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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Angelenos flocked outside to balconies, parking lots and Griffith Park on Monday night for the first full lunar eclipse of the year, a "blood moon. "  Steven Bevacqua caught this shot just as the clouds cleared up. He used a Canon EOS REBEL T1i. Follow Samantha Schaefer on  Twitter . Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our  Flickr page  or  reader submission gallery .  Follow us on Twitter  and on  Instagram  or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments  for more on this photo series.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Moone Boy" (Hulu). Tall and shaggy Chris O'Dowd, whom you may have seen in "The IT Crowd," "Bridesmaids," "Girls" or Christopher Guest's dear departed "Family Tree" -- or even possibly on Broadway, where he is now playing opposite James Franco in a revival of "Of Mice and Men" -- is back with a second season of his delightful Irish-made, Hulu-hosted series, "Moone Boy. " Written with Nick Vincent Murphy, it is a memory piece -- the year as we...
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OPINION
July 4, 2012
Re "Long night? It was, by a second," July 1 You tell us that timekeepers have added a leap second to our clocks to match the Earth's spin, saying we are rotating "a bit slowly. " The phrase should have been that we are rotating a bit slower and will continue to do so. The moon, which has a tremendous gravitational effect on our planet, is moving away at the rate of nearly three inches per year, and as it does so, Earth's spin slows. The moon, which is now 240,000 miles away, was created when the Earth was young, and it loomed as a giant in our skies, being only a few thousand miles away.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Richard Simon
Thousands of bills are introduced in a congressional session, but only a fraction become law. Even without that success, they call attention to their causes - or their sponsors. Here are a few of the eclectic measures awaiting action in Congress. Apollo Lunar Landing Legacy Act: Would establish the Apollo Lunar Landing Sites National Historical Park on the moon. Argument for: "In 1969, led by the late Apollo astronaut Neil Armstrong, American ingenuity changed history as humanity took a giant leap forward on the surface of the moon," said Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Md.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Not long ago, while sorting through old books, I found a copy of Eric Carle's “Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me,” dedicated to his daughter Kirsten and first published in 1986. This was one of my favorite books to read to my son Noah when he was little, the story of a father, his daughter Monica and the moon. Part of what attracted me to the book was what attracted me to pretty much every other Carle title I can remember - its quality of tactile interaction, of literally pulling its readers in. And yet "Papa" is different, because the story it tells, with its various fold-ins and fold-outs, is not about a hungry caterpillar or a grouchy ladybug, but rather about a father so in love with his child that he will do anything for her, even capture the moon.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
All the Pledge in the world couldn't keep the dust off a lunar rover parked in the wrong part of the moon, according to a new study. Presenting at a meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society in Scotland, Farideh Honary of the University of Lancaster used computer simulations to show that moon dust becomes electrically charged, like a plasma, in a region of the moon called “the terminator.” This region is at the boundary between night and...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009
'The Twilight Saga: New Moon' MPAA rating: PG-13 for some violence and action Running time: 2 hours, 10 minutes Playing: In general release
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2010 | By Anna Gorman
New Year's Eve celebrations were a bit brighter this year with a blue moon shining in the sky Thursday night. A blue moon -- the second full moon in a month -- isn't really uncommon, occurring on average every 2 1/2 years. But "on New Year's Eve it is very rare," said Scott Kardel, a spokesman for the Palomar Observatory in San Diego County. The last one was in 1990. The name is a bit misleading -- the moon does not appear blue. Rather, the name refers to the expression "once in a blue moon."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
James May begins his new documentary, "James May on the Moon" (BBC America, 8 p.m. Tuesday), where he belongs: in a car, on the ground. He's a host of "Top Gear," the cheeky British automobile variety show, and on that show, he passes for unambitious, the lumbering turtle up against Jeremy Clarkson's fox and Richard Hammond's rabbit. But May, it turns out, wants to go faster than any "Top Gear" segment could allow. A space enthusiast, he's used his bully pulpit to film "James May on the Moon," about the Apollo moon landings and his fascination with Earth's satellite, where -- spoiler alert -- he does not in fact end up. This extravagant hourlong program is actually three documentaries in one, leaving what must certainly be a tremendous amount of footage unused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996
Full moons may make some people crazy. But to a group of Westside residents, a full moon means a nocturnal workout. The outdoorsy Brentwood residents hike in the Santa Monica Mountains on the evenings of full moons. Mark Stevens, who owns a fitness gym in Brentwood, says he has led groups of between five and 20 people on full-moon mountain hikes for the past eight years. "The full moon is so bright you don't even need a flashlight," Stevens said. "It's very mystical."
