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Mormon

ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By David Ng
Tickets for "The Book of Mormon" at the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood will go on sale to the general public starting June 10, the show's producers announced Wednesday. A daily lottery for discount tickets will also be held during the show's L.A. run. Producers of "Mormon" said that tickets for the L.A. engagement will go on sale at 7 a.m. on June 10 at the Pantages box office. Tickets will be available for purchase via Ticketmaster starting the same day at noon, online and by phone at (800)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By David Ng
Over the years, "The Simpsons"on Fox has engaged a few Broadway talents in guest spots -- Stephen Sondheim, David Mamet and Mandy Patinkin all have put it vocal cameos. The series even paid tribute to Bob Fosse in a few episodes, with an obnoxious choreographer character named Chazz Busby. The latest Broadway talent to visit Springfield will be Robert Lopez, a co-writer of "The Book of Mormon," according to a report in Playbill. Lopez apparently has penned a new song that will be performed on the April 29 episode, titled "A Totally Fun Thing Bart Will Never Do Again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
Gavin Creel and Jared Gertner, now starring as the lead missionaries in the Los Angeles production of “The Book of Mormon,” will get to hear British laughter come Feb. 25, when the show opens in London's West End. The Daily Mail reported Thursday that the producers changed their mind about hiring an all-British cast and opted for the two Americans in the lead roles of Elder Price and Elder Cunningham. Sonia Friedman, co-producer in London, said “it became clear early on during the audition process in London that we needed the real thing.” She noted that Creel's role, Elder Price, requires that “sort of square-jawed Mormon, and you can't create that all-American look.” One shudders for the British thespian community if that kind of thinking really takes hold.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2011 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Monday The Tony Awards honor "The Book of Mormon" and "War Horse" as the big winners at Sunday's ceremony, hosted by Neil Patrick Harris. ( Los Angeles Times ) Clarence Clemons, Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band saxophonist, suffers a stroke at 69. ( AP ) Laura Ziskin, producer of the "Spider-Man" films, died of breast cancer Sunday at age 61. ( Los Angeles Times ) First Lady Michelle Obama lands in the City of Angels to discuss with SAG members and the AFTRA how Hollywood could tell stories about military families.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2011
The reboot of the "Spider-Man" musical hasn't been hurt by opening-night reviews. The show, which finally welcomed professional drama critics, grossed more than $1 million last week and even beat the popular musical "The Book of Mormon. " The reviews acknowledged improvement over the earlier version but were still poor. "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark" opened Tuesday. It pulled in nearly $1.28 million for the week ending Sunday. That makes it the third-highest-grossing show on Broadway after "Wicked" and "The Lion King.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
After winning nine Tony Awards Sunday night, including the one for best musical, "The Book of Mormon" got more good news Wednesday: Its cast album ranked No. 3 on the U.S. sales charts last week. It was the highest-charting Broadway cast album — and first top 10 — since 1969, when "Hair" spent 13 weeks at No. 1, Billboard reported. The Broadway album sold 61,000 units during the week that ended Sunday — a paltry figure compared, say, with the more than 1.1. million that Lady Gaga's "Born This Way" sold two weeks ago, but Billboard said it marked the largest sales week for any cast album since Nielsen SoundScan began tracking data in 1991, the previous record having been 54,000 for "Phantom of the Opera" in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2011 | Reed Johnson
"The Book of Mormon," the exuberantly foul-mouthed hit show about comically mismatched missionaries in AIDS-ravaged Africa, won the award for best musical, along with eight other awards, and Nick Stafford's "War Horse," starring a life-size puppet of a noble steed, won five awards capped by the best play trophy at Sunday's Tony Awards ceremony in New York. As was widely predicted, Sutton Foster won as actress in a musical award for Cole Porter's "Anything Goes," the best musical revival winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By David Ng
For someone who made his name with ribald musical comedies like "The Book of Mormon" and "Avenue Q," Robert Lopez would have seemed like the last choice on Earth to write the songs for a Disney animated movie. But his work on "Frozen" has been a popular success, earning him his first Academy Award nomination for the song "Let It Go," which he co-wrote with his wife, Kristen Anderson-Lopez. If they win, Lopez will be able to add the Oscar to the Tony Awards he received in 2011 for co-writing "Mormon" (with "South Park" creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker)
NATIONAL
November 30, 2002 | From Associated Press
A graduate student with Mormon family roots says he probably will be excommunicated next week for articles he has written questioning the validity of the Book of Mormon. Thomas W. Murphy, 35, published an article in the May Signature Books anthology, "American Apocrypha," which uses genetic data to discredit the Book of Mormon claim that American Indians are heathen descendants of ancient Israel. The conclusion also is the thesis of his doctoral dissertation at the University of Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2012 | By Patrick Pacheco
NEW YORK - In "The Book of Mormon," a group of teenage American missionaries sent to evangelize Ugandans beset by war, poverty, AIDS and drought is getting nowhere until one of its number - the hapless Elder Cunningham - begins to mix the writings of the prophet Joseph Smith with whoppers of pop culture phenomena, including Disney, "Star Wars" and "The Lord of the Rings. " The cooked-up messianic message is like the musical itself: a sweet-profane amalgam of scatological mockery and affectionate satire which, since it opened last year, has been drawing converts of its own along with rave reviews, record-breaking box office, and a slew of top awards, including a best musical Tony Award.
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