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SCIENCE
October 8, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
In the predawn hours Friday, while those on the West Coast still snooze, a rocket is scheduled to punch a 13-foot-deep hole in a crater at the moon's south pole that hasn't seen sunlight in billions of years. The purpose: to find out whether ice lies hidden there. NASA's Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, which set out for the moon in June, made a late-course correction Tuesday to better position itself to steer the rocket into the 2-mile-deep crater Cabeus at 4:30 a.m. PDT on Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Mike Anton
When the Apollo 11 astronauts blasted off from the moon, they left behind not just the small steps of men but a giant pile of equipment and junk for all of mankind. Some of the 5,000 pounds of stuff Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin abandoned at Tranquility Base was purposeful: a seismic detector to record moonquakes and meteorite impacts; a laser-reflection device to make precise distance measurements between Earth and the moon; a U.S. flag and commemorative plaque. Some was unavoidable: Apollo 11's lunar module descent stage wasn't designed to be carted back home, for instance.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin's condominium in Westwood is up for sale at $3.3 million. Built in 1990, the three-bedroom, 3.5-bathroom condo features an open floor plan, floor-to-ceiling windows and two balconies. The corner unit has 3,143 square feet of living space. Aldrin, 82, was one of the first astronauts to walk on the moon in 1969. He paid $1.34 million for the property in 1998, public records show. Karen and Steven Heiferman of Hilton & Hyland are the listing agents.
SCIENCE
May 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
When asteroid 1998 QE2 makes its closest approach to Earth on Friday, it will not be traveling alone: The massive space rock is hurtling through space accompanied by its own moon. It is not unheard of for an asteroid to have a moon, or satellite, accompanying it on its journey, but it is rare. Just 16% of asteroids that are 655 feet across or larger are part of a binary or triple system,  according to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Asteroid 1998 QE2's moon was revealed when NASA scientists were finally able to get a closer look at the incoming asteroid using the 230-foot Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2011 | Stephen Ceasar
As the sun sets in the west Saturday, the biggest, brightest moon in about 20 years will begin peeking over the eastern horizon. The so-called "supermoon" will appear about 14% bigger and 30% brighter than normal, according to NASA. Because the moon's orbit is oval, there is a point where it is the closest to the Earth, known as its perigee. The farthest point is its apogee. On Saturday, the moon's closest perigee of the year happens to occur within one hour of the monthly astronomical phase of the full moon, which together will create the rarely seen spectacle of illumination and size, said Geoff Chester, an astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan's space agency announced Thursday that it plans to send its first probe around the moon in August. The $269-million Selene, or Selenological and Engineering Explorer, will be carried into space by a Japanese-built H-2A rocket, the agency said. During its one-year mission, the probe is to release two small satellites to measure the moon's magnetic and gravitational fields. Selene will be launched from the remote southern island of Tanegashima.
SPORTS
October 27, 2007
Who would've thought that Major League Baseball would return to the Coliseum before the NFL did? Dan Rendant Arcadia
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
NASA made final preparations Sunday for the launch of a low-cost, water-seeking robot probe to the moon, its first mission to Earth's closest celestial neighbor in 25 years. The Lunar Prospector probe was scheduled to blast off from Cape Canaveral today at 5:31 p.m. PST and to establish an orbit around the moon by the end of the week.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
On July 20, 1969, millions of people around the world gathered in front of black-and-white television sets to see the unbelievable -- the first man walking on the moon. Forty-three years later, Jason Kottke, the guy behind the blog Kottke.org, invites you to gather around your computers and watch the exact same broadcast in a live online event. He has created a Web page where you can see the original CBS News coverage of the event, complete with Walter Cronkite reporting and an old television frame to heighten the nostalgic experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1989 | BEN SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
Sky gazers in Southern California and much of the rest of the planet will witness a total lunar eclipse tonight, weather permitting, as the moon orbits opposite the sun and makes a rare pass through Earth's shadow. Beginning at 6:21 p.m. PDT, the rising full moon will travel into the outer region of this shadow, called the penumbra, and to viewers in the eastern United States and much of the world it will appear that the normally white lunar surface gradually changes to orange or red.
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