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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2005 | Claudia Zequeira, Times Staff Writer
More dead jumbo squid are washing up along Orange County's coastline, and although that's bad news for the creatures, it's good news for scientists eager to learn more about the mysterious deep-sea dwellers. "This is a scientific opportunity because we can get an endless amount of information from the samples we're collecting," said Eric Hochberg, curator of invertebrate zoology with the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.
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NEWS
October 3, 1996 | MICHAEL MILSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lifting a long-handled net out of the Madison River, David Richards studied the mesh, inspecting little black dots. "The first time I looked, I saw gravel," said Richards, an aquatic ecologist in Yellowstone National Park. "Then I said: 'That's not gravel. It's moving. It's snails.' " More specifically, a species of New Zealand snail that invaded the Snake River in Idaho in the mid-1980s and, more recently, prime fishing waters in Yellowstone National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1992 | JULES LOH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"I do not think of blindness as an advantage," the professor was saying the other day, in all seriousness. But neither was Geerat Vermeij, the blind professor, speculating on possible reasons why he was chosen recently for a $280,000 grant to use as he pleases, no strings attached. There is no reason to suspect the award was for anything other than solid scientific accomplishment. That and the safe bet that with financial distractions removed, further meritorious research would result.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For some Ventura County fishermen and seafood restaurateurs, fall is marked each year by a massive spontaneous migration of squid to local waters. Like clockwork, the squid arrive yearly in an instinctive spawning rush. And so the fishermen return with their nets to designated locations offshore, where a bountiful harvest awaits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | MARK NOLLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Still puzzled by a mysterious plague that has nearly wiped out one type of abalone in the Channel Islands, state and federal wildlife experts now fear that the ailment may be spreading to other varieties of the marine mollusk--a scenario that could jeopardize commercial abalone fishing in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
The federal government on Friday proposed declaring the black abalone an endangered species, the first step in an effort to bring back the once-abundant mollusk ravaged by disease and excessive harvesting. The final decision, expected to come after a year of further study, would not have an immediate impact on the hunting of black abalone in California, which has been illegal here since 1993.
FOOD
May 14, 1987 | MINNIE BERNARDINO, Times Staff Writer
Visualize the squid. The wrong-side out mollusk with its "plastic" shell inside its tubelike form. You can call it calamari, if that adds any class. Some think it's an ugly creature with "scary" tentacles, big bulging eyes and a mottled gold and purplish brown body. Without even being tasted, the poor little sea creature is condemned as slimy . . . yucky. And sometimes, even if it has been sampled, the squid still suffers the unjust reputation of being tough and chewy.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Nicole Santa Cruz and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Laurentino Cardenas leaned over the edge of his narrow boat, his hands clenched above the murky green surface of the Gulf of Mexico's Bayou Terrebonne. The name means "good earth" in French, and it has indeed been good to Louisiana. Oystermen like Cardenas have long scraped the gulf's floor, clinging to metal rakes as the oysters cling to reefs, with a determination that has allowed them to survive nature's wrath and man's mistakes. Until now. The BP oil spill is killing off a centuries-old way of life, and endangering one of the world's largest wild oyster systems.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck Bray was in the surf above his knees, digging with a pitchfork for one last pismo clam before the tide rose too high. Just a few yards away, his fiercest competitor, a four-legged fur ball, happily banged two clamshells together until one broke. The 50-pound sea otter, once threatened with extinction, gobbled up the clam and dived down for another. "At one point, the otter was just 15 feet from us," said the cold and soggy Bray, who drove all the way from Salinas to go clamming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1996 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an anguished metallic cry, a winch slowly pulls a shimmering black net teeming with squid aboard the Heavy Duty. Giant light bulbs visible for miles illuminate the evening's catch: 25 tons of silvery squid that in a matter of hours will be chopped into calamari bound for overseas markets. "The boat's leaning now!" yells a crew member, as the metal winch strains to hoist the heavy load alongside the 58-foot vessel.
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