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NEWS
March 9, 2004
When I am on the trail that leads to Monrovia Canyon Falls, I am reminded more of the East Coast than sunny Southern California. The park is a dense woodland, and it certainly doesn't seem like a place you'd find close to an urban area. It's a year-round hike that's equally pretty in all seasons. I started hiking there less than a year ago. I like it because it's easy -- there's not much of an incline -- and it makes me feel like I am far from South Pasadena, where I live.
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NEWS
June 21, 1990
A historic walking trail established in 1907 in the foothills above Monrovia will be restored if the city receives a $50,000 grant from the state's environmental license plate fund. The City Council voted Tuesday to apply for the grant to re-establish the 2.5-mile Ben Overturff Trail, which leads from Monrovia Canyon Park to Deer Park, where the remnants of Overturff's once-popular lodge still stand.
NEWS
November 25, 1990
A hiking trail that has been closed since World War II will be restored and reopened with a $50,000 state environmental grant funded by fees on personalized license plates. Work on the Ben Overturff Trail project has just begun, said Daniel Iwata, manager of the city's Community Services Department, and many details are still being worked out.
TRAVEL
February 28, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
Bureaucratic neglect, trail user fees, severe storms . . . it hasn't been a great year for Southland trails and those who enjoy them. So I'm particularly pleased to report some good trail news: Introducing--drum roll please--the new Overturff Trail, a honey of a footpath that seems destined to become a favorite in the San Gabriel Mountains. The path leads through Sawpit Canyon, owned by the city of Monrovia, which also coordinated trail-building efforts.
NEWS
March 9, 2004
When I am on the trail that leads to Monrovia Canyon Falls, I am reminded more of the East Coast than sunny Southern California. The park is a dense woodland, and it certainly doesn't seem like a place you'd find close to an urban area. It's a year-round hike that's equally pretty in all seasons. I started hiking there less than a year ago. I like it because it's easy -- there's not much of an incline -- and it makes me feel like I am far from South Pasadena, where I live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1990
A hiking trail that has been closed since World War II will be restored and reopened with a $50,000 state environmental grant funded by fees on personalized license plates. Work on the Ben Overturff Trail project has just begun, said Daniel Iwata, manager of the Monrovia Community Services Department. Many details are still being worked out, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2009 | Joshua Lurie
Monrovia is often compared to Mayberry, the idyllic town from "The Andy Griffith Show," but don't let the "Old Town" tag fool you. Monrovia's main strip sits just 10 minutes east of Pasadena, at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains, and it manages to blend its small-town charm with a bustling new energy that appeals to families and hip foodies alike. Old to be new The Peach Cafe (141 E. Colorado Blvd., [626] 599-9092, www.thepeachcafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1998 | Steve Harvey
Al Greenwood, Long Beach's self-described "Bedspread King," had a bout with pneumonia and, when he returned home from the hospital, his doctor recommended a wheelchair for his recovery. Greenwood, age 90, had one delivered. When he no longer needed it, he phoned the hospital supply company to have it picked up. "Why are you returning it?" a company rep asked. "Because I just dropped dead!" roared Greenwood. The rep recorded that answer and dispatched a van.
TRAVEL
February 28, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
Bureaucratic neglect, trail user fees, severe storms . . . it hasn't been a great year for Southland trails and those who enjoy them. So I'm particularly pleased to report some good trail news: Introducing--drum roll please--the new Overturff Trail, a honey of a footpath that seems destined to become a favorite in the San Gabriel Mountains. The path leads through Sawpit Canyon, owned by the city of Monrovia, which also coordinated trail-building efforts.
NEWS
November 25, 1990
A hiking trail that has been closed since World War II will be restored and reopened with a $50,000 state environmental grant funded by fees on personalized license plates. Work on the Ben Overturff Trail project has just begun, said Daniel Iwata, manager of the city's Community Services Department, and many details are still being worked out.
NEWS
June 21, 1990
A historic walking trail established in 1907 in the foothills above Monrovia will be restored if the city receives a $50,000 grant from the state's environmental license plate fund. The City Council voted Tuesday to apply for the grant to re-establish the 2.5-mile Ben Overturff Trail, which leads from Monrovia Canyon Park to Deer Park, where the remnants of Overturff's once-popular lodge still stand.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | KAREN E. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cities and school systems are already desperate and could not maintain adequate education and services under proposed state budget cuts, officials said Wednesday. Monrovia Mayor Robert Bartlett led city and school officials from Monrovia, Arcadia and Duarte in a rousing chorus of, "We're mad as hell, and we're not taking it anymore." Bartlett called the rare joint meeting, held at Monrovia City Hall.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sloshing sound in the swimming pool awoke Gary Potter at 5 a.m. Thursday, but the 42-year-old Monrovia auto body shop owner wasn't too alarmed by an apparent intruder. "I thought it was a raccoon, or maybe a big dog," said Potter, who after 10 years of living in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains has grown accustomed to all manner of wildlife visiting his residence on three acres off Norumbega Drive. Then the sound grew louder.
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