landrieu, left office. With all 366 precincts reporting, Landrieu, 49, took 66% of the vote total. The next-highest tally went to businessman Troy Henry, who had 14%. Landrieu's father was a historically transitional figure who earned the respect of blacks by opening up city contracting and jobs to them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The New Orleans Police Department has engaged in a wide-ranging pattern of misconduct including the excessive use of force and unconstitutional arrests, the Department of Justice announced on Thursday. In a lacerating report that followed an investigation requested by local officials, the Justice Department found the department had failed to adequately protect the city. There have been complaints about the department for years, but the difficulties reached a crescendo when unarmed people were shot in the wake of the tumult of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
Advertisement
OPINION
February 9, 2010
The New Orleans Saints' Super Bowl trophy provides a much-needed rallying point for a city still coping with battered housing, infrastructure and businesses, but the Big Easy united in a more significant fashion the day before the Saints' upset victory. On Saturday, voters in New Orleans overwhelmingly elected Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu as their next mayor, giving him a mandate to push past the political and social barriers that have slowed the city's recovery. The election results, along with a pair of multibillion-dollar construction projects that may soon get underway, give long-suffering residents reason to be optimistic about their city's future.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2010 | By Kim Murphy and Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Tim Williamson was asked this month to assess the state of his native New Orleans after the disaster. "After the disaster?" the nonprofit-group chief executive quipped, with a seen-it-all mordancy that's as common in the city as a potholed side street. "Which one?" The last few months have provided a roller-coaster run-up to Hurricane Katrina's fifth anniversary, which New Orleans was to observe Sunday with solemn prayers, a reunion of Superdome survivors, and a jazz funeral for the more than 1,800 dead along the Gulf Coast.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Savoring the vote of confidence Saturday that gave him a second term, Mayor C. Ray Nagin called for unity in the storm-ravaged city, saying it's "time for this community to start the healing process.... It's time for us to set the stage for recovery." Nagin won 52% of the 113,591 ballots cast in the runoff contest with Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu. Nearly 38% of registered voters turned out. His victory solidifies his leadership role in one of the toughest reconstruction projects in U.S. history.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Is "Chocolate City," as this town was famously called, on the verge of electing a vanilla mayor? That is the political question gripping New Orleans, where white candidate Mitch Landrieu, Louisiana's lieutenant governor, has emerged as a mayoral front-runner in a city where a black population diminished by Hurricane Katrina still holds a majority -- but where fear of the loss of black political power remains palpable. Landrieu, a 49-year-old Democrat, was defeated in the 2006 mayor's race by incumbent C. Ray Nagin, who is leaving office this year because of term limits.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The third-place finisher in the New Orleans mayoral race endorsed the runner-up, Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu, over Mayor C. Ray Nagin in next month's runoff election. Ron Forman, head of the organization that runs the city's zoo and aquarium, said Landrieu had his "full support" in the contest to decide who should lead the city in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Landrieu said he was pleased to get Forman's endorsement. The city "needs all of its people to come together.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2008 | From Times staff and wire reports
Gulf Coast officials asked lawmakers for fast federal money for hurricane recovery -- and a minimum of red tape. Texas is looking at $11.4 billion in damage from Hurricane Ike, including $16 million in damage to Houston, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said. Devastation in Galveston is an additional $2 billion, that city's mayor said. Louisiana faces $1 billion in damage, Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu said. New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin said in prepared testimony that the $40-million cost of evacuating his city for Hurricane Gustav had led to hiring freezes and a halt of new expenditures until disaster costs could be reimbursed.
NATIONAL
February 23, 2006 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
With the entry of one of the state's prominent politicians into the mayoral race, the campaign issues may move beyond rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina to the root causes of this city's problems that stretch back generations. And if he is elected, Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu will be the first white mayor to hold that office since his father left the job in 1978.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2006 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Setting the stage for an epic political battle in a beleaguered city, Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu will announce today that he will run against Mayor C. Ray Nagin in the April election, Landrieu's aides said Tuesday night. Landrieu's announcement will come this afternoon at a hotel on the bank of the Mississippi River, said aide Scott Shalett, who has taken a leave of absence as Landrieu's chief of staff and will be a senior advisor to the mayoral campaign.
