Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMoon
IN THE NEWS

Moon

NATIONAL
March 19, 2011 | Stephen Ceasar
As the sun sets in the west Saturday, the biggest, brightest moon in about 20 years will begin peeking over the eastern horizon. The so-called "supermoon" will appear about 14% bigger and 30% brighter than normal, according to NASA. Because the moon's orbit is oval, there is a point where it is the closest to the Earth, known as its perigee. The farthest point is its apogee. On Saturday, the moon's closest perigee of the year happens to occur within one hour of the monthly astronomical phase of the full moon, which together will create the rarely seen spectacle of illumination and size, said Geoff Chester, an astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
April 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan's space agency announced Thursday that it plans to send its first probe around the moon in August. The $269-million Selene, or Selenological and Engineering Explorer, will be carried into space by a Japanese-built H-2A rocket, the agency said. During its one-year mission, the probe is to release two small satellites to measure the moon's magnetic and gravitational fields. Selene will be launched from the remote southern island of Tanegashima.
SPORTS
October 27, 2007
Who would've thought that Major League Baseball would return to the Coliseum before the NFL did? Dan Rendant Arcadia
SCIENCE
May 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
When asteroid 1998 QE2 makes its closest approach to Earth on Friday, it will not be traveling alone: The massive space rock is hurtling through space accompanied by its own moon. It is not unheard of for an asteroid to have a moon, or satellite, accompanying it on its journey, but it is rare. Just 16% of asteroids that are 655 feet across or larger are part of a binary or triple system,  according to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Asteroid 1998 QE2's moon was revealed when NASA scientists were finally able to get a closer look at the incoming asteroid using the 230-foot Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Scientists believe that the glow from one extremely cold crater on the moon is due to ice, and now they are aglow too. What does moon ice mean for space exploration?  It could be a huge "lunar freezer," acting as a source of water for a nearby lunar base.  Think "man on the moon" -- but in a much more permanent way. "Frozen water in particular could be a resource for future human explorers," said Ashwin R. Vasavada, a planetary scientist for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, in an interview Thursday morning with the Los Angeles Times.  SPACE IMAGES: Mickey on Mercury and more The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter was sent to the moon in 2009 with a mission of mapping its surface.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
NASA made final preparations Sunday for the launch of a low-cost, water-seeking robot probe to the moon, its first mission to Earth's closest celestial neighbor in 25 years. The Lunar Prospector probe was scheduled to blast off from Cape Canaveral today at 5:31 p.m. PST and to establish an orbit around the moon by the end of the week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1989 | BEN SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
Sky gazers in Southern California and much of the rest of the planet will witness a total lunar eclipse tonight, weather permitting, as the moon orbits opposite the sun and makes a rare pass through Earth's shadow. Beginning at 6:21 p.m. PDT, the rising full moon will travel into the outer region of this shadow, called the penumbra, and to viewers in the eastern United States and much of the world it will appear that the normally white lunar surface gradually changes to orange or red.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1985
A nationwide survey disclosed that nearly two out of five photocopies made in American offices are wasted, unnecessary or for personal use. The study, sponsored by Accountemps, a firm that supplies temporary office personnel, estimated that about 130 billion of the 350 billion copies that will be made this year are not needed, at a cost of about $2.6 billion, not counting the time spent standing by the copier.
BOOKS
July 31, 1994
I must question your choice of reviewer for the three Apollo 25th Anniversary books ("How High the Sky," July 3). Terry Bisson makes it clear in the first paragraph that his politics are somewhere to the left of Alexander Cockburn, and the piece is sprinkled with asides that are not that relevant to the job at hand. The people most likely to be interested in moon landings 25 years later are "techies" rather than radical leftists. That said, the review does give a good picture of the books, but the political blather was distracting and annoying.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994
In his review of "Moon Over Madness" (" 'Moon' Aims High, but It's Not Quite a Cirque Thing," June 20), Don Shirley neglected to tell readers that the show received a standing ovation. What does that tell you? The show is fun, funny, full of surprises, full of heart and wonderful to look at. This could be the beginning of something marvelous for our city. This is a show created by and for Angelenos. It is clowns, dancers, mimes, musicians, puppeteers, jugglers and gymnasts creating something new. It is uniquely Angeleno in its vision and sensibilities.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|