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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
Brother Nicholas Radelmiller tolled the bell amid the ruins of the Mt. Calvary Monastery, but no worshipers were there to hear it. Down the mountainside, workers revved up their chain saws as homeowners burned out by November's devastating Santa Barbara wildfires prepared to rebuild. But at the monastery on a promontory 1,250 feet above the sea, acres of rubble awaited the bulldozers that are to arrive this week. The fire that swept through on the night of Nov.
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NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Alexander the Great slept here -- and lived here too. The place is Macedonia, which was part of Greece in ancient times. Most recently, it has been working to raise its tourism profile after its break from the former Yugoslavia more than two decades ago. Tour company Macedonia Experience, based in the city of Skopje, is part of the effort to put the nation on the European tourism map. It offers many active and leisure trips around the country,...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Some residents apparently are not satisfied by reassurances from members of the Myanmar Buddhist Society that a meditation center and monastery proposed for their community would be a place of quiet. A community group says it will appeal a Planning Commission decision giving the group permission to build the 5-acre retreat. "It is all those cars coming and going that concern me," said Georgia Campbell, who lives on the hilltop above the site.
WORLD
August 20, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
HELWAN, Egypt - The gunmen sped past on motorcycles and in a car, firing automatic weapons and hurling gasoline bombs. Parishioners ran for cover as bullets chipped the stone and rattled the metal doors of St. George's Church. Adel Samir hasn't slept since Friday's attack. A mechanic, he now guards the church south of Cairo. The street out front has been barricaded. Other men, tattooed with the cross, wield clubs and patrol the perimeter amid yellow dust rising from cement factories along the Nile.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | From Reuters
The main part of Thyangboche Monastery, a landmark for foreigners hiking to Mt. Everest, has burned to the ground, a Buddhist priest said Saturday. The priest, who flew by helicopter to the site high in the Himalayas, told reporters the ruins of the main prayer hall were still smoldering. The fire, apparently caused by an electrical fault, broke out late Thursday. Hikers camping at the monastery helped save some of the religious books and paintings.
WORLD
July 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia is bringing home from the United States 18 sacred Moscow monastery bells that had been sold as scrap by the Soviet Union. Charles Crane, a U.S. industrialist and diplomat, bought the Danilovsky Monastery's bells from Josef Stalin's atheist government in 1930 and gave them to Harvard University. Many similar bells from churches were melted down in Stalin's industrialization drive. President Vladimir V.
TRAVEL
May 14, 1989 | PETER AIKEN, Aiken is a free-lance writer living in Nantucket, Mass. and
Monasteries, regardless of religion, appeal to that side of my personality that is contemplative, bookish and escapist. I arrange for a room, choose worthy paperback roommates, load a camera and journey toward the silence. I remember past monasteries: a rainy night's climb to the Buddhist monastery on Adam's Peak on Sri Lanka; the dusty ride to St. Catherine's in the Sinai, the shattering of thin ice to wash my morning face at the Japanese monastery on Mt. Koya, Honshu Island. The years passed and I found myself in Thessaloniki, shortened to Salonika, applying for permission from the Ministry of Northern Greece to go to Mt. Athos on the Chalcidice Peninsula below the plains of Macedonia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 200 people jammed Tuesday night's City Council meeting to express their views on a proposal for a Buddhist monastery and meditation center on the east side of town. Those against construction of the religious complex, proposed by the Myanmar Buddhist Society of America, told council members they feared it would bring traffic jams and noise. Those who spoke in support of it included representatives of a number of other religious organizations.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
As bells pealed and monks sang, President Reagan paid an unlikely visit Monday, turning a 700-year-old Russian Orthodox monastery into the very symbol of his personal campaign to pressure the Soviet Union into allowing greater freedom of religion. Reagan brought an entourage of some of the most senior officials of the U.S. government, along with television cameras and reporters, to the Danilov Monastery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | Associated Press
A Tibetan monastery has been threatened with closure after the arrests of four of its monks for shouting slogans against Chinese rule, a monitoring group says. Buddhist monks were confined to Taglung Drag monastery near Lhasa for a month after the arrests last year, the Tibet Information Network said in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The extraordinary abortion-themed drama "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days" placed Cristian Mungiu in the forefront of international cinema, and the Romanian director's new film, "Beyond the Hills," likewise concerns the bond between two young women. Again they face ineffectual institutions, but there's another, more urgent push-pull at the heart of this haunting, beautifully acted feature. After several years apart, lifelong friends Alina (Cristina Flutur) and Voichita (Cosmina Stratan)
