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Mohamed Ali Seineldin

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NEWS
December 7, 1988 | From Reuters
Mohamed Ali Seineldin, who officially surrendered Tuesday as leader of the military revolt in Argentina, is an army colonel of Lebanese descent who commanded an infantry regiment in the 1982 Falklands War with Britain. He is regarded as the ideological mentor of Aldo Rico, a lieutenant colonel who led two unsuccessful rebellions against the army command in April, 1987, and January of this year.
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NEWS
November 2, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Military politics, a perennial preoccupation in Argentina, is producing a new rash of problems for the civilian government of President Carlos Saul Menem. The latest focus of trouble is Mohammed Ali Seineldin, a suspended army colonel who led an abortive barracks revolt in December, 1988. He served nine months in detention for that affair but has since returned to the arena of military politics. On Oct. 20, Seineldin delivered an ominous letter to Menem's official residence.
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NEWS
December 7, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin said Tuesday that by refusing to negotiate with army mutineers, the Argentine government repulsed "an attack against the sovereignty of the people and the institutions of the nation." The leader of the four-day revolt, right-wing Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, was taken into custody earlier in the day after surrendering control of his several hundred rebels, most of whom were allowed to return to their units.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Developments in Panama, racked by political turmoil since last Sunday's election, struck a sympathetic chord Friday in Argentina. There is to be a presidential election in this country Sunday, and a public opinion poll showed that the No. 1 concern of young Argentines is fear of a military coup. Much of this concern is focused on an Argentine army officer, Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, who slipped back into Argentina in December, 1988, after serving as a military adviser in Panama.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Thirty hours after capitulating, the leader of an army uprising finally delivered control of his troops to a loyalist general Monday night, calming fears that the insurrection had not yet been quelled. A rebel officer at the army base told reporters that Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin "put himself at the disposition of the competent military judge" and will be transferred this morning to a place designated for his formal arrest. Gen.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Surrounded by tanks poised to attack, hundreds of mutinous Argentine soldiers gave up their three-day insurrection Sunday without winning a single concession, the government said. Officials vehemently denied an array of reports that the right-wing leader of the uprising, Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, had surrendered in return for the resignation of the army's top commander, Gen. Jose Dante Caridi.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Developments in Panama, racked by political turmoil since last Sunday's election, struck a sympathetic chord Friday in Argentina. There is to be a presidential election in this country Sunday, and a public opinion poll showed that the No. 1 concern of young Argentines is fear of a military coup. Much of this concern is focused on an Argentine army officer, Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, who slipped back into Argentina in December, 1988, after serving as a military adviser in Panama.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Military politics, a perennial preoccupation in Argentina, is producing a new rash of problems for the civilian government of President Carlos Saul Menem. The latest focus of trouble is Mohammed Ali Seineldin, a suspended army colonel who led an abortive barracks revolt in December, 1988. He served nine months in detention for that affair but has since returned to the arena of military politics. On Oct. 20, Seineldin delivered an ominous letter to Menem's official residence.
NEWS
January 26, 1989
Argentine guerrillas who seized a military base and fought off troops for nearly 30 hours had hoped to ignite a popular uprising and forestall a military coup, the government said. Officials released a rebel statement calling on Argentines to unite against a military coup supposedly being planned by followers of Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin and former Lt. Col. Aldo Rico, both imprisoned for leading military rebellions against the government of President Raul Alfonsin.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebellious faction of Argentine officers staged a bloody but unsuccessful anti-government uprising Monday, two days before a scheduled visit here by President Bush. Rebels seized the army headquarters in downtown Buenos Aires, a block from the presidential palace, and three other military installations, battling troops loyal to the government throughout the day. The hostilities included heavy rifle fire, cannon shots and even aerial bombing of rebel tanks.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin said Tuesday that by refusing to negotiate with army mutineers, the Argentine government repulsed "an attack against the sovereignty of the people and the institutions of the nation." The leader of the four-day revolt, right-wing Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, was taken into custody earlier in the day after surrendering control of his several hundred rebels, most of whom were allowed to return to their units.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | From Reuters
Mohamed Ali Seineldin, who officially surrendered Tuesday as leader of the military revolt in Argentina, is an army colonel of Lebanese descent who commanded an infantry regiment in the 1982 Falklands War with Britain. He is regarded as the ideological mentor of Aldo Rico, a lieutenant colonel who led two unsuccessful rebellions against the army command in April, 1987, and January of this year.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Thirty hours after capitulating, the leader of an army uprising finally delivered control of his troops to a loyalist general Monday night, calming fears that the insurrection had not yet been quelled. A rebel officer at the army base told reporters that Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin "put himself at the disposition of the competent military judge" and will be transferred this morning to a place designated for his formal arrest. Gen.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Surrounded by tanks poised to attack, hundreds of mutinous Argentine soldiers gave up their three-day insurrection Sunday without winning a single concession, the government said. Officials vehemently denied an array of reports that the right-wing leader of the uprising, Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, had surrendered in return for the resignation of the army's top commander, Gen. Jose Dante Caridi.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | United Press International
Army officers demanding amnesty for imprisoned former military junta members seized part of a strategic base outside Buenos Aires today and attempted to storm the prison where the former officials are held. The government said that dissident officers took control of the infantry school at the Campo de Mayo military base today in the third such rebellion against the government of President Raul Alfonsin since April, 1987.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | Associated Press
The chiefs of Argentina's army, air force and navy resigned Tuesday, the army high command said in a statement. The moves came amid charges that the army commander made a deal with military rebels to end a four-day revolt earlier this month. The resignations appeared to be concessions to the mutineers and pose military and political problems for President Raul Alfonsin as he campaigns for May 14 presidential elections.
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