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Molecular Biosystems Inc

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BUSINESS
May 12, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
From its founding in 1980 until late last year, Molecular Biosystems Inc. did not generate much excitement on Wall Street. The San Diego-based biotechnology company had posted net losses every year since its inception and was viewed in some corners as just one company among many striving to produce DNA probe-based medical diagnostic kits. A $2.5-million investment by E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.
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BUSINESS
May 26, 1992
Here are the highest-paid executives among San Diego County's publicly owned companies. Name Title Company 1 Robert E. Draper P National Health Labs 2 Thomas A. Page COB,P,CEO SDG&E 3 Thomas J. Wageman P, CEO HomeFed Corp 4 Arnold L. Johnson P,CEO Magma Power Co 5 R.H. Goldsmith COB,CEO Rohr Industries Inc 6 Bernard E. Statland VP National Health Labs 7 Walter J. Zable COB,P,CEO Cubic Corp 8 Jack E. Thomas EVP,COO SDG&E 9 John F. Markus VP National Health Labs 10 David C.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The Times 100 list of California's most profitable companies includes two newcomers from San Diego County this year, as well as three disappearances in a reshuffling that once again illustrates the turmoil that has characterized corporate leadership here over the past decade. The new San Diego names on the list, which ranks the state's top companies according to two-year average return on equity, are National Health Laboratories (No.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1991 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The landscape in the land of the loved hasn't changed much in the last year, proving that investors can indeed be faithful, particularly when their affections are returned. And lately they have been returned with a vengeance. In 1990 Wall Street smiled on biotechnology stocks, and biotech responded by fulfilling the promises it made more than a decade ago: products, profitability and a prosperous future. "Have you seen what these stocks have done these last two years?" asked Peter F.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Like comedian Rodney Dangerfield, many California companies get no respect--from Wall Street. For a variety of reasons, investors have stayed away from these companies. In some cases, these "lowest-priced" companies, as measured by the market value-to-book value ratio, are still haunted by past failures. Sometimes, investors have good reason to be wary. (The combined worth of a company's stock determines market value. Book value is the value that a firm's assets are carried on its balance sheet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Armed with engineered molecules that turn them into DNA detectives, scientists working in San Diego say they are on the verge of a day when physicians will be able to use these sophisticated techniques to both diagnose and guide the treatment of human disease. These "DNA probes" lock onto unique fragments of genetic material from invading viruses or bacteria.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is no faster way to grow than buying another company--that's why you hear a lot about corporate takeovers. And in 1994, it seems, buying was the way to grow. Like last year's Times 100 growth chart-topper Mycogen Corp., a San Diego biotechnology concern, several of the leaders in the 1994 Times Growth 100 are firms that spent last year buying other companies. Here's a look at how California companies grew last year. First, a few that took over other companies: ThermoLase Corp.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
San Diego's only two companies on this year's Times 100--lubricant manufacturer WD-40 in the 12th spot and discount warehouse operator Price Co. in at 39th--have proven themselves durable leaders in the world of retailing. Detractors have been saying for years that WD-40's familiar blue cans of lubricant and Price's chain of membership-only shopping depots were concepts too simple to withstand the inevitable onslaught of competition. Yet both companies remain prosperous, growing and two of the state's top-performing companies in terms of return on equity over a two-year period.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The number of San Diego County companies on The Times 100 list jumped to six in 1990, up from only two in the previous two years. Two of the leaders on the two-year average return on equity list, which was developed by MZ Group of San Francisco, are old standbys: WD-40, the manufacturer of the familiar all-purpose lubricant that comes in the blue and yellow can, and Price Co., the inventor of the membership warehouse concept, which now has 67 locations nationwide and in Canada.
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