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Monica S Lewinsky

NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Reuters
Here is the text of a statement by independent counsel Robert W. Ray explaining his decision announced Friday to drop his investigation of President Clinton over the Monica S. Lewinsky affair: Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. Fifteen months ago, I promised the American people that I would complete this investigation promptly and responsibly. Today, I fulfill that promise. President Clinton has acknowledged responsibility for his actions.
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NEWS
August 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
President Clinton is still trying to make peace with his wife and daughter after his admission this week of an affair with Monica S. Lewinsky, a White House spokesman said Saturday. "I think he's working on it. My guess is that they've still got work to do," White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry said. "There's a healing process that needs to occur, and as far as I can tell, it's underway but it's not done yet," McCurry added.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
O.J. Simpson, who was once Brentwood's most notorious resident, made a brief stop in front of the home of the upscale community's newest media celebrity: Monica S. Lewinsky. Simpson drove his black sport utility vehicle to the front of the home of Lewinsky's father, Dr. Bernard Lewinsky. He spotted the numerous television camera operators gathered on the corner. Then they spotted him. He smiled for the cameras. "Is that the Lewinsky house?" he asked one cameraman.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | Associated Press
The Justice and Treasury departments argued Tuesday that Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr can be barred from questioning Secret Service officers about President Clinton's relationship with former intern Monica S. Lewinsky without Clinton himself making a claim of privilege, officials said. That argument came in a sealed court brief filed in opposition to Starr's sealed April 3 request that U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | Reuters
President Clinton's personal secretary, Betty Currie, was expected to be summoned before a grand jury investigating the White House sex scandal for a second time today, sources close to the probe said Monday. Currie was the first witness called in January when the panel supervised by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr began hearing evidence on whether Clinton had an affair with former White House intern Monica S.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | Washington Post
The federal judge who presided over the Paula Corbin Jones sexual harassment lawsuit Tuesday raised the prospect that she might hold President Clinton in contempt of court because of apparently misleading answers he gave about his relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky during a deposition in the Jones case. U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright, in a ruling released in Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
State prosecutors are asking a judge to clarify her ruling limiting evidence that can be used in Maryland's wiretapping case against Linda Tripp, hoping to salvage some of Monica S. Lewinsky's testimony. Judge Diane O. Leasure ruled May 5 that Lewinsky's testimony to a Maryland grand jury was tainted by Tripp's immunized testimony to federal authorities. She also questioned Lewinsky's credibility, saying the former White House intern had lied under oath and might have "shaped" her testimony.
NEWS
August 12, 1998 | From The Washington Post
When the allegations involving her husband and former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky arose seven months ago, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton attributed the investigation to a "vast right-wing conspiracy." Now, she is blaming her husband's legal difficulties on anti-Arkansas bias as well. "I think a lot of this is prejudice against our state," the first lady said in a telephone interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette published Tuesday.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Former independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr spent more than $52 million investigating President Clinton, officially making his Whitewater and Monica S. Lewinsky probes the most costly independent counsel investigation ever, according to a General Accounting Office report released Friday. The new GAO numbers, which cover the six-month period from March 31 to Sept. 30, 1999, surpass the spending record of $47.4 million set by Lawrence E. Walsh in the 1980s Iran-Contra inquiry. Robert W.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 67 million viewers tuned into President Clinton's Monday evening speech in which he admitted involvement with former intern Monica S. Lewinsky, according to Nielsen Media Research. The speech was carried on the four major networks and various cable outlets. In contrast, Clinton's State of the Union address in January drew 53 million viewers, the highest viewership for that event since 1993. Interest in that speech was heightened by allegations of Clinton's involvement with Lewinsky.
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