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SCIENCE
May 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Russian and European space agencies agreed jointly to build a vehicle for six-person flights around the moon, where only the U.S. has landed. Roscosmos and the European Space Agency chose a conical rather than winged design for the planned spacecraft after six months of study, Roscosmos said this week. The vehicle is to be used in near-Earth and low-lunar orbits. Roscosmos agreed to prepare a delivery rocket for testing by 2015, with people expected to begin flying three years later.
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SCIENCE
April 4, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have found strong evidence of a watery sea beneath the icy surface of Enceladus, a moon that orbits Saturn and squirts jets of water vapor into one of the planet's rings. The dramatic jets, which emerge from cracks in the moon's surface, have long tantalized scientists looking for signs of liquid water elsewhere in the solar system. Now, using gravitational data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, the researchers have determined that Enceladus hosts a vast southern sea roughly the size of Lake Superior.
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SCIENCE
August 1, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Enceladus, the icy moon that circles Saturn and shoots out jets of water, emits a much larger amount of water at the farthest point in its orbit, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. The discovery backs up a years-old theory and provides the researchers with fresh insight into this geophysically intriguing body. Enceladus, named after one of the giant children of mother Earth in Greek mythology, has long intrigued planetary scientists (as well as astrobiologists wondering if primitive life could exist in extreme environments)
SCIENCE
March 16, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
) The largest lunar impact ever caught on camera took place last Sept. 11, when a small asteroid 2 to 4.5 feet in length slammed into our moon's pockmarked surface at 37,900 mph. The resulting explosion caused a flash of light that briefly burned as bright as the north star, Polaris, and lingered for 8.5 seconds. It also left a new crater on the moon that scientists estimate to be about 130 feet in diameter.  On Sunday, at 6 p.m. PDT, the website Slooh will point its telescopes at a part of the moon known as Mare Nubium where the recent impact occurred, and you are invited to watch the show live, right here.
OPINION
July 4, 2012
Re "Long night? It was, by a second," July 1 You tell us that timekeepers have added a leap second to our clocks to match the Earth's spin, saying we are rotating "a bit slowly. " The phrase should have been that we are rotating a bit slower and will continue to do so. The moon, which has a tremendous gravitational effect on our planet, is moving away at the rate of nearly three inches per year, and as it does so, Earth's spin slows. The moon, which is now 240,000 miles away, was created when the Earth was young, and it loomed as a giant in our skies, being only a few thousand miles away.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
All the Pledge in the world couldn't keep the dust off a lunar rover parked in the wrong part of the moon, according to a new study. Presenting at a meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society in Scotland, Farideh Honary of the University of Lancaster used computer simulations to show that moon dust becomes electrically charged, like a plasma, in a region of the moon called “the terminator.” This region is at the boundary between night and...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Not long ago, while sorting through old books, I found a copy of Eric Carle's “Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me,” dedicated to his daughter Kirsten and first published in 1986. This was one of my favorite books to read to my son Noah when he was little, the story of a father, his daughter Monica and the moon. Part of what attracted me to the book was what attracted me to pretty much every other Carle title I can remember - its quality of tactile interaction, of literally pulling its readers in. And yet "Papa" is different, because the story it tells, with its various fold-ins and fold-outs, is not about a hungry caterpillar or a grouchy ladybug, but rather about a father so in love with his child that he will do anything for her, even capture the moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009
'The Twilight Saga: New Moon' MPAA rating: PG-13 for some violence and action Running time: 2 hours, 10 minutes Playing: In general release
SCIENCE
June 13, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
Nearly four decades after astronaut Neil Armstrong planted his boot on the surface of the moon, the U.S. is about to take the first small step toward colonizing Earth's tag-along satellite. On Wednesday, NASA is scheduled to launch a robotic mission aimed at finding the best site for Earth's first off-world colony, the centuries-old dream of science fiction writers and utopians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2010 | By Anna Gorman
New Year's Eve celebrations were a bit brighter this year with a blue moon shining in the sky Thursday night. A blue moon -- the second full moon in a month -- isn't really uncommon, occurring on average every 2 1/2 years. But "on New Year's Eve it is very rare," said Scott Kardel, a spokesman for the Palomar Observatory in San Diego County. The last one was in 1990. The name is a bit misleading -- the moon does not appear blue. Rather, the name refers to the expression "once in a blue moon."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Jeff Vandermeer
In "Black Moon," first-time novelist Kenneth Calhoun documents a plague of sleeplessness that threatens the very fabric of the world and reality. The sleepless have hallucinations and turn into the equivalent of manic, deranged zombies, while those who can still sleep struggle to maintain order, or even certainty, amid rising chaos. It's an intriguing premise, riffing as it does on the fading divide between work and free time, the virtual and real worlds, as well as modern fears of a virus-borne apocalypse.
SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | By Amina Khan
For a brief moment last September, a flash on the moon shone about as bright as the North Star, Polaris,  giving away the biggest crash from a space rock hitting the lunar surface ever caught on camera, astronomers say. The discovery -- "the brightest and longest confirmed impact flash," according to the study authors -- was detailed in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and reveals that perhaps 10 times as many small rocky bodies...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By David Pagel
Scott Reeder's first solo show in Los Angeles does double duty, two times over. At 356 S. Mission Road, the multipurpose extravaganza is both an exhibition of big abstract paintings and the set for “Moon Dust,” a DIY film that the Detroit-based artist has been working on for eight years. Reeder's movie is made with amateur actors on a set that is more "Captain Kangaroo" than "Star Wars. " It takes place on a lunar resort that has seen better days and looks as if it's going out of business.
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
It was as if the scoreboard was malfunctioning. The leaders at the Northern Trust Open were tracked with precision - every hole, every shot. Suddenly, a guy who barely had any business playing the tournament was threatening the course record. As word spread throughout Riviera Country Club, fans scampered to catch up to this birdie machine. So did the Golf Channel cameras, a pretty heady notion for a player all too often not ready for prime time. For Jason Allred, this was the round of his life.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- China's Jade Rabbit lunar rover, feared to have suffered some irreparable technical difficulties, may yet have some spring in its step. In late January, Chinese authorities said the rover -- which arrived on the moon in mid-December -- had experienced mechanical abnormalities just before it was to enter a two-week dormancy during the moon's long, frigid night. The moon buggy, anthropomorphized through a microblog account, sent out some bleak but stoic messages about its apparently dire fate: "Masters are working round the clock.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have a new map -- the best created so far -- of the largest moon in our solar system, Ganymede, and it is both beautiful and revealing. Ganymede is technically a satellite of Jupiter, but it is really a world unto itself. It is bigger than both Mercury and Pluto. If it orbited the sun rather than Jupiter, we would likely consider it a planet.  If we could peer deep beneath its icy surface, we might find a liquid ocean. And deep beneath that, at the center of the moon, there may be a different type of ice that forms under extreme pressure, scientists said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996
Full moons may make some people crazy. But to a group of Westside residents, a full moon means a nocturnal workout. The outdoorsy Brentwood residents hike in the Santa Monica Mountains on the evenings of full moons. Mark Stevens, who owns a fitness gym in Brentwood, says he has led groups of between five and 20 people on full-moon mountain hikes for the past eight years. "The full moon is so bright you don't even need a flashlight," Stevens said. "It's very mystical."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
James May begins his new documentary, "James May on the Moon" (BBC America, 8 p.m. Tuesday), where he belongs: in a car, on the ground. He's a host of "Top Gear," the cheeky British automobile variety show, and on that show, he passes for unambitious, the lumbering turtle up against Jeremy Clarkson's fox and Richard Hammond's rabbit. But May, it turns out, wants to go faster than any "Top Gear" segment could allow. A space enthusiast, he's used his bully pulpit to film "James May on the Moon," about the Apollo moon landings and his fascination with Earth's satellite, where -- spoiler alert -- he does not in fact end up. This extravagant hourlong program is actually three documentaries in one, leaving what must certainly be a tremendous amount of footage unused.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Soleil Moon Frye has announced her new son's name and, boy oh boy, did girlfriend not disappoint with this one! "Welcome to the world Lyric Sonny Roads Goldberg!" Frye announced Wednesday on her blog . "Can't wait to share our pics and moments in the upcoming months. Thanks for all the love and support. " Frye, married to Jason Goldberg, has two daughters also: Jagger Joseph Blue, 8, and Poet Sienna Rose, 5½. The new little guy - we're not sure if they're calling him Lyric, or Sonny or something else entirely - arrived Monday night, with Mom making the birth announcement Tuesday on Twitter.
SCIENCE
January 27, 2014 | By Amina Khan
China's Jade Rabbit moon rover experienced a “mechanical control abnormality” over the weekend, according to the official Xinhua news agency, just as it was set to go to "sleep" for the long lunar night. "Goodnight, Earth. Goodnight, humans. " Those were the words in a "first-person" account from the rover's perspective that was published in Chinese state media after the robot experienced some troubling technical difficulties. Officials with China's State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said scientists are now organizing an overhaul, according to state-run CCTV . China's Chang'e 3 spacecraft made headlines last month after becoming the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the lunar surface in nearly four decades . The last one before that was the Soviet Union's Luna 24 mission, sent to collect samples in 1976.
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