Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMorley Safer
IN THE NEWS

Morley Safer

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1993 | LEE MARGULIES
Americans can't seem to get enough of network newsmagazines these days. Of the eight that were broadcast last week, four ranked among the five highest-rated programs on television, and three others finished among the Top 16. Topping the A.C. Nielsen Co. list released Tuesday was a repeat of "60 Minutes," whose reports by correspondents Mike Wallace, Morley Safer and Steve Kroft were seen in about 14.3 million homes. ABC's "20/20," with Hugh Downs and Barbara Walters, was a close second.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joe Raposo died in January, 1989, at 52, he left behind a worldwide legacy. Raposo wrote songs, thousands of them; you know his music, even if you don't know his name. Raposo, an award-winning composer for film, television and Broadway, wrote songs for Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles and Lena Horne, among others. But he was also the musical heartbeat of "Sesame Street." Tonight's "Sing! Sesame Street Remembers the Music of Joe Raposo" (8 p.m.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1996 | From Reuters
CBS Inc. told a judge Thursday that Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. does not need the confidential information it is trying to force from "60 Minutes" journalists about the tobacco company's former research chief turned whistle-blower. The network is seeking a ruling that would throw out subpoenas issued to television news show veterans Mike Wallace and Morley Safer and others about a controversial interview with former B&W executive Jeffrey Wigand. Louisville, Ky.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Forget cocaine--guns have clearly become the premier American drug of choice. And it's hitting the TV airwaves in a big way this weekend. Whether it's the deadly serious "60 Minutes" segment, "Bang, Bang, You're Dead" (at 7 p.m. Sunday on CBS), or the ironic and mordant "Guns and Violence" episode of the delicious series "The 90's" (at 10 tonight on KCET Channel 28), the message is clear: Like any full-time user, Americans are paying a heavy price for their firearms habit.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2002 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
Someday, the Hollywood power brokers who reign over TV programming will wake up to discover that the cult of celebrity is over, and that the public has finally had its fill of the endless profiles of the rich and famous that have been clogging the airwaves since the medium was in its infancy.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | From Associated Press
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. received permission Monday to seek sworn depositions from "60 Minutes" correspondent Mike Wallace and other CBS employees who interviewed whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand. Lawyers for the Louisville, Ky.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
CBS News correspondents Meredith Vieira and Steve Kroft will leave the low-rated "West 57th" magazine series for its high-rated older brother, "60 Minutes," the network said Thursday. The shift comes three months after Diane Sawyer made her well-publicized jump from "60 Minutes" to ABC News to co-anchor a new prime-time series, and less than two months after Connie Chung left NBC to anchor what will be a revamped version of "West 57th" next fall. Vieira, 35, has been with "West 57th" since it premiered in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | David Bauder, Associated Press
CBS News won a Peabody Award on Thursday for its report on abuse at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, a story anchored by Dan Rather and produced by Mary Mapes, who was later fired by CBS for her role in the story about President Bush's military service. Comedy Central's Jon Stewart won his second Peabody Award, for his satiric take on the 2004 election campaign, while HBO's Western "Deadwood" also won.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|