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SCIENCE
September 23, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
How old is the moon? Not as old as we once thought. The moon is likely to be 4.4 billion to 4.45 billion years old, or about 100 million years younger than previously thought, according to new research by geochemist Richard Carlson of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. It may be the closest body to us in space, but scientists are still not sure exactly how, or when, it formed. PHOTOS: Mysterious moons of the solar system The current working theory suggests that the moon formed when a large proto-planet plowed into the early Earth, creating a major explosion that sent huge amounts of rocky debris into space.
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SCIENCE
May 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
When asteroid 1998 QE2 makes its closest approach to Earth on Friday, it will not be traveling alone: The massive space rock is hurtling through space accompanied by its own moon. It is not unheard of for an asteroid to have a moon, or satellite, accompanying it on its journey, but it is rare. Just 16% of asteroids that are 655 feet across or larger are part of a binary or triple system,  according to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Asteroid 1998 QE2's moon was revealed when NASA scientists were finally able to get a closer look at the incoming asteroid using the 230-foot Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan's space agency announced Thursday that it plans to send its first probe around the moon in August. The $269-million Selene, or Selenological and Engineering Explorer, will be carried into space by a Japanese-built H-2A rocket, the agency said. During its one-year mission, the probe is to release two small satellites to measure the moon's magnetic and gravitational fields. Selene will be launched from the remote southern island of Tanegashima.
SPORTS
October 27, 2007
Who would've thought that Major League Baseball would return to the Coliseum before the NFL did? Dan Rendant Arcadia
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
NASA made final preparations Sunday for the launch of a low-cost, water-seeking robot probe to the moon, its first mission to Earth's closest celestial neighbor in 25 years. The Lunar Prospector probe was scheduled to blast off from Cape Canaveral today at 5:31 p.m. PST and to establish an orbit around the moon by the end of the week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1989 | BEN SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
Sky gazers in Southern California and much of the rest of the planet will witness a total lunar eclipse tonight, weather permitting, as the moon orbits opposite the sun and makes a rare pass through Earth's shadow. Beginning at 6:21 p.m. PDT, the rising full moon will travel into the outer region of this shadow, called the penumbra, and to viewers in the eastern United States and much of the world it will appear that the normally white lunar surface gradually changes to orange or red.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1985
A nationwide survey disclosed that nearly two out of five photocopies made in American offices are wasted, unnecessary or for personal use. The study, sponsored by Accountemps, a firm that supplies temporary office personnel, estimated that about 130 billion of the 350 billion copies that will be made this year are not needed, at a cost of about $2.6 billion, not counting the time spent standing by the copier.
BOOKS
July 31, 1994
I must question your choice of reviewer for the three Apollo 25th Anniversary books ("How High the Sky," July 3). Terry Bisson makes it clear in the first paragraph that his politics are somewhere to the left of Alexander Cockburn, and the piece is sprinkled with asides that are not that relevant to the job at hand. The people most likely to be interested in moon landings 25 years later are "techies" rather than radical leftists. That said, the review does give a good picture of the books, but the political blather was distracting and annoying.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994
In his review of "Moon Over Madness" (" 'Moon' Aims High, but It's Not Quite a Cirque Thing," June 20), Don Shirley neglected to tell readers that the show received a standing ovation. What does that tell you? The show is fun, funny, full of surprises, full of heart and wonderful to look at. This could be the beginning of something marvelous for our city. This is a show created by and for Angelenos. It is clowns, dancers, mimes, musicians, puppeteers, jugglers and gymnasts creating something new. It is uniquely Angeleno in its vision and sensibilities.
OPINION
September 22, 2005
Re "Back to Moon via 'Apollo on Steroids,' " Sept. 20 At a time when more than $200 billion seems to be required to help the people in and around New Orleans, NASA has the audacity to announce that it plans to spend $104 billion to send yet another toy out into space. This project and many others by NASA serve no practical purpose for the general public, even though the American taxpayers have to foot the bill. ALBERT JAKOBSEN Arcadia As a recently retired aerospace engineer, I am annoyed at the prospect of spending $104 billion to retrace our steps to the moon.
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