WORLD
July 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
TERYAYEVO, Russia - As she tried to remove the priceless Bible from its glass case, Moscow University professor Irina Pozdeyeva could barely lift the almost 2,000-page book. The gray-haired scholar ran her fingers through the meticulously stitched and restored leaves of the Bible, produced in 1581 by Ivan Fyodorov, father of Russian printing. Pozdeyeva said she never fails to experience a surge of emotion when she handles the book, one of 350 surviving copies of the first Bibles printed in Russia in the old Slavonic language.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2012 | By Margo Pfeiff, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Birds twitter and sunshine twinkles through groves of bamboo and banyan trees adorned with cascades of orchids. With every step, my Vibram boot soles crush hibiscus blossoms littering a pathway, while butterflies flutter around a group of elderly folks welcoming the morning with the gracious silent semaphore of tai chi. At a clearing where remnants of a World War ll gun emplacement rust, half-swallowed in greenery, an opening in the jungle reveals...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Born more than 2,000 years ago, the Roman poet Lucretius really belongs to our day. How's that? Well, when you look closely at his great work, "On the Nature of Things" (W.W. Norton: 177 pp., $15.95 paper), you find him writing about a world that sounds much like our own. There he speaks of tiny, indivisible bits called atoms ("all/are sundered into particles of matter") and something that even sounds like a description of DNA ("each thing has but one substance/marked and designed to bring it into being")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Occasionally they would knock on a neighbor's door to borrow tools or ask for help with a maintenance issue. But for the most part, the Buddhist nuns on Marcon Drive in Walnut kept to the ranch-style house where they lived and worshiped. For 10 years, the young women with the shaved heads and long robes were accepted as part of an eclectic neighborhood of single-family homes, a middle school, a spacious public park and four churches — one Mormon, one Lutheran and two catering to Korean American Christians.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The ruins poke out of a monotonous stretch of scrub and beckon the world to visit Afghanistan as it was more than 1,400 years ago, when Buddhist monasteries dotted the landscape. An ancient citadel juts from a tall crag, standing sentinel over what once was a flourishing settlement. The monastery sits largely preserved, as does a series of reliquaries adorned with schist arches and shelves. But few people today will have a chance to see these ruins, which French and Afghan archaeologists are unearthing.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Government troops raided one of several monasteries they are surrounding in the central city of Mandalay and detained some of those inside, state radio reported in Myanmar, formerly Burma. Monks, who have been at the forefront of anti-government protests, had been refusing to minister to soldiers. Earlier reports said the monks had given up their boycott after troops ringed at least six monasteries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1988 | RIP RENSE
It's an intriguing picture: The 21 Buddhist monks who make up the Dalai Lama's personal choir riding in a van to between concerts of chants, swaying gently to the music of Otis Redding and the Supremes. "I was playing Otis," said Mickey Hart, drummer/percussionist for the Grateful Dead and self-styled ethnomusicologist. "And they liked it. I mean, they're not screaming out the window when they hear Otis; they smile and they move back and forth. They're very light, fun-loving people."
TRAVEL
April 17, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel Editor
Question: My son and I are going to London in June, and we were wondering whether you have any great ideas for budget accommodations. We were told that convents are great deals, but there is a curfew and that's not going to work for my 27-year-old son. We could do a room in a house, an apartment for a week, a bed-and-breakfast or a little hotel. --Patti Black, Pacific Palisades Answer: "Budget" and "London" these days are almost mutually exclusive. One good yardstick, the U.S. government's per diem — the allowance for federal employees traveling abroad — shows a max of $321 a day for a room and $182 for meals and incidentals.
NEWS
March 6, 2011
The ruins of Petra in Jordan are among the world's most renowned archaeological sites. The ancient city is known for towering structures half-built and half-carved into the rock. On a trip to the ruins in December, Times reader Sara Shuman shot this photo of the monastery, one of Petra's most famous structures, with her iPhone. "We rode donkeys up the 800 steps in Petra...to see this amazing Nabataean monument," Shuman says. "Most folks don't take the time and effort to climb up the mountain to see this amazing template.
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