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Monogamy

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011
'Monogamy' No MPAA rating Running time: 1 hour, 36 minutes Playing: At Laemmle's Sunset 5, West Hollywood; Laemmle's Playhouse 7, Pasadena
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NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Happy Valentine's Day! It's the perfect day to look at monogamy in the animal kingdom. But if your first thoughts are warm and cuddly, you can wipe away those Disney delusions. When it comes to monogamy among animals, there are few ladies and many tramps. Certain species have been held up historically as models of monogamy -- swans, gibbons, the wolf pack's alpha male and female. But scientific research over time has chipped away at those paragons of virtue. Animals cheat.  MORE: Here's what happens to a brain in love Birds, in particular, were thought to be sexually steadfast with their mates.
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OPINION
June 1, 2012
Re "Untangling the evolutionary roots of monogamy," May 29 Humans are not monogamous. Among others, Islamic and traditional Mormon societies practice polygamy. Osama bin Laden had several wives, and Mitt Romney's ancestors moved to Mexico to practice polygamy after the U.S. government forced Utah to stop it. Bob Marley had 11 children by several different women; I've had three wives and several girlfriends. Although many societies impose monogamy, it has not evolved.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Come for the romance, stay for the oxytocin. That's the neurobiological bottom line on monogamy, according to a new study. Men spritzed with oxytocin, a hormone from the pituitary gland, showed a renewed attraction for the faces of their romantic partners, but not for equally attractive strangers, according to a study published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . And the men weren't just saying so....
OPINION
December 7, 2009 | By Sharon M. Scott
In his Nov. 22 Times Op-Ed article, "Monogamy isn't easy, naturally," biologist David P. Barash claims that because monogamy is rare in the animal world, it is therefore unnatural behavior for humans. The logic of the argument is critically flawed. In stating that dedication to a single individual is "against" human nature and that no one is "cut out for monogamy," Barash fails to recognize that the human is unlike any other creature on the planet. Comparing our behavior patterns to birds or animals may, at times, prove helpful in understanding our species, but it should not be used to determine what is and what is not "natural" for humans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you ever thought the peekaboo ominousness of "Blow-Up" or "The Conversation" could be the template for a relationship fidelity drama, "Monogamy" is your movie. Set in New York, director/co-writer Dana Adam Shapiro's small-scale indie ? his first narrative feature after the acclaimed documentary "Murderball" ? charts the obsessive neurosis of Theo (Chris Messina), a wedding photographer whose arty side project is being hired by clients to take their picture unwittingly in on-the-street situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
In "Monogamy," Israeli-born actress Meital Dohan receives top billing for a movie in which she doesn't speak and is only referred to as Subgirl, an e-mail handle. All that's seen of her is what's captured through the lens of Theo (Chris Messina), the photographer protagonist, who unwittingly finds himself chasing this sexually adventurous woman. She is a silent enigma, the one thing standing between an engaged man and monogamy. "The character is a fantasy," Dohan said, perched on a white sofa in her sunny Los Angeles home.
OPINION
November 22, 2009 | By David P. Barash
Right-wing pro-marriage advocates are correct: Monogamy is definitely under siege. But not from uncloseted polyamorists, adolescent "hook-up" advocates, radical feminists, Godless communists or some vast homosexual conspiracy. The culprit is our own biology. Researchers in animal behavior have long known that monogamy is uncommon in the natural world, but only with the advent of DNA "fingerprinting" have we come to appreciate how truly rare it is. Genetic testing has recently shown that even among many bird species -- long touted as the epitome of monogamous fidelity -- it is not uncommon for 6% to 60% of the young to be fathered by someone other than the mother's social partner.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Come for the romance, stay for the oxytocin. That's the neurobiological bottom line on monogamy, according to a new study. Men spritzed with oxytocin, a hormone from the pituitary gland, showed a renewed attraction for the faces of their romantic partners, but not for equally attractive strangers, according to a study published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . And the men weren't just saying so....
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Happy Valentine's Day! It's the perfect day to look at monogamy in the animal kingdom. But if your first thoughts are warm and cuddly, you can wipe away those Disney delusions. When it comes to monogamy among animals, there are few ladies and many tramps. Certain species have been held up historically as models of monogamy -- swans, gibbons, the wolf pack's alpha male and female. But scientific research over time has chipped away at those paragons of virtue. Animals cheat.  MORE: Here's what happens to a brain in love Birds, in particular, were thought to be sexually steadfast with their mates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In the middle of the rainbowy revelers at the pride parade in West Hollywood, Jeremy Stacy was questioned: Are you really bisexual? "One guy came up to me and said, 'You're really gay,' " said Stacy, who was standing under a sign reading "Ask a Bisexual. " "I told him I had a long line of ex-girlfriends who would vehemently disagree. And he said, 'That doesn't matter, because I know you're gay.' " Stacy had gotten the question before. From a friend who said anyone who had slept with men must be gay - even if he had also slept with women.
