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Money Supply

NEWS
September 25, 2001 | LISA GETTER and JOSH MEYER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Aiming deep at the financial heart of Osama bin Laden's terrorism network, President Bush on Monday ordered the Treasury Department to freeze the U.S. assets of any bank in the world that does business with organizations believed responsible for the deadly attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
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NEWS
February 27, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government has spent more than $110 billion on energy research in the last half-century. Tax breaks and other subsidies to encourage development of various sources of energy--for everything from oil wells to nuclear plants to wind turbines--easily double that figure.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1999 | JOHN FLANIGAN
Alan Greenspan revealed last week, in an almost unnoticed comment in his testimony to Congress, that he is indeed King of the World. The chairman of the Federal Reserve explained to the House Ways and Means committee that last fall, because of fears in world financial markets over Russia, Brazil and Asia, the Fed had acted to expand the supply of money circulating in the U.S. and world economies. Greenspan and the Fed governors saw the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those who fear that Germany's role as the biggest lender to foundering Russia has put the economic powerhouse of Europe at risk of its own tumble have only to look at its strengthening currency and unshaken growth outlook for reassurance.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | TOM PETRUNO
A long, long time ago--as in before the 1990s bull market--economists and many investors had an obsession with the nation's money supply statistics. Wall Street waited with great trepidation for the data each week, then reacted maniacally. Well, look who's back. The money supply has again become a hot issue among many economists, thanks to what some contend has been explosive growth recently in key measures of that economic barometer.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1997 | SCOTT BURNS, Scott Burns writes for the Dallas Morning News
"The City Different" is just that. Where else do residents covet dirt roads and protest that paving will reduce real estate values? Where else does it seem entirely reasonable? Time to read. Time to actually read something without rushing, something more than a few pages long, and maybe, just maybe, something that will make what's happening around us appear to make sense. If you're going to have such an opportunity this summer, as I just did, let me make some recommendations.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside criticism by presumptive Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole, the Clinton administration announced Thursday that it will provide North Korea with $6.2 million in emergency food aid to help the Communist regime avert a famine. The administration's action marks the second time this year that it has given food aid to North Korea. U.S. officials said they are studying the possibility of also easing economic sanctions. "We're convinced that the food situation [in North Korea] .
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside criticism by presumptive Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole, the Clinton administration announced Wednesday that it will provide North Korea with $6.2 million in emergency food aid to help the Communist regime avert a famine. The administration's action marks the second time this year that it has given food aid to North Korea. U.S. officials said they are studying the possibility of also easing economic sanctions. "We're convinced that the food situation [in North Korea] .
NEWS
June 8, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reelection campaign that reaches for every trick and promise in the book, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has managed to steal much of his Communist rival's thunder. Under fire for inequities in his privatization program, Yeltsin suspended it. Condemned as the destroyer of the Soviet Union, he patched together a Slavic union with neighboring Belarus. He even hoisted the Communist flag in Red Square--minus the hammer and sickle.
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