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Monterey Bay

NEWS
March 13, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One day before an urban warfare exercise in Monterey, the Navy and Marines canceled plans Friday to land hundreds of soldiers on the beach and will instead drop them off by helicopter at the city airport. The decision came after the state Coastal Commission concluded Thursday that the Urban Warrior operation could disturb federally protected wildlife in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. "I'm very disappointed, and I think the people of Monterey are too," said Lt. Col.
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NEWS
March 12, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Monterey welcomes more than 1.5 million tourists each year, but thousands of visitors of a slightly different sort will descend Saturday on the coastal city made famous by John Steinbeck's novel "Cannery Row." A Marine Corps urban warfare exercise will bring 6,000 troops to Monterey Bay to test the tactics and equipment likely to be used if U.S. troops are deployed to coastal cities abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marine biologists are scrambling to discover why California sea otters, the fuzzy, brown-eyed darlings of the Monterey Bay, are declining rapidly. A fall survey found the sea otter population between Santa Cruz and Point Conception had dropped 12% from one year earlier, pushing the already federally protected species closer to endangered status. Since then about nine a month have been washing up on beaches.
NEWS
June 13, 1998 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Clinton came to the shore of Monterey Bay on Friday to announce a 10-year extension of the federal ban on new oil and gas drilling off the nation's East and West coasts and a stepped-up effort to protect the world's fish population. Standing on a hastily built stage on a municipal beach off Cannery Row, with the shimmering bay as a backdrop, Clinton listed a series of new and old environmental actions and promised "to preserve our living oceans as a sacred legacy for all time to come."
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | Associated Press
A white, glue-like substance that washed ashore at Sunset State Beach, along with more than 15 dead shorebirds, is a nontoxic fish oil, officials said Saturday. The oil--which can be found in large slicks in Monterey Bay--poses no threat to humans. However, once birds dive into it, many are not able to fly and often die of hypothermia, officials said.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Denver, the earnest "country boy" who soared to fame in the 1970s with sunny, folksy, just-this-side-of-corny songs such as "Rocky Mountain High," died when an experimental plane he recently purchased crashed into Monterey Bay during a test flight. He was 53. Denver's Long-EZ plane--a home-built, single-engine two-seater--plunged into a marine sanctuary thick with seals and sea otters Sunday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1997 | STEVE PADILLA
One could say Gaspar de Portola put the San Fernando Valley on the map. After all, he was the first European to find it. Portola, governor of Baja California, led an expedition of 61 Spanish soldiers and two Franciscan missionaries to find Monterey Bay in 1769. On Aug. 5, they reached the top of the Sepulveda Pass and looked down on a rich valley. Portola had left San Diego on July 14 and hoped to rediscover Monterey Bay as a way to check Russian expansion in Northern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1997 | DAWN HOBBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County Community College trustees have tapped the youngest university in the Cal State system for the new president of Oxnard College. Steven F. Arvizu, executive vice president at CSU Monterey Bay, was appointed to the $110,000-a-year job Tuesday by district trustees, who had searched more than a year to fill the post. Although he won't begin his new duties until July 7, Arvizu plans to attend Friday's graduation so that he can meet the graduates and community members.
TRAVEL
December 29, 1996 | JOHN McKINNEY
North of the city of Monterey is a diverse coastline that rewards the curious hiker--beaches, bluff tops and wetlands. Providing a dramatic backdrop to these northern beaches are some of the Central Coast's tallest dunes, handsomely shaped sand mounds that are the habitat for rare native plants and animals. Elkhorn Slough, the Central California Coast's second-largest salt marsh, preserves crucial habitat for waterfowl.
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