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Montell Griffin

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SPORTS
August 1, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Montell Griffin spent three rounds beating up a South Korean in the Olympic boxing tournament Friday, and U.S. Coach Joe Byrd liked everything about it except the last five seconds. Griffin, his 16-1 light-heavyweight decision in hand, decided to take a victory lap in the final seconds. He skipped counterclockwise around the ring, right hand held high, to the accompaniment of jeers and whistles by many in the crowd of 1,500.
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SPORTS
August 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
Last time, Montell Griffin won the WBC light heavyweight championship while on one knee. This time, Griffin was down on all fours as Roy Jones Jr. won it back Thursday night. "Take my crown and I'm coming to get it," said Jones, who knocked Griffin out at 2:31 of the first round and regained the title he had lost on a disqualification for twice hitting Griffin while he was down on one knee on March 21 at Atlantic City, N.J.
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SPORTS
August 7, 1992 | WALLACE MATTHEWS, Newsday
Despite being the boxer with arguably the worst luck in the Olympics, Montell Griffin has suddenly turned into one loose character. At a network broadcast studio on Wednesday for an interview, Griffin strutted around with a toothpick in his mouth and gladly signed autographs for staff members. "I can get used to this," Griffin observed. At one point, a woman asked him to sign over a photo of a man with slicked-back, thinning hair and a forbidding demeanor. "Who is this?" Griffin asked.
SPORTS
March 22, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Montell Griffin went down to save himself and because he did became the first fighter to beat Roy Jones Jr. "He didn't beat me. I was disqualified," Jones said after he was indeed disqualified in the ninth round Friday night at Atlantic City, N.J., for hitting Griffin while he was down. In the ninth round, Jones hurt Griffin with a right hand and then followed with three more rights and a left that dropped Griffin onto his left knee.
SPORTS
June 27, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Montell Griffin, the Studio City light-heavyweight who needed a lawyer to get into the U.S. Olympic team boxoffs, put his fists to work Friday night and registered the only upset at the opening session of the U.S. Olympic boxing team boxoffs. Griffin knocked off Olympic trials champion Jeremy Williams of Long Beach, 14-11, and wasn't very polite about it.
SPORTS
August 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
Last time, Montell Griffin won the WBC light heavyweight championship while on one knee. This time, Griffin was down on all fours as Roy Jones Jr. won it back Thursday night. "Take my crown and I'm coming to get it," said Jones, who knocked Griffin out at 2:31 of the first round and regained the title he had lost on a disqualification for twice hitting Griffin while he was down on one knee on March 21 at Atlantic City, N.J.
SPORTS
June 25, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers, who have had an impact on the U.S. Olympic track and field trials because of the Butch Reynolds case, have also helped change the course of the U.S. boxing trials. Montell Griffin, a Studio City light-heavyweight who reached the Olympic trials tournament final June 14 but was not chosen to compete in this weekend's Olympic boxoffs, is back in the competition. After his Los Angeles attorney, Mitchell Stein, threatened USA Boxing with a lawsuit, the U.S.
SPORTS
June 29, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possibly the most intriguing story of the 1992 U.S. Olympic boxing team is the last story about its selection. It's about The Man From Nowhere, a boxer who refused to pack up and go home when he was told to forget about Barcelona. First, Montell Griffin got a lawyer. Then, with some legal help, he rode into Phoenix on Wednesday and on Sunday afternoon secured the last berth on the Olympic team.
SPORTS
August 6, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
Had Jack Dempsey started out in the Olympics instead of the Wild West bars and barges, we never would have heard of the Manassa Mauler, the Long Count, the Wild Bull of the Pampas, Luis Firpo, Boyle's Thirty Acres or any of the things that helped make the Twenties Roaring. Had Joe Louis started out in them, we never would have had a Brown Bomber, Bum of the Month, Friday Night Fights. Madison Square Garden would have been dark.
