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Mitch Mcconnel

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NEWS
March 15, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Mitch McConnell is sore. And it has nothing to do with the recent extractions of four wisdom teeth. Calling himself "the abominable no-man" as leader of those opposing campaign finance reform, McConnell says that he feels abandoned by his "friends" in the news media. The Republican senator from Kentucky says he's "outnumbered, as I usually am" while defending the 1st Amendment against mob rule.
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NATIONAL
October 12, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Efforts to reopen the government and avert a default on the nation's debt rested in the hands of the Senate's top leaders after talks between House Republicans and the White House broke down Saturday. Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) sat down to negotiate for the first time since the 12-day-old government shutdown began, but there were no indications they had made significant progress. Still, Senate leaders made plans for a rare Sunday session in case they reach a deal, while the House adjourned for the weekend after a brief and at times chaotic session.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997
Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and his moneyed, special-interest bedfellows feel that limits on campaign contributions are an egregious violation of free speech (March 15). I have a suggestion. Instead of limiting either contributions or spending, simply require that any candidate or contributor who donates or spends more than a certain amount of money donate an equal amount to any opposing candidates in their particular race. Legitimate "opposing candidates" could be defined by criteria similar to those required now for matching federal funds.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has repeatedly rescued Republicans in their fiscal fights with the White House. But not this time. At least not yet. The seasoned McConnell has distanced himself from tea party renegades in his party, spurning the effort by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) to halt funding for the government unless President Obama ends the Affordable Care Act, the nation's new healthcare law. “I just don't happen to think filibustering a bill that defunds Obamacare is the best route to defunding Obamacare,” McConnell said as the Senate opened Tuesday.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has repeatedly rescued Republicans in their fiscal fights with the White House. But not this time. At least not yet. The seasoned McConnell has distanced himself from tea party renegades in his party, spurning the effort by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) to halt funding for the government unless President Obama ends the Affordable Care Act, the nation's new healthcare law. “I just don't happen to think filibustering a bill that defunds Obamacare is the best route to defunding Obamacare,” McConnell said as the Senate opened Tuesday.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Ahead of a third consecutive day of meetings on raising the nation's debt ceiling, Republican leaders signaled increasing pessimism about the likelihood of a deal and laid the blame for deteriorating negotiations squarely on President Obama's shoulders. "I was one of those who had long hoped we could do something big for the country," Mitch McConnell, the Senate minority leader, said in a floor speech Tuesday. "But in my view, the president has presented us with three choices: smoke and mirrors, tax hikes, or default.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro
The Republican leader of the Senate, Mitch McConnell, said Wednesday that if the 2012 presidential election were being held today, the GOP theme should be: "He made it worse. " (see video below) The bumper-sticker slogan might not quite be morning-in-America optimism, but it captures the Republican position that President Obama has been unable to right the struggling economy, a position the White House routinely counters by saying the outlook would be worse had the president not taken took the steps he did to shore it up. Photos: The 2012 GOP presidential hopefuls McConnell said he had no worries about the emerging field of potential GOP presidential candidates to challenge Obama saying that eventually a front-runner would "get on a roll.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON -- If the battle lines of the next budget fight between the White House and Congress were not already clear, Mitch McConnell underscored them in emphatic terms Sunday. With three looming fiscal deadlines in the coming months, the Republican Senate minority leader made clear in a round of interviews on the Sunday morning talk shows that the GOP will not consider further tax increases to help pay down the nation's debt. “The tax issue is finished, over, completed,” McConnell said on ABC's “This Week.” “That's behind us. Now the question is, what are we going to do about the biggest problem confronting our country and our future?
