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NEWS
April 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Molly Picon, a comic star of the Yiddish theater who also tickled audiences in vaudeville, radio and on Broadway, has died. She was 93. Miss Picon, a zestful performer who also wrote much of her own material, died Sunday at her sister's home in Lancaster, Pa., theatrical agent Max Eisen said Monday. He said she was suffering from Alzheimer's disease.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The film that put Yiddish cinema on the map nearly 60 years ago is getting a rare public showing next Sunday at Cinespace in Hollywood. Avada, a project of Yiddishkayt Los Angeles, an organization that promotes Yiddish language and culture, is presenting the 1936 Yiddish classic "Yidl Mitn Fidl." Between 1929 and 1950, 40 to 50 Yiddish films were produced in America and shown primarily in New York and other major cities along the Eastern seaboard with large Jewish populations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Molly Picon may not be well-known outside the Jewish community, but within it, especially among older folks, she's an entertainment icon. Known as "the female Charlie Chaplin" during a stage career that lasted more than eight decades, Picon was a mainstay on the New York vaudeville circuit and became the queen of Yiddish theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Molly Picon may not be well-known outside the Jewish community, but within it, especially among older folks, she's an entertainment icon. Known as "the female Charlie Chaplin" during a stage career that lasted more than eight decades, Picon was a mainstay on the New York vaudeville circuit and became the queen of Yiddish theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The film that put Yiddish cinema on the map nearly 60 years ago is getting a rare public showing next Sunday at Cinespace in Hollywood. Avada, a project of Yiddishkayt Los Angeles, an organization that promotes Yiddish language and culture, is presenting the 1936 Yiddish classic "Yidl Mitn Fidl." Between 1929 and 1950, 40 to 50 Yiddish films were produced in America and shown primarily in New York and other major cities along the Eastern seaboard with large Jewish populations.
NEWS
February 15, 1989
Dave Tarras, 91, one of the most widely recorded musicians in Yiddish theater and a leading clarinet player in the expressive klezmer style of Jewish folk music. Tarras, who left his native Ternovka in the southern Ukraine and emigrated to New York in 1921, appeared on more than 500 recordings as a soloist, bandleader and sideman.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Two kinds of cinematic traditions can be celebrated in the coming weeks, starting with the annual Christmas Eve "Fiddler on the Roof" sing-along dreamed up by the Laemmle chain and now expanding to no less than six theaters. The Broadway musical, based on the classic Tevye stories by preeminent Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem, was made into an Oscar-winning film (for Oswald Morris' cinematography and John Williams' score) in 1971 that boasts Isaac Stern playing violin on the soundtrack.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If "A Taste of Life: Oh Mama" could be approached on some kind of camp level, then writer-director Carlotta Adams' impossibly crude, moralistic melodrama at Theatre of Arts might be a revelatory cartoon of a good girl gone bad. But things are too earnest here for that: This is a lesson-play on what terrible things happen to rich, spoiled teen-ager Reecie (Gloria Henri, strong on the emotions) when she doesn't obey her mother (Contrella Patrick-Henry).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's hard to imagine a more profound expression of the healing power of music than Matthew Asner and Danny Gold's deeply affecting "100 Voices: A Journey Home. " The film follows cantor Nate Lam, of L.A.'s Stephen S. Wise Temple and father of the film's co-writer and co-producer, as the 72 cantors he gathered from around the world perform at the Warsaw Opera House, the largest theater of its kind in Europe. They also appeared at the Krakow Philharmonic, participated in Poland's annual Jewish Cultural Heritage Festival and conducted the first Jewish service at Auschwitz-Birkenau.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1987 | KENNETH HERMAN
Never afraid of overexposure, pianist Gustavo Romero has booked two solo recitals next month at downtown San Diego churches. His Jan. 8 recital at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral was announced last week, much to the consternation of the concert committee of the First Presbyterian Church. Along with violinist Frank Almond Jr., the rising young pianist from Chula Vista performed to an SRO audience at First Presbyterian in January, 1987.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Molly Picon, a comic star of the Yiddish theater who also tickled audiences in vaudeville, radio and on Broadway, has died. She was 93. Miss Picon, a zestful performer who also wrote much of her own material, died Sunday at her sister's home in Lancaster, Pa., theatrical agent Max Eisen said Monday. He said she was suffering from Alzheimer's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Ariella Budick, Newsday
Between 1881 and 1914, 2 million Yiddish-speaking Jews decamped from their European homelands and replanted themselves in America. Most settled in the concrete and brick wilderness of New York City, where, in 1914, Jews of Eastern European descent made up one-quarter of the population. Most of these immigrants read the Jewish Daily Forward, a newspaper they regarded with the reverence they otherwise reserved for Scripture.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Sometimes an audience hums the tunes on its way out of the theater. At "On Second Avenue," the audience hums--and sings--while the show is still going on. At least that's what happened in this nostalgic Yiddish-English revue at the Wilshire Ebell on Saturday night. Responding to an invitation in the program--"sing with us"--the crowd joined in to warble such ditties as "Rozhinkes mit Mandlen" ("Raisins and Almonds"). In Yiddish, of course.
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