SPORTS
August 9, 1992 | TONY KORNHEISER, WASHINGTON POST
Forgive me if you're getting tired of me saying this every four years, but boxing is my favorite Olympic venue. On any given day there will be more good stories, more loopy characters and more bizarre scenes at the boxing than anywhere else in the Games. At what other sport would the athletes deliberately miss the spit sink and hock a loogie on the ringside judges? You want stories? Montell Griffin has a heartbreaker.
SPORTS
February 19, 1995 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a flawed but crowning performance, Oscar De La Hoya sidestepped the remaining doubters and dived head-first into a respected reigning champion, John John Molina, leaving the ring Saturday night with a unanimous-decision victory and the boxing world wanting more. De La Hoya (17-0, 15 knockouts) retained his World Boxing Organization lightweight title before 6,272 at the MGM Grand Garden, surviving the tenacious Molina (36-4, 26 KOs) and some shaky middle rounds.
SPORTS
August 9, 1992 | TONY KORNHEISER, WASHINGTON POST
Forgive me if you're getting tired of me saying this every four years, but boxing is my favorite Olympic venue. On any given day there will be more good stories, more loopy characters and more bizarre scenes at the boxing than anywhere else in the Games. At what other sport would the athletes deliberately miss the spit sink and hock a loogie on the ringside judges? You want stories? Montell Griffin has a heartbreaker.
SPORTS
August 7, 1992 | WALLACE MATTHEWS, Newsday
Despite being the boxer with arguably the worst luck in the Olympics, Montell Griffin has suddenly turned into one loose character. At a network broadcast studio on Wednesday for an interview, Griffin strutted around with a toothpick in his mouth and gladly signed autographs for staff members. "I can get used to this," Griffin observed. At one point, a woman asked him to sign over a photo of a man with slicked-back, thinning hair and a forbidding demeanor. "Who is this?" Griffin asked.
SPORTS
August 6, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
Had Jack Dempsey started out in the Olympics instead of the Wild West bars and barges, we never would have heard of the Manassa Mauler, the Long Count, the Wild Bull of the Pampas, Luis Firpo, Boyle's Thirty Acres or any of the things that helped make the Twenties Roaring. Had Joe Louis started out in them, we never would have had a Brown Bomber, Bum of the Month, Friday Night Fights. Madison Square Garden would have been dark.
SPORTS
August 5, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tim Austin, a spidery flyweight from Cincinnati, was the only American among four to survive the final round of quarterfinal bouts Tuesday at the Olympic boxing tournament. Austin scored a 19-8 victory over Tanzania's Benjamin Mwangata, but Americans Larry Donald, Raul Marquez and Montell Griffin lost. Even Cuba had a bad day. First, Faustino Reyes of Spain scored a 17-7 decision over Cuban featherweight Eddy Suarez, ending Cuba's winning streak at 20 bouts.
SPORTS
August 1, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Montell Griffin spent three rounds beating up a South Korean in the Olympic boxing tournament Friday, and U.S. Coach Joe Byrd liked everything about it except the last five seconds. Griffin, his 16-1 light-heavyweight decision in hand, decided to take a victory lap in the final seconds. He skipped counterclockwise around the ring, right hand held high, to the accompaniment of jeers and whistles by many in the crowd of 1,500.
SPORTS
February 19, 1995 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a flawed but crowning performance, Oscar De La Hoya sidestepped the remaining doubters and dived head-first into a respected reigning champion, John John Molina, leaving the ring Saturday night with a unanimous-decision victory and the boxing world wanting more. De La Hoya (17-0, 15 knockouts) retained his World Boxing Organization lightweight title before 6,272 at the MGM Grand Garden, surviving the tenacious Molina (36-4, 26 KOs) and some shaky middle rounds.
SPORTS
June 29, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possibly the most intriguing story of the 1992 U.S. Olympic boxing team is the last story about its selection. It's about The Man From Nowhere, a boxer who refused to pack up and go home when he was told to forget about Barcelona. First, Montell Griffin got a lawyer. Then, with some legal help, he rode into Phoenix on Wednesday and on Sunday afternoon secured the last berth on the Olympic team.
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