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Mongolia

WORLD
October 23, 2005 | Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writer
King Richard III of England once offered up his kingdom for a horse. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, whose department contributes $18 million a year to Mongolia, received a horse Saturday simply for showing up in this far-flung capital. During Rumsfeld's brief stop in Ulan Bator, Mongolian Defense Minister Tserenkhuu Sharavdorj presented him with a caramel-colored Mongolian horse, a gift that powerful visitors have received in this wind-swept country for hundreds of years.
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WORLD
October 23, 2004 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
School principal Baast chose the name "Nomad" in keeping with his wandering spirit. Defense Minister Gurragchaa -- the only Mongolian to venture into space -- settled on "Cosmos." And anthropology student Vanchigdash picked the Mongolian word for wisdom. "It makes me feel rather wise," he said. "I'm very proud of my new name." Mongolians, long used to using only first names, are reshaping their identities under a government-led initiative to add surnames.
NEWS
May 1, 1990
In the first such visit in decades, the leader of Mongolia will be coming to China this week. The visit by President Punsalmaagiin Ochirbat, beginning Friday, formally ends three decades of estrangement between Ulan Bator and Beijing. The two governments were on friendly terms in the 1950s but split in the early 1960s when relations between Beijing and Moscow deteriorated.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | United Press International
The Senate on Friday confirmed the nominations of U.S. ambassadors to seven nations, including Joseph Edward Lake, a career Foreign Service officer, as the envoy to Mongolia. Lake was confirmed by voice vote and without debate, along with the six other ambassadors. Also confirmed were David Passage, Botswana; Richard Wayne Bogosian, Chad; William Milam, Bangladesh; James Daniel Phillips, Congo; Roger Gran Harrison, Jordan, and William Bode, Marshall Islands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Richard C. Blum, husband of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, has been appointed honorary consul general of the new Mongolian Honorary Consulate General here. Blum said his nomination came as a result of his interest in the Himalayan region. Blum is founder of the American Himalayan Foundation and also serves as honorary consul to the Kingdom of Nepal. The main goal of the position is to promote bilateral relations between Mongolia and the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2005 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Every Sunday evening after their 90-minute worship service, members of the L.A. Mongolian Church rearrange pew benches, turning their small sanctuary into a cozy dining room. There, they linger over noodles and tacos, and visit with each other late into the night. It's a weekly ritual that congregants of Los Angeles' only Mongolian church look forward to. It sustains them through the week, as they work long hours, often in low-paying jobs, to survive in America.
WORLD
November 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Braving snow and crowds, thousands of Mongolian Buddhists gathered to hear the Dalai Lama preach despite China's criticism of the visit. The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader spoke for more than two hours at a convention center in the capital, Ulan Bator, that was filled to its capacity of 5,000. Hundreds stood outside to listen over loudspeakers. The Dalai Lama arrived Monday on his first visit in nearly seven years to Mongolia, which shares religious and cultural ties with Tibet.
WORLD
January 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Mongolia's parliament dissolved its government after the biggest political party pulled out of the 15-month-old ruling coalition, prompting two days of protests amid complaints about poverty and corruption. After the vote to dissolve the government of Prime Minister Tsakhiagiin Elbedorj, the premier was appointed to lead an interim administration.
WORLD
August 20, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of people have been battling massive forest fires sweeping across Mongolia and shrouding the capital, Ulan Bator, in thick smoke, officials said. About 110 fires were raging in eight provinces, and 64 were out of control, civil defense officials said. The blazes are thought to have been started by vacationers visiting the countryside parched by a hot, dry summer. "The situation is catastrophic," civil defense spokesman Luvsanjamba said.
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