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Mitchell Caverns Natural Preserve

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NEWS
April 26, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN and GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Artists creating an on-location set for Academy Award-winning filmmaker Oliver Stone have defaced a natural limestone cavern in the eastern Mojave Desert, painting its pristine walls with phony Indian pictographs that workers have so far been unable to remove.
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NEWS
March 2, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the release this week of the Oliver Stone film, "The Doors," rangers at this remote Mojave Desert park expect the number of visitors to increase considerably. In the film, Val Kilmer portrays a doped-up Jim Morrison--the enigmatic lead singer of the 1960s rock group the Doors--encountering a holy man in a cave filled with mysterious prehistoric-looking Indian drawings.
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TRAVEL
April 30, 1989 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms are free-lance writers/photographers living in Laguna Beach.
When hard times during the Depression in 1932 forced Ida and Jack Mitchell to leave Los Angeles, they headed to the Mojave Desert. A new home was established 4,300 feet in the Providence Mountains, where Jack had been prospecting for silver and had bought some caverns. The Mitchells thought tourists might pay to look at the stalactites, stalagmites and other intricate limestone formations, so they built a dirt road to the site and erected stone buildings where visitors could spend the night.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using an anti-graffiti cleanser, workers have begun scrubbing the walls of a Mojave Desert limestone cave inadvertently defaced by artists creating an on-location set for filmmaker Oliver Stone. State park officials said the cleansing process--which uses water, a nontoxic citrus-based detergent and a soft-bristle brush--should safely strip Mitchell Caverns of the 100 fake Indian pictographs applied by artists creating a backdrop for "The Doors," a film about rock legend Jim Morrison.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using an anti-graffiti cleanser, workers have begun scrubbing the walls of a Mojave Desert limestone cave inadvertently defaced by artists creating an on-location set for filmmaker Oliver Stone. State park officials said the cleansing process--which uses water, a nontoxic citrus-based detergent and a soft-bristle brush--should safely strip Mitchell Caverns of the 100 fake Indian pictographs applied by artists creating a backdrop for "The Doors," a film about rock legend Jim Morrison.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the release this week of the Oliver Stone film, "The Doors," rangers at this remote Mojave Desert park expect the number of visitors to increase considerably. In the film, Val Kilmer portrays a doped-up Jim Morrison--the enigmatic lead singer of the 1960s rock group the Doors--encountering a holy man in a cave filled with mysterious prehistoric-looking Indian drawings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Environmentalists asked the filmmakers to go shoot elsewhere. But the movie company believed the mountainous setting was a perfect location. The Bureau of Land Management agreed under certain conditions, and issued the filmmakers a permit. Now, none of the parties appears satisfied.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN and GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Artists creating an on-location set for Academy Award-winning filmmaker Oliver Stone have defaced a natural limestone cavern in the eastern Mojave Desert, painting its pristine walls with phony Indian pictographs that workers have so far been unable to remove.
TRAVEL
April 30, 1989 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms are free-lance writers/photographers living in Laguna Beach.
When hard times during the Depression in 1932 forced Ida and Jack Mitchell to leave Los Angeles, they headed to the Mojave Desert. A new home was established 4,300 feet in the Providence Mountains, where Jack had been prospecting for silver and had bought some caverns. The Mitchells thought tourists might pay to look at the stalactites, stalagmites and other intricate limestone formations, so they built a dirt road to the site and erected stone buildings where visitors could spend the night.
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