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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1993
We in San Bernardino County are again embarrassed by Lewis' misstatement that 20,000 mining jobs will be lost if the Mojave National Park is established. Apparently, Lewis doesn't know that there are less than 1,000 existing mining jobs in all of San Bernardino County, and that there are only two active commercial mines within the proposed park that together employ less than 200 miners. None of these jobs will be lost by the legislation. The 1.5-million-acre Mojave National Park will be a huge windfall economically to our depressed area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1994
Re "House Vote Downgrades Desert Land Status," July 13: The vote to designate the East Mojave Desert a preserve rather than a national park is a victory for wildlife. For decades now the California Department of Fish and Game has been doing an exemplary job of managing our state's wild sheep population. From near-extinction a century ago, bighorn sheep have increased in number to over 5,000. With continued management it could be only a matter of years before we see twice that number of sheep in our mountains.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1988
Sen. Wilson's concern over the "lock out" of the California desert raises an interesting point. Opponents who decry the East Mojave as undeserving of national park status seem most eager to tour the area themselves. But "access" is a multifaceted issue. In a very few years both the Sierra Club's foot soldiers and the four-wheel drive community will be supplanted by tens-of-thousands of vacationers who wish merely to visit the area and recreate accordingly. Who is to provide the level of interpretation, services and facilities--the "access"--to which the American public is accustomed?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994
Plans to create a Mojave National Park have become entwined with complex national politics that have nothing to do with preserving the California desert. The House Tuesday voted to downgrade the 1.2-million-acre tract in the Mojave to a national "preserve," still run by the National Park Service but open to hunters . Having rebuffed the National Rifle Assn. on the Brady and assault gun bills, many in Congress wanted to avoid another fight with the gun lobby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1989
What fool would pose such a question: "Should we allow a foreign interest to extract gold from the American soil of a proposed national park and leave us a seething, cyanide-laced toxic pit?" At best, the popularity of such a proposal is laughable. Unfortunately, the humor is lost both on the Bureau of Land Management as well as to our archaic and permissive General Mining Law of 1872. The responses which predictably range from shock to incredulous disbelief tell us that Californians are not humored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993
Feinstein's decision to make the protection of the California desert her first legislative effort is right on target. The Reagan/Bush administrations, with Sens. Wilson and Seymour in league, failed to provide any leadership to address the well-documented need to set aside wilderness areas and to designate Death Valley and Joshua Tree as national parks and create the Mojave National Park. Feinstein's critics are the usual suspects. Off-road vehicle owners who don't want any restrictions on their roaring across the fragile desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1989
Your editorial repeats several statements from the testimony of Rep. Richard Lehman (D-Fresno) at the recent House subcommittee hearing on the California Desert Protection Act about the creation of the proposed Mojave National Park. These statements are likely to leave an incorrect impression of the facts. Lehman states that the area of the proposed park "is crisscrossed by seven transmission lines, gas corridors, two interstate highways and railroads." In fact, there are only three power transmission corridors and two gas pipelines within the boundary of the proposed park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994
Plans to create a Mojave National Park have become entwined with complex national politics that have nothing to do with preserving the California desert. The House Tuesday voted to downgrade the 1.2-million-acre tract in the Mojave to a national "preserve," still run by the National Park Service but open to hunters . Having rebuffed the National Rifle Assn. on the Brady and assault gun bills, many in Congress wanted to avoid another fight with the gun lobby.
OPINION
March 6, 1994
The odyssey of the California Desert Protection Act through Congress threatens to become as long and torturous as the 19th-Century desert crossings of westbound pioneers. The act would save special natural places from human-caused degradation. It would create the largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states, enlarging both Death Valley and Joshua Tree national monuments and upgrading them to national park status. The legislation also is intended to create a 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1994
Re "House Vote Downgrades Desert Land Status," July 13: The vote to designate the East Mojave Desert a preserve rather than a national park is a victory for wildlife. For decades now the California Department of Fish and Game has been doing an exemplary job of managing our state's wild sheep population. From near-extinction a century ago, bighorn sheep have increased in number to over 5,000. With continued management it could be only a matter of years before we see twice that number of sheep in our mountains.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, in a victory for a group of determined Southern California Republicans, on Tuesday approved an amendment to the California Desert Protection Act that downgrades a proposed national park in the East Mojave to "preserve" status and allows hunting to continue in the rugged area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1994
The Times was on the mark in its editorial (April 18) concerning the status of the California Desert Protection Act. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has been truly masterful in moving this landmark bill through the U.S. Senate. The strong, bipartisan Senate vote of 69-29 is testament to her negotiating skills. Most importantly, while meeting the needs of a wide range of desert interests, Sen. Feinstein has produced a bill which maintains a strong sense of integrity. The bill now moves to the House of Representatives.
OPINION
March 6, 1994
The odyssey of the California Desert Protection Act through Congress threatens to become as long and torturous as the 19th-Century desert crossings of westbound pioneers. The act would save special natural places from human-caused degradation. It would create the largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states, enlarging both Death Valley and Joshua Tree national monuments and upgrading them to national park status. The legislation also is intended to create a 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1993
We in San Bernardino County are again embarrassed by Lewis' misstatement that 20,000 mining jobs will be lost if the Mojave National Park is established. Apparently, Lewis doesn't know that there are less than 1,000 existing mining jobs in all of San Bernardino County, and that there are only two active commercial mines within the proposed park that together employ less than 200 miners. None of these jobs will be lost by the legislation. The 1.5-million-acre Mojave National Park will be a huge windfall economically to our depressed area.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | HOWARD LIBIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Dianne Feinstein indicated Tuesday she may be willing to compromise on the California desert bill in the face of opposition from Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-Redlands), an influential moderate with a solid environmental record. Lewis, whose district includes desert lands, described the legislation at a hearing as "the Feinstein California Unemployment Act of 1993" and predicted it would alter or eliminate as many as 20,000 mining industry jobs, most of them in the proposed East Mojave national park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993
Feinstein's decision to make the protection of the California desert her first legislative effort is right on target. The Reagan/Bush administrations, with Sens. Wilson and Seymour in league, failed to provide any leadership to address the well-documented need to set aside wilderness areas and to designate Death Valley and Joshua Tree as national parks and create the Mojave National Park. Feinstein's critics are the usual suspects. Off-road vehicle owners who don't want any restrictions on their roaring across the fragile desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1994
The Times was on the mark in its editorial (April 18) concerning the status of the California Desert Protection Act. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has been truly masterful in moving this landmark bill through the U.S. Senate. The strong, bipartisan Senate vote of 69-29 is testament to her negotiating skills. Most importantly, while meeting the needs of a wide range of desert interests, Sen. Feinstein has produced a bill which maintains a strong sense of integrity. The bill now moves to the House of Representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989
Times' contributor David Glidden opines "Who would have imagined, a century ago, that settlers would one day see the California desert as a place to be revered and left alone?" ("Desert: Protection From the People," Opinion, Oct. 22). But Glidden fails to conjure eloquently on the pioneers' summarized reaction to a myriad of multi-abuse activities currently despoiling a once supremely pristine region. Would the settlers be disgusted by the endless number of non-regenerating gouges into the vulnerable flora by irresponsible off-road vehicle owners?
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