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Moises Kaufman

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February 15, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
'The truth," wrote Oscar Wilde, "is rarely pure and never simple." That's the epigram that prefaces the published version of Moises Kaufman's play "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde." And it's also the artistic ethic that drives this highly acclaimed drama, which opens at the Mark Taper Forum on Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
As Jane Fonda strides across the marble entranceway of the 1940s hillside home she shares with her boyfriend, music producer Richard Perry, she's already explaining her most recent break with convention: their living situation. "I have an apartment over there," she says pointing out the window to a building in the distance, rising up from the neon blur of city lights below. "But I've never slept there. I never thought this is where I'd be at this point in my life ? 73, shacked up with somebody in the music business," she laughs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2008
Broadway bound: After an absence of 46 years, Oscar-winner Jane Fonda will return to Broadway next year as the star of "33 Variations," a play by Moises Kaufman about a musicologist studying Beethoven's fascination with a particular piece of music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
The soft whistle of a passing breeze echoed through the performance space. On stage, a group of men swayed against a backdrop of Wyoming's hills, as though they were at the mercy of the wind. They moved faintly side to side, side to side. The image resonated throughout the Monday night performance of "The Laramie Project, Ten Years Later . . . an Epilogue" at the Eli and Edythe Broad Stage. The Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles, which presented the production with Speak Theater Arts and the Broad Stage, opened the show with this rhythmic motion, symbolic of a deeper struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2004 | Mike Boehm
Stage director Moises Kaufman didn't do too badly with his last foray into Germanic subject matter: He directed Doug Wright's "I Am My Own Wife," which won this year's Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award for best play with its depiction of the life and times of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, who managed to survive both the Nazis and the East German communists while living in Berlin as a cross-dressing, openly gay man.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
The soft whistle of a passing breeze echoed through the performance space. On stage, a group of men swayed against a backdrop of Wyoming's hills, as though they were at the mercy of the wind. They moved faintly side to side, side to side. The image resonated throughout the Monday night performance of "The Laramie Project, Ten Years Later . . . an Epilogue" at the Eli and Edythe Broad Stage. The Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles, which presented the production with Speak Theater Arts and the Broad Stage, opened the show with this rhythmic motion, symbolic of a deeper struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
LA JOLLA -- There's a reason why there are so few memorable works about the births of artistic masterpieces: The creative process is boring. Writers, painters and musicians dawdle interminably over details and decisions that common mortals simply don't have the patience, not to say masochism, for. Playwright and director Moises Kaufman ("The Laramie Project" and "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde"), however, is always up for a challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The word "honorable" doesn't hold much adjectival currency these days. Even when it isn't used dismissively ("honorable failure," "honorable bore"), it connotes noble aims and good manners, a good-for-you experience without much vitality. But in a smart, bracing way, "The Laramie Project" restores honor to that word "honorable."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
As Jane Fonda strides across the marble entranceway of the 1940s hillside home she shares with her boyfriend, music producer Richard Perry, she's already explaining her most recent break with convention: their living situation. "I have an apartment over there," she says pointing out the window to a building in the distance, rising up from the neon blur of city lights below. "But I've never slept there. I never thought this is where I'd be at this point in my life ? 73, shacked up with somebody in the music business," she laughs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2006 | From Associated Press
"Macbeth" -- the Shakespeare tragedy no one mentions by name in a theater because of bad luck -- will be performed this summer in New York's Central Park, starring Liev Schreiber as the title character and Jennifer Ehle as Lady Macbeth. The free Public Theater production, to be directed by Moises Kaufman, will begin June 13 at the Delacorte Theater and run through July 9. For tickets, visit www.publictheater.org
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2008
Broadway bound: After an absence of 46 years, Oscar-winner Jane Fonda will return to Broadway next year as the star of "33 Variations," a play by Moises Kaufman about a musicologist studying Beethoven's fascination with a particular piece of music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
LA JOLLA -- There's a reason why there are so few memorable works about the births of artistic masterpieces: The creative process is boring. Writers, painters and musicians dawdle interminably over details and decisions that common mortals simply don't have the patience, not to say masochism, for. Playwright and director Moises Kaufman ("The Laramie Project" and "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde"), however, is always up for a challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2004 | Mike Boehm
Stage director Moises Kaufman didn't do too badly with his last foray into Germanic subject matter: He directed Doug Wright's "I Am My Own Wife," which won this year's Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award for best play with its depiction of the life and times of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, who managed to survive both the Nazis and the East German communists while living in Berlin as a cross-dressing, openly gay man.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The word "honorable" doesn't hold much adjectival currency these days. Even when it isn't used dismissively ("honorable failure," "honorable bore"), it connotes noble aims and good manners, a good-for-you experience without much vitality. But in a smart, bracing way, "The Laramie Project" restores honor to that word "honorable."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
'The truth," wrote Oscar Wilde, "is rarely pure and never simple." That's the epigram that prefaces the published version of Moises Kaufman's play "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde." And it's also the artistic ethic that drives this highly acclaimed drama, which opens at the Mark Taper Forum on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1998
Theater Moises Kaufman's "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde," chronicling the writer's sensational 19th century prosecution for homosexuality, ends Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Today-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 2:30 p.m. $29-$37. (213) 628-2772. Comedy Comedian Bruce Smirnoff's one-man show of entertainment industry horror stories, "Other Than My Health I Have Nothing . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1998
* Theater. Anne Meara's comedy "After-Play," with Beatrice Arthur, Paul Dooley, Robert Mandan and Marian Mercer, opens Feb. 17 at the Can~on Theatre, 205 N. Can~on Drive, Beverly Hills, playing Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 p.m.; Sundays, 3 p.m. Also Feb. 26, 2 p.m.; dark Wednesdays until March 4. $25-$42.50. (310) 859-2830. * Theater. "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde," by Moises Kaufman, opens Feb. 19 at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave.
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