OPINION
February 9, 2010
The New Orleans Saints' Super Bowl trophy provides a much-needed rallying point for a city still coping with battered housing, infrastructure and businesses, but the Big Easy united in a more significant fashion the day before the Saints' upset victory. On Saturday, voters in New Orleans overwhelmingly elected Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu as their next mayor, giving him a mandate to push past the political and social barriers that have slowed the city's recovery. The election results, along with a pair of multibillion-dollar construction projects that may soon get underway, give long-suffering residents reason to be optimistic about their city's future.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu was elected in a landslide Saturday to be this city's first new mayor since Hurricane Katrina -- and the first white mayor in majority-black New Orleans since 1978, when his father, Maurice Edwin "Moon" Landrieu, left office. With all 366 precincts reporting, Landrieu, 49, took 66% of the vote total. The next-highest tally went to businessman Troy Henry, who had 14%. Landrieu's father was a historically transitional figure who earned the respect of blacks by opening up city contracting and jobs to them.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Is "Chocolate City," as this town was famously called, on the verge of electing a vanilla mayor? That is the political question gripping New Orleans, where white candidate Mitch Landrieu, Louisiana's lieutenant governor, has emerged as a mayoral front-runner in a city where a black population diminished by Hurricane Katrina still holds a majority -- but where fear of the loss of black political power remains palpable. Landrieu, a 49-year-old Democrat, was defeated in the 2006 mayor's race by incumbent C. Ray Nagin, who is leaving office this year because of term limits.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2008 | From Times staff and wire reports
Gulf Coast officials asked lawmakers for fast federal money for hurricane recovery -- and a minimum of red tape. Texas is looking at $11.4 billion in damage from Hurricane Ike, including $16 million in damage to Houston, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said. Devastation in Galveston is an additional $2 billion, that city's mayor said. Louisiana faces $1 billion in damage, Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu said. New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin said in prepared testimony that the $40-million cost of evacuating his city for Hurricane Gustav had led to hiring freezes and a halt of new expenditures until disaster costs could be reimbursed.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Savoring the vote of confidence Saturday that gave him a second term, Mayor C. Ray Nagin called for unity in the storm-ravaged city, saying it's "time for this community to start the healing process.... It's time for us to set the stage for recovery." Nagin won 52% of the 113,591 ballots cast in the runoff contest with Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu. Nearly 38% of registered voters turned out. His victory solidifies his leadership role in one of the toughest reconstruction projects in U.S. history.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
For the last month, two of Louisiana's best-known political figures have battled each other for the right to lead this hurricane-devastated city back to prosperity. But as the incumbent mayor, C. Ray Nagin, and the lieutenant governor, Mitch Landrieu, have debated the future of New Orleans, it has become clear that the choice facing voters at the polls this weekend is not between competing strategies for revitalizing the city -- but rather between sharply different styles of leadership.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2010 | By Kim Murphy and Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Tim Williamson was asked this month to assess the state of his native New Orleans after the disaster. "After the disaster?" the nonprofit-group chief executive quipped, with a seen-it-all mordancy that's as common in the city as a potholed side street. "Which one?" The last few months have provided a roller-coaster run-up to Hurricane Katrina's fifth anniversary, which New Orleans was to observe Sunday with solemn prayers, a reunion of Superdome survivors, and a jazz funeral for the more than 1,800 dead along the Gulf Coast.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2006 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Candidates for mayor usually don't waste time stumping in other cities, much less other states. But New Orleans mayoral hopeful Mitch Landrieu was cheerfully working a Texas crowd Monday evening -- the latest sign that winning the April 22 election to lead the woebegone Crescent City would require extraordinary campaign tactics. More than six months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, only about a third of the city's nearly half-million residents have returned.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Mary Richardson has a plan. She will make the 10-hour road trip from her temporary home in San Antonio to New Orleans on May 18. On the 19th, she will rest. Then on Saturday, May 20, she intends to be one of the first in line to cast her ballot in the mayoral runoff between incumbent C. Ray Nagin and Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu. Richardson's objective is simple: "to make sure my candidate gets in." That candidate is Nagin.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The third-place finisher in the New Orleans mayoral race endorsed the runner-up, Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu, over Mayor C. Ray Nagin in next month's runoff election. Ron Forman, head of the organization that runs the city's zoo and aquarium, said Landrieu had his "full support" in the contest to decide who should lead the city in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Landrieu said he was pleased to get Forman's endorsement. The city "needs all of its people to come together.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|