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TRAVEL
March 3, 2013 | By Vani Rangachar
People travel to the Mojave expecting arid crags, tortured landscapes and vast expanses. But water? Not so much. On a recent winter trip to the Mojave, I stumbled on a new desert lure: bubbling springs, creeks and even a river, the Amargosa. My husband, Barry, and I followed a watery trail through the hamlets of Shoshone and Tecopa Hot Springs, in the seam of desert between Death Valley National Park and the Nevada border. The bed Don't expect turn-down service. First up was the Shoshone Inn , a cinder-block motel on California Highway 127 in Shoshone ([760]
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Chris Lee
There are certain long-dormant rock acts and broken-up bands that cause fans to wring their hands in anticipation of musical detente. These are bands that fairly demand to be reunited in the service of a career-defining set at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. And then there was the Cult's performance on opening night of the fest's second weekend: an exercise in Dad Rock gone wrong that left most of its audience dazed and disappointed with the British band's baffling decision to omit most of its biggest hits in favor of catalog fare and new “compositions” that left the faithful scratching their heads.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A tip from an informant has led investigators to three classic cars stolen over a decade ago in Los Angeles. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Jeff Enfield said the information led investigators to a home in Mojave, where they served a search warrant on Oct. 23. There they found a 1965 Buick Riviera, a 1984 Cadillac Coupe De Ville and a 1987 Buick Grand National that had all been stolen in 2002. "They were all operable and in good working condition," Enfield said, adding that the Buick Riviera is probably worth $40,000, the Grand National worth about $20,000 and the Coupe De Ville around $8,000 or $10,000.
OPINION
March 26, 2014 | By Mark Butler
After nearly 38 years working for the National Park Service, I hung up my "flat hat" this month and retired as superintendent of Joshua Tree National Park. That means I can now speak out against pending proposals with the potential to harm our country's most spectacular national parks in the California desert. My experience in the National Park System began right out of high school, when I spent a season patrolling the mountainous trails of Yosemite National Park's backcountry as a wilderness ranger.
TRAVEL
February 28, 2010 | Benoit LeBourgeois
The valleys and hillsides of the Southern California deserts have been preparing all winter for their close-up. Silent and forlorn, often harsh and austere, they're ready to shed their mantle of earth tones and dress themselves in wildflowers, thanks to the rain storms and subsequent warm days. Here's a look at what's unfolding in some of Southern California's best natural settings. If you go These five parks regularly update wildflower reports on their websites during viewing season.
SPORTS
November 27, 1999 | GILLEE SHERMAN
In another Division XII quarterfinal: Kilpatrick 18, Mojave 12--Jermaine Marshall rushed for 181 yards and one touchdown in 24 carries for Kilpatrick (8-4) at Canoga Park High. Marshall's 15-yard scoring run capped a 72-yard drive to open the third quarter and gave Kilpatrick a 16-6 lead. Kilpatrick was penalized 15 times for 109 yards and lost three fumbles, allowing Mojave (10-2) to stay close. Dominic Snelson sealed the victory, intercepting a Mojave pass with under two minutes to play.
OPINION
February 7, 1988
In response to "Decline in Desert Tortoise Spells Bad News for the Mojave" (Part I, Jan. 26): It seems that human activity in the desert is incompatible with the continued existence of many unique desert species of wildlife. It is especially sad when signs posted saying "Wildlife Preserve" seem to inspire some people to attack anything that moves with guns and/or clubs. A possible solution is the creation of a large desert national park such as the East Mojave Desert National Park proposed by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | JACK SMITH
Two weekends ago my wife and I drove up to Weldon, in the Kern River Valley, where I was scheduled to talk at a luncheon of the Kern Valley Library Fund Raising Committee. It was a long way to go to deliver a casual talk, but I spent some of my early childhood in Kern County libraries, and I have tried to pay them back. The luncheon was scheduled for noon on a Friday at the South Fork Women's Club, in Weldon.
