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Mona Lisa

NEWS
November 8, 1992 | TED ANTHONY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The comparison is shocking, perhaps, but a small but determined group of conservationists finds it apt. It's like AIDS, they say: Appalachia's most visible treasure, its forests, is fighting once-harmless diseases that may suddenly have turned lethal. "Trees are dying," said Orie Loucks, a professor and ecosystems expert at Miami University of Ohio. "They simply cannot resist disease anymore. The comparison to AIDS is certainly there."
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NEWS
September 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
RESEARCHERS using three-dimensional technology to study the Mona Lisa say the woman depicted in Leonardo da Vinci's 16th century masterpiece was either pregnant or had recently given birth when she sat for the painting. That was one of many discoveries found by French and Canadian researchers during one of the most extensive physical examinations ever carried out on the artwork. "Thanks to laser scanning, we were able to uncover the very fine gauze veil Mona Lisa was wearing on her dress.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Summertime, and the pickings are dreadful. In a season not noted for adult diversions, "Mona Lisa" could hardly be more welcome: a glorious, heart-shaped box of bittersweet chocolates for the grown-ups in the house. Rueful and funny; brutal, beautiful and lushly romantic, "Mona Lisa" (at the Cineplex Odeon Showplace and Plitt Century Plaza) finds gallantry and real heroism among the most unlikely surroundings: the sex shops and drug traffic of London's seamy underside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1986 | GORDON GRANT, Times Staff Writer
For the live-bait boat Mona Lisa, the day didn't start too well. It had put out from Dana Point in the 2:30 chill of the morning, and three hours later it was offshore of Oceanside, about 20 miles down the coast. After an hour of circling, its sonar and fish-finding electronic gear found a school of anchovies. It streamed its huge net in the early dawn waters just as the lights ashore began winking off, leaving the sky and seas a depressing gray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1986 | GORDON GRANT, Times Staff Writer
For the live-bait boat Mona Lisa, the day didn't start too well. She had put out from Dana Point in the 2:30 chill of the morning, and three hours later was offshore of Oceanside, about 20 miles down the coast. After an hour of circling, her sonar and fish-finding electronic gear located a school of anchovies, and she streamed her huge net in the early dawn waters just as the lights ashore began winking off, leaving the sky and seas a depressing gray.
TRAVEL
May 16, 1999 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The kids elbowed their way to the front of the crowd, determined to get the best look they could at the most famous lady in the world. They weren't disappointed. "She looked straight at me, I'm sure!" 7-year-old Melanie said. Even the two typically blase 12-year-olds with us were convinced Mona Lisa's famous smile changed when she saw them. "Impossible," I said, laughing. "People in paintings don't move, not even the 'Mona Lisa.'
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | Associated Press
"Mona Lisa" has fascinated art historians and inspired love songs for centuries, but her ineffable gaze is not that of a mysterious woman, a researcher says. It's that of artist Leonardo da Vinci. A computer researcher at American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s Bell Laboratories juxtaposed a red chalk self-portrait of da Vinci with "Mona Lisa" and found that the eyes, hairline, cheeks and nose were identical, according to the January issue of Art & Antiques magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | David Rising, Associated Press
BERLIN -- A researcher has uncovered evidence that apparently confirms the identity of the woman behind the "Mona Lisa's" iconic smile, Germany's University of Heidelberg says. She is Lisa del Giocondo, wife of Florentine businessman Francesco del Giocondo, according to notes written in the margins of a book by a friend of Leonardo da Vinci as the artist worked on the masterpiece, the school said in a statement this week.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who reviews restaurants weekly for The Times Orange County Edition.
Finding a good ethnic restaurant makes a food writer's day. A great one can brighten up an entire season. Da Vinci, a new addition to Santa Ana's unassuming motel, the Bluebird Inn, is a wonderful small restaurant with an amalgam of northern Italian cooking, that of the provinces Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria. The property, including the motel, belongs to a courtly couple named Layla and Mike Boyajian. Da Vinci represents the Boyajians' third try at a successful restaurant on the premises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brian and Lorrie Seigel were still jumping for joy over snaring the ultimate baseball card in an Internet auction when their 13-year-old tapped her mother on the shoulder. "If Dad can spend $1 million on a baseball card, why can't I have a horse?" Jessica moaned. This episode of Lifestyles of the Rich and Newly Famous, starring the Seigels of Santa Ana, came after he became the proud new owner Tuesday of what he called "the Mona Lisa of baseball cards." Seigel paid nearly $1.
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