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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2001 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ballet companies may have their swan solos, but modern dance has an equally impressive bird variation--the lesser-known "Awassa Astrige/Ostrich" made by Asadata Dafora in 1932. Masterfully performed by G.D. Harris on Saturday night at the Luckman Theatre on the campus of Cal State L.A., it was one of the highlights of the first Southern California appearance by the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company.
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SPORTS
October 29, 2004 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
If you're reading this today, they were wrong. The Boston Red Sox won the World Series and the world did not end. The apocalypse, certain to be upon us as soon as the Red Sox tampered with the time continuum and the forces of nature by sweeping the St. Louis Cardinals on Wednesday night for their first World Series championship since 1918, never happened. Boston did not vaporize. Buildings around Fenway Park were not reduced to rubble.
HEALTH
December 29, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Some joggers report a "runner's high" after exercising for extended periods, but Canadian researchers have found that longer runs are not always better when it comes to mood improvement. They recruited 69 physically active women from university recreation classes and running clubs and divided them into three groups. Two groups were instructed to get their heart rate up to 70% of its maximum while running on an indoor track. One group ran 25 minutes, the other ran 40 minutes.
MAGAZINE
January 18, 1987 | DAVID HOCKNEY
From August through October, 1983, Hockney set himself the task of drawing a self-portrait virtually every day. All of the works on these pages are charcoal on paper. "They were drawn mostly early in the morning," he says. "I noticed if you did this they were always different: Not only did you have different expressions, you also had totally different moods and feelings, and that affects your mind. I realized that your mood is reflected in the way you draw the lines and marks.
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