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
For the next installment of our Handmade Holiday Gift Guide, we turn to the Ojai Art Festival, running through Nov. 24 -- a celebration of work made from trash and meant to provoke questions about waste. That's where, if you're lucky, you'll see the barbed wire baskets of Karl Vidstrand. The artist scavenges in the Mojave, near where he lives, for the desert detritus that accents his pieces. What's intriguing about the resulting designs is that they subversively prevent each basket from performing its function: holding stuff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1999
Re "Reaching Way Out," Sept. 18: I disagree with UCLA sociologist Warren TenHouten, who considers it "pitiful" to call a phone booth in the middle of the desert and wonders, "What's the most interesting thing that could happen?" Thirty years ago my mother's college roommate dared her to make a crank call to a number they found on the floor of a public phone booth. That random connection became my father. I will always be grateful for the serendipity triggered by one anonymous pay telephone; I suspect that those who call and those who pick up the lonely Mojave phone share my appreciation for such intersections of will and fate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
TECOPA, Calif. - Under a canopy of gleaming stars, Janet Foley made her way across a dab of marshlands surrounded by harsh Mojave Desert terrain, her headlamp fixed on a live trap the size of a loaf of bread. She peered inside, smiled and said, "Hi there, cutie. " The creature staring back at her was a federally endangered Amargosa vole, one of the rarest mammals in North America. Foley recorded its vital statistics, attached an identification tag to its right ear and released it back into the wild.
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
For the next installment of our Handmade Holiday Gift Guide, we turn to the Ojai Art Festival, running through Nov. 24 -- a celebration of work made from trash and meant to provoke questions about waste. That's where, if you're lucky, you'll see the barbed wire baskets of Karl Vidstrand. The artist scavenges in the Mojave, near where he lives, for the desert detritus that accents his pieces. What's intriguing about the resulting designs is that they subversively prevent each basket from performing its function: holding stuff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A tip from an informant has led investigators to three classic cars stolen over a decade ago in Los Angeles. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Jeff Enfield said the information led investigators to a home in Mojave, where they served a search warrant on Oct. 23. There they found a 1965 Buick Riviera, a 1984 Cadillac Coupe De Ville and a 1987 Buick Grand National that had all been stolen in 2002. "They were all operable and in good working condition," Enfield said, adding that the Buick Riviera is probably worth $40,000, the Grand National worth about $20,000 and the Coupe De Ville around $8,000 or $10,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Richard Winton and Ruben Vives
The man called Ridgecrest police early Friday morning with a warning: He planned to "wreak havoc" on the Central California community. Less than three hours later, the caller - already suspected of killing one person and wounding another - lived up to his word. He led authorities on a high-speed, 35-mile chase on a Mojave Desert highway, shooting at authorities and other vehicles and forcing drivers off the road. At some point, the gunman's trunk popped open, revealing a man and woman inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have discovered four new species of legless lizards in California, including one species that lives beneath the sand dunes near Los Angeles International Airport. But before we go on, let's get one thing straight: Yes, a snake is a legless lizard, but not all legless lizards are snakes. Throughout the history of lizard evolution, several lizard lineages have lost their legs, James Parham of Cal State Fullerton said. Snakes are the best-known and most diverse of these lineages, but more than 200 other types of limbless lizards exist throughout the world.
OPINION
July 22, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Wind turbines tend to be overshadowed by solar power projects, which get most of the attention from the public and policymakers. That's the case again in a new government plan for renewable energy projects in the California desert. Though the wind industry shouldn't get all the land it wants, the desert master plan should provide more and better space for wind farms. Despite its second-class status, wind is a much bigger producer of electricity than solar. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, wind is now the source of 3.5% of the nation's electricity supply.
OPINION
September 29, 2008
Re "Lone rangers in a hostile land," Sept. 25 The description of the methamphetamine labs and train robbers in Mojave National Preserve was entertaining -- and troubling. The National Parks Conservation Assn. salutes The Times for highlighting some of the challenges this park faces. We would also like to add a few facts: The preserve was established to protect a unique cultural and natural landscape for the American people, and it allows us all to experience singing sand dunes, rock art sites that date back 8,000 years, the world's largest and densest Joshua tree forest and wild animals such as desert tortoises, Mojave fringe-toed lizards, prairie falcons, mountain lions, California condors and desert bighorn sheep.
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Ken Schwencke, Los Angeles Times
A shallow magnitude 3.3 earthquake was reported Saturday evening 11 miles from Ft. Irwin in California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 6:58 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 1.9 mile. According to the USGS, the epicenter was 20 miles from Barstow, 22 miles from Barstow Heights, 48 miles from Apple Valley and 295 miles from Phoenix. In the last 10 days, there have been no other earthquakes magnitude 3.0 and greater centered nearby. Read more about Southern California earthquakes .
SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The Kelso Depot Visitor Center in Mojave National Preserve, the park's popular historic site, is about to be affected by federal spending cuts. Starting next week, the visitor center will be closed on Wednesdays and Thursdays. The visitor center will remain open Fridays through Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cutbacks are part of across-the-board federal spending cuts, also known as sequestration. Park officials said the budget rollbacks reduced the number of seasonal workers who would have staffed the recently reopened train depot.
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