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NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - President Obama urged graduates of a celebrated historically black college Sunday to use their education to help others and to work for "something larger than yourself," citing the example of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. In the commencement address at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Obama urged graduates headed to law school to make sure they "defend the powerless" during their careers. He said new physicians should find ways to "heal folks in under-served communities," and business school graduates should consider "putting people to work, or transforming a neighborhood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 29, 2013
Re "Obama's no-excuses credo," Opinion, May 26 Let's change the race dialogue from a discussion about victims - similar to David A. Lehrer's and Richard J. Riordan's Op-Ed article - to a discussion about perpetrators. Throughout the history of our country, white men have perpetrated continued injury and insult upon blacks, first through slavery, then through Jim Crow laws, now through the so-called war on drugs and the prison-industrial complex. Ignoring these episodes, Lehrer and Riordan fall back on the classic "bootstraps" advice to black people.
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NATIONAL
June 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A collection of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s handwritten documents and books won't be sold at auction and instead will be given to his alma mater. A coalition of business, individuals and philanthropic leaders led by Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin bought the collection for an undisclosed amount, said Morehouse College President Walter Massey.
OPINION
May 26, 2013 | By David A. Lehrer and Richard J. Riordan
On May 19, President Obama gave a commencement address at Morehouse College , a predominantly black men's college in Atlanta. His words and message were forceful, timely and uniquely befitting the first African American president. The president said what few others could say and still be considered politically acceptable. He debunked the notions of victimization and impotence so pervasive in talk about race, religion and ethnicity today, and encouraged the young black grads to "strive to do what's right … [to]
NATIONAL
November 22, 2011 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
At a packed political forum at Morehouse College — Atlanta's storied and historically black school for men — a moderator posed a question that cut to the sensitive heart of things on a campus that has produced Martin Luther King Jr. (Class of '48) and current GOP darling Herman Cain (Class of '67). The question: "Does Cain represent the modern Renaissance man of Morehouse?" A charged murmur rippled through a crowd of about 100 undergraduates. Traditional African American notions of social justice are part of the very DNA of Morehouse, founded in 1867 to educate recently freed slaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2004 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Ray Charles must have been singing in his grave as friend after friend paid a heart-pounding tribute during a glitzy Beverly Hills fundraiser for historically black Morehouse College.
OPINION
May 21, 2013 | By Walter M. Kimbrough
I was in Detroit preparing to give a speech last week when the news came across my Twitter feed: "Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine donate $70 million to USC to create new degree. " As one of the first university presidents from the hip-hop generation, I had to stop and read the story immediately. The two music moguls and co-founders of Beats Electronics - recognizing that they needed a new type of creative talent for their growing music technology business - are funding a four-year program that blends liberal arts, graphic and product design, business and technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Television talk show host Oprah Winfrey donated $1 million to Morehouse College to establish the Oprah Winfrey Endowed Scholarship Fund. "I have traveled around the country and witnessed the education crisis our young African-American men face," Winfrey said at Morehouse's 105th commencement Sunday. "Today marks the beginning in my personal efforts to halt that crisis."
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | United Press International
About 60 wheelchair-bound protesters occupied the Morehouse College president's office Monday, demanding that college officials help arrange a meeting with Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan. The group, American Disabled for Attendant Programs Today, wants Sullivan, a former school official, to redirect 25% of Medicaid's $17.5-billion nursing home budget to programs that would provide home care for the disabled.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | From Associated Press
The midnight-blue tour bus that carried music legend Ray Charles around the country has begun a new career at Morehouse College in Atlanta. The bus, donated to the college by the Ray Charles Foundation, will be on display outside the college's arts center and may be used for trips by student groups. Emblazoned with Charles' likeness, the vehicle is equipped with 35 customized seats, four televisions and a kitchen.
OPINION
May 21, 2013 | By Walter M. Kimbrough
I was in Detroit preparing to give a speech last week when the news came across my Twitter feed: "Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine donate $70 million to USC to create new degree. " As one of the first university presidents from the hip-hop generation, I had to stop and read the story immediately. The two music moguls and co-founders of Beats Electronics - recognizing that they needed a new type of creative talent for their growing music technology business - are funding a four-year program that blends liberal arts, graphic and product design, business and technology.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - President Obama urged graduates of a celebrated historically black college Sunday to use their education to help others and to work for "something larger than yourself," citing the example of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. In the commencement address at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Obama urged graduates headed to law school to make sure they "defend the powerless" during their careers. He said new physicians should find ways to "heal folks in under-served communities," and business school graduates should consider "putting people to work, or transforming a neighborhood.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2011 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
At a packed political forum at Morehouse College — Atlanta's storied and historically black school for men — a moderator posed a question that cut to the sensitive heart of things on a campus that has produced Martin Luther King Jr. (Class of '48) and current GOP darling Herman Cain (Class of '67). The question: "Does Cain represent the modern Renaissance man of Morehouse?" A charged murmur rippled through a crowd of about 100 undergraduates. Traditional African American notions of social justice are part of the very DNA of Morehouse, founded in 1867 to educate recently freed slaves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Halfway through rehearsal, the basses got an earful. "Your start is too aggressive! Like boom, boom, flap, flap, upside the head," conductor David Morrow shouted Sunday from a dark spot offstage in Club Nokia at L.A. Live. "It's not about the volume, it's about the quality. " And with that, the Morehouse College Glee Club ? the world-renowned, historically black, all-male choir that has sung at the Olympics, the Super Bowl and the funeral of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. ?
NATIONAL
May 22, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Michael Brewer, a senior at Morehouse College, was strolling purposefully around this storied campus on a hot spring day, his heavy frame dripping sweat, his hands clutching a small stack of fliers. "No more hate," the fliers read, in a stylish typeface. "No more discrimination. No more." "What's up, brother?" Brewer said in a lilting, cheerful voice as he approached a fellow student in a dark business suit. "Take one of these, if you will." The young man gave the flier a glance.
NEWS
May 6, 2007 | Errin Haines, Associated Press
Walter Massey was a shy black boy from Hattiesburg, Miss., unsure of his place in the world, when he arrived as a 16-year-old freshman at Morehouse College. Nearly 40 years later, he returned to change the school that changed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989
In an effort to increase the number of blacks entering science and engineering fields, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Caltech signed agreements Tuesday for a joint academic program with seven historically black colleges and universities in the South. "The black colleges and universities have a great resource we have not been tapping," said Martin Leipold, manager of the program for JPL. He said the Pasadena area lab will offer summer research jobs to the students, and JPL scientists and Caltech professors will lecture at the schools.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Michael Brewer, a senior at Morehouse College, was strolling purposefully around this storied campus on a hot spring day, his heavy frame dripping sweat, his hands clutching a small stack of fliers. "No more hate," the fliers read, in a stylish typeface. "No more discrimination. No more." "What's up, brother?" Brewer said in a lilting, cheerful voice as he approached a fellow student in a dark business suit. "Take one of these, if you will." The young man gave the flier a glance.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A collection of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s handwritten documents and books won't be sold at auction and instead will be given to his alma mater. A coalition of business, individuals and philanthropic leaders led by Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin bought the collection for an undisclosed amount, said Morehouse College President Walter Massey.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | From Associated Press
The midnight-blue tour bus that carried music legend Ray Charles around the country has begun a new career at Morehouse College in Atlanta. The bus, donated to the college by the Ray Charles Foundation, will be on display outside the college's arts center and may be used for trips by student groups. Emblazoned with Charles' likeness, the vehicle is equipped with 35 customized seats, four televisions and a kitchen.
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