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Montenegro Yugoslavia

NEWS
February 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Balkan issues dominated the State Department's agenda Friday, with visits by Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, Montenegrin President Milo Djukanovic and Ibrahim Rugova, the leader of Kosovo's ethnic Albanians. Rugova said he and Secretary of State Colin L. Powell have an "understanding in general" that independence for Kosovo should be supported. But a State Department official said the independence issue never came up during Powell's meeting with Rugova.
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NEWS
October 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
In a major policy shift, President Slobodan Milosevic will allow pro-Western Montenegro to leave the Yugoslav federation without bloodshed if the republic decides to do so, Serbian officials said Friday. "We'll never resolve the problems that exist between Montenegro and Yugoslavia with force," Yugoslav Vice Premier Tomislav Nikolic told the independent Palma Plus TV.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From Reuters
The leaders of Yugoslavia's six republics said they made progress in talks at a crisis summit Thursday but failed to solve their bitter disputes. Tension still ran high in Croatia after three people were killed in a gun battle Sunday between Serbs and Croats, the largest ethnic groups. Bombs exploded overnight, and Serbs sealed off some towns in Croatia with barricades.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Parliament of the southern republic of Macedonia voted Thursday to seek diplomatic recognition from the European Community, raising the threat of still more ethnic unrest in this war-ravaged country. Ethnic Serbian minorities in Macedonia and in Bosnia-Herzegovina have threatened to take up arms if the two republics make good on their pledges to seek independence. The Serbian government said Wednesday that it would recognize the Serb-dominated regions of Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
WORLD
April 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
Police have filed charges against former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and several of his allies in the abduction and killing of a former Serbian president, officials said Thursday. Police investigating the March 12 assassination of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic found the remains of former Serbian President Ivan Stambolic last month. Stambolic was once Milosevic's mentor, but the two politicians later became bitter rivals.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest demonstrations ever against Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's rule, about 150,000 people sang, waved flags and cheered Wednesday night in support of Vojislav Kostunica, the opposition leader they believe will soon take power. But just hours before the joyous rally in central Belgrade, Foreign Minister Zivadin Jovanovic again accused foreign governments and news media of plotting to remove Milosevic, suggesting that the Yugoslav leader isn't about to admit defeat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1985 | BEN SHERWOOD, Times Staff Writer
In a special way, Luis Monreal, the newly appointed director of the Getty Conservation Institute, is looking more to the future than the past. For your typical student of archeology and art history, this might seem a bit odd, but not for Monreal, who has headed the International Council of Museums here for 11 years.
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities may have found a superbly ironic loophole allowing them to hand Slobodan Milosevic to the U.N. war crimes tribunal, but they also have triggered a storm of criticism and may have touched off Yugoslavia's next big political crisis. Ignoring a court ruling earlier in the day, democratic reformers based their move Thursday on a constitutional clause designed by the onetime strongman to reinforce his grip on power.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reformist majority in the Yugoslav Cabinet, overriding resistance from coalition partners and fierce criticism from political opponents, rammed through a decree Saturday authorizing the transfer of war crimes suspects to the U.N. tribunal in The Hague. That endorsement set the stage for the transfer of 16 indictees, including former President Slobodan Milosevic, to begin in a "matter of days," Deputy Prime Minister Miroljub Labus told a news conference.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of his time in power, former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic ran a sort of shell game with his country's economy, shifting resources from one spot to another, always a step ahead of disaster. Democratic reformers came out on top in Belgrade just as the bill came due.
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