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Molly Joel Coye

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NEWS
May 27, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gov. Pete Wilson named Dr. Molly Joel Coye to run the state Department of Health Services, the announcement mentioned a study of mercury poisoning in Nicaragua on a long list of her accomplishments. What the release by the Republican Administration left out was that the study took place a decade ago, on behalf of Nicaragua's Marxist Sandinista government.
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NEWS
January 14, 1993 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move toward overhauling the state's public health care delivery system, State Health Director Molly Joel Coye unveiled a plan Wednesday to impose a managed health care plan for the state's 5 million Medi-Cal recipients.
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NEWS
May 14, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson announced Monday that he has picked Dr. Molly Joel Coye, a 1960s political activist, to become director of the Department of Health Services, the state's chief public health office. Coye replaces another medical doctor, Kenneth W. Kizer, who will step down later this month to work in the private sector after more than six years in a job that often is the center of controversy.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Molly J. Coye, whose confirmation as director of health services got snagged in controversy over a proposed nuclear waste dump and the diversion of anti-smoking funds to other programs, was unanimously approved by the Senate on Thursday. The qualifications of Coye, a physician who speaks fluent Spanish and Mandarin and served as commissioner of public health of New Jersey, were applauded and never challenged during her drawn-out two-month confirmation.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move toward overhauling the state's public health care delivery system, State Health Director Molly Joel Coye unveiled a plan Wednesday to impose a managed health care plan for the state's 5 million Medi-Cal recipients.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Molly J. Coye, whose confirmation as director of health services got snagged in controversy over a proposed nuclear waste dump and the diversion of anti-smoking funds to other programs, was unanimously approved by the Senate on Thursday. The qualifications of Coye, a physician who speaks fluent Spanish and Mandarin and served as commissioner of public health of New Jersey, were applauded and never challenged during her drawn-out two-month confirmation.
OPINION
October 27, 1991 | Janny Scott, Janny Scott is a medical writer for The Times. She interviewed Molly Joel Coye during the director's recent visit to Los Angeles
It's an awkward time to be California's top public-health official: Six million Californians have no health insurance, health-care costs are well above the national average and the state has been facing an unprecedented budget crisis. Dr. Molly Joel Coye became director of the Department of Health Services in June. Now she must preside over $30.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
JOB FRONT: California Secretary of State March Fong Eu is shopping for an ambassadorship, destination unknown. . . . Dr. Mark Smith, vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation in San Francisco, is frequently mentioned as a possibility to fill the post of White House AIDS czar. He's highly regarded in the AIDS community. His wife, Dr. Molly Joel Coye, runs California's Department of Health Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991 | Times Wire Services
California issued a health warning Wednesday and ordered a Los Angeles company to stop selling or distributing dried rattlesnake products found to contain deadly salmonella bacteria. Laboratory tests of the dried rattlesnake powder and capsules produced by Herbs of Mexico detected heavy concentrations of the bacteria, which are common in reptiles, said state Health Director Molly Joel Coye. The bacteria apparently survived because the product was inadequately pasteurized, Coye said.
OPINION
October 27, 1991 | Janny Scott, Janny Scott is a medical writer for The Times. She interviewed Molly Joel Coye during the director's recent visit to Los Angeles
It's an awkward time to be California's top public-health official: Six million Californians have no health insurance, health-care costs are well above the national average and the state has been facing an unprecedented budget crisis. Dr. Molly Joel Coye became director of the Department of Health Services in June. Now she must preside over $30.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gov. Pete Wilson named Dr. Molly Joel Coye to run the state Department of Health Services, the announcement mentioned a study of mercury poisoning in Nicaragua on a long list of her accomplishments. What the release by the Republican Administration left out was that the study took place a decade ago, on behalf of Nicaragua's Marxist Sandinista government.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson announced Monday that he has picked Dr. Molly Joel Coye, a 1960s political activist, to become director of the Department of Health Services, the state's chief public health office. Coye replaces another medical doctor, Kenneth W. Kizer, who will step down later this month to work in the private sector after more than six years in a job that often is the center of controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1993
On behalf of California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, I would like to respond to the Aug. 28 letter from Molly Joel Coye, director of the Department of Health Services, regarding our 1992 report card on nursing homes. Our report did not link the number of deficiencies issued against facilities with inadequate enforcement. In fact, the report card specifically criticized three areas of enforcement: the collection of fines, failure to respond to complaints and inconsistency in enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1993
I commend The Times for supporting Gov. Pete Wilson's ban on smoking in all state-owned and state-leased buildings ("Another Victory Against Stink," editorial, Feb. 24). Smoke-free workplaces can improve the health of workers, raise their productivity and reduce costs related to fire risks, cleaning accidents and damage to furnishings. A smoke-free workplace also protects the health of nonsmokers, and protects the pocketbooks of California taxpayers who ultimately pay the bill for the disease and death caused by smoking.
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