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Mollusks

FOOD
June 6, 1991 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The greatest risk of food poisoning is in eating raw oysters or clams, according to a recent federal advisory. According to figures developed jointly by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control, one out of every 1,000 people who consume raw or undercooked molluskan shellfish--oysters, clams or mussels--may become ill, some seriously. By comparison, one out of every 25,000 servings of cooked chicken is expected to cause an illness.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
As ranchers go, Tracy Brash and Michael Beyries count among the country's smallest--and largest. Their feedlot, where livestock is fattened, is compact enough to fit comfortably within a 25-acre dairy farm. Squeezed into that space, however, are about 750,000 head on the hoof. Indeed, this livestock appears to be nothing but head and hoof. Brash and Beyries are snail ranchers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pounding surf, dive-bombing birds and howling wind hardly seem a safe environment for a nursery, but Ventura County beaches have become a crib for a clam comeback the likes of which hasn't been seen in years, scientists say. A fortuitous alignment of environmental conditions is leading to a clam population explosion. Go to the right beach at low tide, turn a spadeful of wet sand and odds are you will uncover dozens of the bottom-hugging sea creatures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2005 | Claudia Zequeira, Times Staff Writer
More dead jumbo squid are washing up along Orange County's coastline, and although that's bad news for the creatures, it's good news for scientists eager to learn more about the mysterious deep-sea dwellers. "This is a scientific opportunity because we can get an endless amount of information from the samples we're collecting," said Eric Hochberg, curator of invertebrate zoology with the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | MICHAEL MILSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lifting a long-handled net out of the Madison River, David Richards studied the mesh, inspecting little black dots. "The first time I looked, I saw gravel," said Richards, an aquatic ecologist in Yellowstone National Park. "Then I said: 'That's not gravel. It's moving. It's snails.' " More specifically, a species of New Zealand snail that invaded the Snake River in Idaho in the mid-1980s and, more recently, prime fishing waters in Yellowstone National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1992 | JULES LOH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"I do not think of blindness as an advantage," the professor was saying the other day, in all seriousness. But neither was Geerat Vermeij, the blind professor, speculating on possible reasons why he was chosen recently for a $280,000 grant to use as he pleases, no strings attached. There is no reason to suspect the award was for anything other than solid scientific accomplishment. That and the safe bet that with financial distractions removed, further meritorious research would result.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For some Ventura County fishermen and seafood restaurateurs, fall is marked each year by a massive spontaneous migration of squid to local waters. Like clockwork, the squid arrive yearly in an instinctive spawning rush. And so the fishermen return with their nets to designated locations offshore, where a bountiful harvest awaits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | MARK NOLLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Still puzzled by a mysterious plague that has nearly wiped out one type of abalone in the Channel Islands, state and federal wildlife experts now fear that the ailment may be spreading to other varieties of the marine mollusk--a scenario that could jeopardize commercial abalone fishing in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
The federal government on Friday proposed declaring the black abalone an endangered species, the first step in an effort to bring back the once-abundant mollusk ravaged by disease and excessive harvesting. The final decision, expected to come after a year of further study, would not have an immediate impact on the hunting of black abalone in California, which has been illegal here since 1993.
FOOD
May 14, 1987 | MINNIE BERNARDINO, Times Staff Writer
Visualize the squid. The wrong-side out mollusk with its "plastic" shell inside its tubelike form. You can call it calamari, if that adds any class. Some think it's an ugly creature with "scary" tentacles, big bulging eyes and a mottled gold and purplish brown body. Without even being tasted, the poor little sea creature is condemned as slimy . . . yucky. And sometimes, even if it has been sampled, the squid still suffers the unjust reputation of being tough and chewy.
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