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Money Laundering Mexico

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four Mexican nationals have quietly entered guilty pleas and agreed to testify against fellow defendants indicted in Operation Casablanca, the biggest drug money laundering sting in U.S. history. They are the first defectors from the ranks of about 40 Mexican and Venezuelan bankers, businessmen and suspected drug cartel members arrested in May after a two-year cross-border investigation by undercover agents from the U.S. Customs Service. Seventy others indicted are fugitives.
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WORLD
August 26, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
As part of his administration's fight against organized crime, Mexican President Felipe Calderon proposed new steps Thursday to curb money laundering. Calderon said he will give Congress a package of legislation that would limit big-ticket cash purchases through which drug traffickers launder billions of dollars smuggled south across the U.S.- Mexico border. It would also stiffen reporting requirements for businesses and strengthen the government's hand in detecting transactions aimed at helping drug lords launder proceeds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key defendant in Operation Casablanca, the massive drug money laundering case against Mexican banks and bankers, pleaded guilty Monday in Los Angeles federal court. Victor Manuel Alcala Navarro, a reputed money launderer for the Juarez drug cartel, entered his plea to 28 criminal counts three weeks before he was to go on trial on money laundering and conspiracy charges. Alcala, known as El Doctor, fell prey to a sting operation by undercover U.S.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
Western Union will pay $94 million to settle a long-running legal battle with the state of Arizona over whether the company allowed its money transfers to be used to send proceeds from human trafficking and drug smuggling to Mexico, officials announced Thursday. The settlement includes $50 million that will help law enforcement operations in border states fight money laundering. Western Union has also agreed to beef up its internal procedures to stop its wire transfers from being exploited.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | Associated Press
A man who pleaded guilty in a New York court to smuggling deaf Mexicans into the United States and forcing them to work as trinket vendors has been deported to Mexico to face money-laundering charges, police reported Thursday. Alfredo Rustrian Paoletti, know by the deaf workers as "the Hearing Man" because he is not deaf, was placed under arrest at the Mexico City airport.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Juarez cartel laundered about $47 million in drug money through a financial group, a newspaper reported. Reforma quoted a government prosecutor as saying the cartel, which bought a controlling share of Grupo Financiero Anahuac before authorities took it over, managed to launder millions of pesos. "Using Anahuac, the organization laundered money through bank branches in the Cayman Islands . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid speculation about last-minute plea agreements, three of Mexico's most prominent banks are set to go on trial Thursday in Los Angeles federal court on charges of laundering millions of dollars for the Cali and Juarez drug cartels. The trial, which could have far-reaching political and economic repercussions in Mexico, is the first of four stemming from Operation Casablanca, the U.S. Customs Service's massive probe of international drug-money laundering.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trucks and cars stuffed with dollars are crossing the southwest border into Mexico every day in money laundering schemes that have helped make Southern California the main collection center for drug money in the United States, Congress was told by a series of witnesses Thursday. The witnesses, who included Clinton administration officials, California Deputy Atty. Gen. James D. Dutton and private investigators, could not put a definite figure on the amount of dollars laundered in Mexico. But Rep.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two weeks of tirades against American officials for failing to inform Mexico of a money-laundering "sting" operation, authorities here have acknowledged that U.S. agents did tell them of the investigation two years ago--and even asked for support. But the attorney general's office declared that the meeting with U.S. agents in January 1996 did not amount to approval for the Americans to stage undercover operations in Mexico.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican officials muzzled their resentment Wednesday over a controversial U.S. money-laundering sting as the cabinets of both nations opened their annual conference and publicly stressed the depth of their cooperation and friendship. Citing Operation Casablanca--in which U.S. agents operated on Mexican soil and incriminated 26 Mexican bankers--Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said that, in another era, fallout from that sting "might have escalated and impeded progress on many fronts."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Mexico City stockbroker who says she feared she might be killed if she refused to join an international drug money-laundering network came under intense cross-examination Thursday from a federal prosecutor who portrayed her as a willing and eager conspirator. Katy Kissel Belfer, 28, was pressed to explain why she joked and laughed and gave warm hugs to two purported members of the Cali drug cartel whom she said she feared. Kissel said she was simply "over-acting."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid speculation about last-minute plea agreements, three of Mexico's most prominent banks are set to go on trial Thursday in Los Angeles federal court on charges of laundering millions of dollars for the Cali and Juarez drug cartels. The trial, which could have far-reaching political and economic repercussions in Mexico, is the first of four stemming from Operation Casablanca, the U.S. Customs Service's massive probe of international drug-money laundering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key defendant in Operation Casablanca, the massive drug money laundering case against Mexican banks and bankers, pleaded guilty Monday in Los Angeles federal court. Victor Manuel Alcala Navarro, a reputed money launderer for the Juarez drug cartel, entered his plea to 28 criminal counts three weeks before he was to go on trial on money laundering and conspiracy charges. Alcala, known as El Doctor, fell prey to a sting operation by undercover U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Wednesday rejected a raft of defense complaints that government investigators engaged in outrageous misconduct during Operation Casablanca, the Customs Service's probe of international drug money laundering. U.S. District Judge Lourdes G. Baird's action clears the way for the start of the first of four trials in the mammoth case that resulted in the indictment last year of more than 100 people and three prominent Mexican banks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's key undercover witness in Operation Casablanca received more than $2 million for helping authorities mount the biggest drug money laundering investigation in history, it was disclosed Friday. Most of the money--$1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four Mexican nationals have quietly entered guilty pleas and agreed to testify against fellow defendants indicted in Operation Casablanca, the biggest drug money laundering sting in U.S. history. They are the first defectors from the ranks of about 40 Mexican and Venezuelan bankers, businessmen and suspected drug cartel members arrested in May after a two-year cross-border investigation by undercover agents from the U.S. Customs Service. Seventy others indicted are fugitives.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright admonished Mexico on Thursday to refrain from carrying out its threat to indict U.S. undercover agents who delved into Mexican territory to catch Mexican bankers in the Operation Casablanca money-laundering sting. Despite her public defense of the U.S. agents, new evidence suggests that, behind the scenes, Albright has been highly critical of the Treasury Department handling of this matter. In a scathing letter to Treasury Secretary Robert E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Mexico City stockbroker who says she feared she might be killed if she refused to join an international drug money-laundering network came under intense cross-examination Thursday from a federal prosecutor who portrayed her as a willing and eager conspirator. Katy Kissel Belfer, 28, was pressed to explain why she joked and laughed and gave warm hugs to two purported members of the Cali drug cartel whom she said she feared. Kissel said she was simply "over-acting."
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | Associated Press
A man who pleaded guilty in a New York court to smuggling deaf Mexicans into the United States and forcing them to work as trinket vendors has been deported to Mexico to face money-laundering charges, police reported Thursday. Alfredo Rustrian Paoletti, know by the deaf workers as "the Hearing Man" because he is not deaf, was placed under arrest at the Mexico City airport.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright admonished Mexico on Thursday to refrain from carrying out its threat to indict U.S. undercover agents who delved into Mexican territory to catch Mexican bankers in the Operation Casablanca money-laundering sting. Despite her public defense of the U.S. agents, new evidence suggests that, behind the scenes, Albright has been highly critical of the Treasury Department handling of this matter. In a scathing letter to Treasury Secretary Robert E.
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