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday again extended an invitation to President Obama to visit Capitol Hill to meet with the chamber's Republicans in a effort to break the logjam in deficit-reduction talks as a federal default deadline nears. McConnell invited the president to meet with the Senate GOP last week -- an invitation that the White House declined. Democratic leaders have said they expect Obama to meet with them this week on the Hill, but the White House has not yet confirmed that visit.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Katherine Skiba and Peter Nicholas
The Senate's top-ranking Republican said Sunday that lawmakers are "very, very close" to an agreement to raise the nation's debt limit, as Congress works to meet an imminent deadline to stave off an unprecedented federal default. In separate interviews, Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) indicated that progress had been made late Saturday in conversations between the White House and congressional leaders on a debt-ceiling plan that could meet with enough support from both parties to move to President Obama's desk by Aug. 2. McConnell, on CNN's "State of the Union," described a $3-trillion package that included cuts in discretionary spending, caps on future spending and a vote on a balanced budget amendment.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, the esteemed (well, OK, by some) Democrat from Nevada, wants his GOP counterparts to play ball. But Republicans, led by Kentucky's esteemed (well, OK, by some others) Mitch McConnell, mostly want to take their ball and go home. The result, perhaps, is that next week, the age-old Senate tradition of the filibuster will be radically reshaped. As in, you won't be able use it anymore to hold up votes on presidential nominees. And you know what? Probably most Americans don't care.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2013 | By David Horsey
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will not be facing a challenge from actress Ashley Judd when he runs for reelection next year. Though he may be happy to have avoided the physical comparison -- she, after all, played Marilyn Monroe in a movie, while he looks like an ancient sea turtle dressed in a $1,000 suit -- the Kentucky Republican may miss having such an attractive target for his attack machine. McConnell is not all that popular back home. Democrats, of course, can't stand him and tea party Republicans may like him even less.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON -- If the battle lines of the next budget fight between the White House and Congress were not already clear, Mitch McConnell underscored them in emphatic terms Sunday. With three looming fiscal deadlines in the coming months, the Republican Senate minority leader made clear in a round of interviews on the Sunday morning talk shows that the GOP will not consider further tax increases to help pay down the nation's debt. “The tax issue is finished, over, completed,” McConnell said on ABC's “This Week.” “That's behind us. Now the question is, what are we going to do about the biggest problem confronting our country and our future?
NATIONAL
December 26, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - This time of year, Republican leader Mitch McConnell's office suite, steps away from the Senate floor, often crackles with a fire in the hearth. On Wednesday, it sat shuttered and almost empty. The cold stillness captured the state of affairs as senators and President Obama prepared to return to work Thursday facing an imminent deadline to avoid across-the-board tax increases and large spending cuts scheduled to take effect Tuesday. McConnell would play the key role in any effort to avoid that so-called fiscal cliff.
OPINION
July 12, 2012
The late Strom Thurmond is best known for his 48 years in the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina, his segregationist candidacy for the presidency in 1948 and the fact that even though he was a longtime opponent of racial equality, he fathered a child with a black teenage housekeeper. But Thurmond also lent his name to the so-called Thurmond Rule, according to which Senate action on judicial confirmations is supposed to stop several months before a presidential election. The rule - actually a custom that sometimes has been honored in the breach - goes back to 1968, when Thurmond and other Republicans held up action on President Johnson's nomination of Abe Fortas to be chief justice of the United States.
OPINION
June 20, 2012
In its reckless Citizens United decision in 2010, the Supreme Court divided 5 to 4 in holding that corporations could spend unlimited funds to influence elections. But in the same case, eight justices agreed that it was constitutional for Congress to require disclosure of the identities of those who paid for political advertising. In a part of his opinion joined by every member of the court except Clarence Thomas, JusticeAnthony M. Kennedy wrote: "The 1st Amendment protects political speech; and disclosure permits citizens and shareholders to react to the speech of corporate entities in a proper way. This transparency enables the electorate to make informed decisions and give proper weight to different speakers and messages.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, the esteemed (well, OK, by some) Democrat from Nevada, wants his GOP counterparts to play ball. But Republicans, led by Kentucky's esteemed (well, OK, by some others) Mitch McConnell, mostly want to take their ball and go home. The result, perhaps, is that next week, the age-old Senate tradition of the filibuster will be radically reshaped. As in, you won't be able use it anymore to hold up votes on presidential nominees. And you know what? Probably most Americans don't care.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2013 | By David Horsey
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will not be facing a challenge from actress Ashley Judd when he runs for reelection next year. Though he may be happy to have avoided the physical comparison -- she, after all, played Marilyn Monroe in a movie, while he looks like an ancient sea turtle dressed in a $1,000 suit -- the Kentucky Republican may miss having such an attractive target for his attack machine. McConnell is not all that popular back home. Democrats, of course, can't stand him and tea party Republicans may like him even less.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
The Republican leader of the Senate says that if Iran were found to be enriching uranium to weapons-grade levels, he would introduce legislation to authorize  military force to prevent the country from possessing a nuclear arm, according to excerpts of the senator's speech to the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee. Sen. Mitch McConnell, of Kentucky, says he believes the the Obama administration's insistence that all options are on the table in dealing with Iran has "lost its intended purpose" as a threat.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) vowed Sunday to fight the administration's requirement that insurers provide contraceptive coverage for faith-based employers. McConnell said on CBS' "Face the Nation" that he would press legislation to exempt all employers from providing insurance coverage for contraceptives if they have religious or moral objections. "We'll be voting on that in the Senate, and you can anticipate that would happen as soon as possible.…This issue will not go away until the administration simply backs down," he said.
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