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Amina Khan
NASA's LADEE mission ended with a bang when the spacecraft crashed into the lunar surface Thursday. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer smashed into the dark side of the moon between 9:30 and 10:22 p.m., according to NASA officials. The vending-machine-sized spacecraft ran out of fuel and collided with the moon at a speed of roughly 3,600 miles per hour -- or “about three times the speed of a high-powered rifle bullet,” Rick Elphic, LADEE project scientist at NASA Ames Research Center said in a statement.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | Deborah Netburn and Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the total lunar eclipse known as a "blood moon. " Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles offered a prime view, and hundreds of people were there when the eclipse began at 10:58 p.m. Monday. The full moon was beginning to move into Earth's shadow, leaving the impression that someone had taken a bite out of it. As the minutes passed, the shadow spread across more and more of the lunar surface.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the "blood moon," the first full lunar eclipse of 2014. Hundreds converged on Griffith Observatory, which has a prime view. Here are some photos of the eclipse posted to various social media from the observatory on Tuesday morning:  [<a href="//storify.com/shelbygrad/full-lunar-eclipse-capturing-blood-moon-live" target="_blank">View the story "Full lunar eclipse: Capturing 'blood moon' live" on Storify</a>]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By a Los Angeles Times staff writer
  Monday's "blood moon" total lunar eclipse was the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. Hundreds flocked to Griffith Observatory, cameras, cellphones and iPads at the ready to see the rare event. Some came hours before the lunar spectacle, but a hush fell over the balconies and grassy lawn as the eclipse began and onlookers jockeyed for prime viewing spots.  In Los Angeles , the most impressive part began about 11 p.m. when the first "bite" was taken out of the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Those who slept through the rare "blood moon" Monday night missed more than just the rare red hue, as a packed Griffith Observatory erupted into whistles, cheers and howls during the much-anticipated lunar eclipse. The crowds descended upon the observatory early, with hundreds of people lounging on the lawn hours before the eclipse was set to begin at about 11 p.m. The observatory and the Los Angeles Astronomical Society, as well as other astronomy clubs and organizations, offered telescopes for viewers. As forecasters had predicted, clear skies made for for prime viewing conditions across the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Angelenos flocked outside to balconies, parking lots and Griffith Park on Monday night for the first full lunar eclipse of the year, a "blood moon. "  Steven Bevacqua caught this shot just as the clouds cleared up. He used a Canon EOS REBEL T1i. Follow Samantha Schaefer on  Twitter . Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our  Flickr page  or  reader submission gallery .  Follow us on Twitter  and on  Instagram  or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments  for more on this photo series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
Re "Promising the Moon--for $15.99," June 23: Sorry, Dennis Hope, you're 35 years too late in claiming the moon! My name and about 40 others have been staked on the lunar surface since the early '60s. While working at Pasadena's JPL on the Ranger project, we had the names of all the system test team inscribed on gold-plated shims, which were installed on the Ranger spacecraft. It was designed to impact the lunar surface after sending back TV pictures for the Apollo landing sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998
Re "Water Possibly Found on Moon," March 6: I find it a little more than coincidental that just as the American public is beginning to grumble about the billions of taxpayers' dollars being squandered by NASA on its outer space joy rides, it is announced that water has been "possibly" found on the moon. How convenient that after almost three long decades, a discovery is publicized that would give the taxpayers a little return on their "investment." The entire article seems to be based on hypotheses and conjectures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
The crowd packed on the grassy lawn of Griffith Observatory erupted in whistles, cheers and howls shortly before 12:05 a.m. on Tuesday as a darkened moon transformed into an orange "blood moon" for the start of a total lunar eclipse. Visitors scrambled toward the front of the observatory, pointing up at the reddening moon. Telescopes dotting the lawn pointed upward and southward, as the moon hovered above. Around 11 p.m., a "bite" began to spread across the moon as the Earth blocked direct light from the sun, casting a shadow on the moon.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Stayed up well past my bedtime Monday night to catch the “blood moon.” Wish I would've known that it was a sign of the apocalypse - I might have lingered a little longer. What's that? You didn't know either? That's OK - that's why God (or Al Gore) invented the Internet. Sarah Pulliam Bailey has the particulars over at Religion News Service in her story , “ 'Blood moon' sets off apocalyptic debate among some Christians.” Full disclosure: I mostly skipped Sunday school.
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