OPINION
June 1, 2012
Re "Untangling the evolutionary roots of monogamy," May 29 Humans are not monogamous. Among others, Islamic and traditional Mormon societies practice polygamy. Osama bin Laden had several wives, and Mitt Romney's ancestors moved to Mexico to practice polygamy after the U.S. government forced Utah to stop it. Bob Marley had 11 children by several different women; I've had three wives and several girlfriends. Although many societies impose monogamy, it has not evolved.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik
About five years ago, Rashida Jones was seriously mulling a departure from acting. She had gone from a flourishing stage career at Harvard University to one unrewarding audition after another in New York, and she was tired of the grind. She decided to pursue a graduate degree in public policy. "I got the application and everything," Jones said. "And then the role on 'The Office' happened. " That part, as a love interest of John Krasinski's Jim Halpert, ensured that Jones wouldn't be studying qualitative statistics and the new public health movement soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011
'Monogamy' No MPAA rating Running time: 1 hour, 36 minutes Playing: At Laemmle's Sunset 5, West Hollywood; Laemmle's Playhouse 7, Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
In "Monogamy," Israeli-born actress Meital Dohan receives top billing for a movie in which she doesn't speak and is only referred to as Subgirl, an e-mail handle. All that's seen of her is what's captured through the lens of Theo (Chris Messina), the photographer protagonist, who unwittingly finds himself chasing this sexually adventurous woman. She is a silent enigma, the one thing standing between an engaged man and monogamy. "The character is a fantasy," Dohan said, perched on a white sofa in her sunny Los Angeles home.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you ever thought the peekaboo ominousness of "Blow-Up" or "The Conversation" could be the template for a relationship fidelity drama, "Monogamy" is your movie. Set in New York, director/co-writer Dana Adam Shapiro's small-scale indie ? his first narrative feature after the acclaimed documentary "Murderball" ? charts the obsessive neurosis of Theo (Chris Messina), a wedding photographer whose arty side project is being hired by clients to take their picture unwittingly in on-the-street situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik
About five years ago, Rashida Jones was seriously mulling a departure from acting. She had gone from a flourishing stage career at Harvard University to one unrewarding audition after another in New York, and she was tired of the grind. She decided to pursue a graduate degree in public policy. "I got the application and everything," Jones said. "And then the role on 'The Office' happened. " That part, as a love interest of John Krasinski's Jim Halpert, ensured that Jones wouldn't be studying qualitative statistics and the new public health movement soon.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | JAMIE TALAN, Newsday
Patterns of divorce have remained surprisingly constant in almost every culture, suggesting that there may be a biological explanation for why people divorce. Helen Fisher, an associate anthropologist at the American Museum of Natural History, said patterns she identified may have existed throughout much of human history, had acceptance of divorce been as high as it is today. "Given the number of variations and cultural differences, it is amazing that there is any pattern at all," Fisher said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
It's been a long time since Peter and Bobby Farrelly, the onetime wunderkind kings of juvenile comedy, ruled the genre. "Dumb & Dumber," the doofus classic that defined a dorm-room generation, was released back in 1994, and the brothers' last bona fide hit, "Shallow Hal," opened nearly a decade ago. Now Peter, 54, and Bobby, 52, are attempting a comeback by exploring more, er, adult problems. This weekend they open "Hall Pass," their first R-rated comedy in 11 years, about two friends whose wives give them permission to cavort like single men for one week.
OPINION
December 7, 2009 | By Sharon M. Scott
In his Nov. 22 Times Op-Ed article, "Monogamy isn't easy, naturally," biologist David P. Barash claims that because monogamy is rare in the animal world, it is therefore unnatural behavior for humans. The logic of the argument is critically flawed. In stating that dedication to a single individual is "against" human nature and that no one is "cut out for monogamy," Barash fails to recognize that the human is unlike any other creature on the planet. Comparing our behavior patterns to birds or animals may, at times, prove helpful in understanding our species, but it should not be used to determine what is and what is not "natural" for humans.
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