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Morris Dees

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MAGAZINE
January 21, 1990
The thing that has always baffled me about white supremacists is their frame of reference. A moment of self-examination should convince them that their own heredity didn't guarantee any kind of racial superiority. In fact, a gathering of these fools might be convincing evidence that the white race is supremely defective. TOM W. DAY, Huntington Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2005 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Five months after a Corona high school student was killed in a racially motivated attack off campus, a civil rights legend came to Riverside County on Wednesday and told thousands of Corona and Norco educators that they had a pivotal role in teaching children about tolerance. Morris Dees, co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center and a renowned civil rights attorney, told the teachers that the "keys to the gates of opportunity and justice" were in their hands.
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NEWS
May 22, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Antichrist Jew!" taunted the man wearing the robes of the Ku Klux Klan and an ivory-handled revolver in his belt. He stood accused of terrorizing the Vietnamese fishermen of Galveston Bay, and he confronted his accuser with an ominous taunt: "You die, you die, you die." But attorney Morris Dees, known to his friends as "Bubba," was undaunted. "I didn't need a revolver to fight this battle," he writes in "A Time for Justice." "I'd use the law."
BOOKS
April 7, 1996 | Charles Bowden, Charles Bowden's most recent book is "Blood Orchid: An Unnatural History of America" (Random House)
This silence is not golden. Old bouquets of flowers hang from cyclone fence encircling the vacant lot. Nearby, a battered building stands empty with a concrete skin that looks pitted by hostile fire. A long yellow banner hangs, requesting "STRENGTH, COMPASSION, LOVE, UNITED!" Until the morning of April 19, 1995, the federal building stood here in Oklahoma. Now the ruins have been bulldozed flat and tourists come with video cameras and look. No one speaks, not a single word. No one seems to know what to say. In 1983, they burned his office.
MAGAZINE
December 3, 1989 | RICHARD E. MEYER, R ichard E. Meyer is a Times staff writer.
WHEN MORRIS DEES was 4, his daddy gave him his only whipping. He used a belt, and he whipped him all over the barnyard. It was for speaking with disrespect to a black man. It made an impression, but nothing like the impression his daddy left a few years later, when Morris Dees was old enough to tote water. It was summer in Alabama, mercilessly hot. He carried the water in a bucket out to his daddy's workers, hoeing cotton in the fields. One of them was Perry Lee. She was black.
BOOKS
March 14, 1993 | Ramona Ripston, Ripston is the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California
"Hate On Trial" begins with the recounting of a particularly brutal hate crime in Portland, Ore.--the killing by skinheads of Mulugeta Seraw, a young Ethiopian student. Three members of the White Aryan Resistance movement, a well-financed white supremacist organization known popularly as WAR, were quickly arrested and after a few months pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter as well as to assault and intimidation.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Black and white. Usually, it means plain, explicit, uncomplicated. In his law office, where the white pages of statute books were blackened by a firebomb, Morris Dees somehow keeps seeing shades of gray. Dees, founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center and its chief counsel in trials that have destroyed Ku Klux Klan organizations, wants to understand his bitter adversaries--even the ones who have tried to kill him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2005 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Five months after a Corona high school student was killed in a racially motivated attack off campus, a civil rights legend came to Riverside County on Wednesday and told thousands of Corona and Norco educators that they had a pivotal role in teaching children about tolerance. Morris Dees, co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center and a renowned civil rights attorney, told the teachers that the "keys to the gates of opportunity and justice" were in their hands.
BOOKS
April 7, 1996 | Charles Bowden, Charles Bowden's most recent book is "Blood Orchid: An Unnatural History of America" (Random House)
This silence is not golden. Old bouquets of flowers hang from cyclone fence encircling the vacant lot. Nearby, a battered building stands empty with a concrete skin that looks pitted by hostile fire. A long yellow banner hangs, requesting "STRENGTH, COMPASSION, LOVE, UNITED!" Until the morning of April 19, 1995, the federal building stood here in Oklahoma. Now the ruins have been bulldozed flat and tourists come with video cameras and look. No one speaks, not a single word. No one seems to know what to say. In 1983, they burned his office.
BOOKS
March 14, 1993 | Ramona Ripston, Ripston is the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California
"Hate On Trial" begins with the recounting of a particularly brutal hate crime in Portland, Ore.--the killing by skinheads of Mulugeta Seraw, a young Ethiopian student. Three members of the White Aryan Resistance movement, a well-financed white supremacist organization known popularly as WAR, were quickly arrested and after a few months pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter as well as to assault and intimidation.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The hot pair of the evening may have been Warren Beatty and Norman Mailer, but the hot topic was the resignation earlier that day of liberal Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Appropriately, the Hollywood Women's Political Committee honored civil rights attorney Morris Dees with its Barbara Jordan Award Thursday evening at the Regent Beverly Wilshire. (Jordan congratulated him via video as did Julian Bond, Ethel Kennedy, George McGovern and Rosa Parks.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Antichrist Jew!" taunted the man wearing the robes of the Ku Klux Klan and an ivory-handled revolver in his belt. He stood accused of terrorizing the Vietnamese fishermen of Galveston Bay, and he confronted his accuser with an ominous taunt: "You die, you die, you die." But attorney Morris Dees, known to his friends as "Bubba," was undaunted. "I didn't need a revolver to fight this battle," he writes in "A Time for Justice." "I'd use the law."
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Black and white. Usually, it means plain, explicit, uncomplicated. In his law office, where the white pages of statute books were blackened by a firebomb, Morris Dees somehow keeps seeing shades of gray. Dees, founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center and its chief counsel in trials that have destroyed Ku Klux Klan organizations, wants to understand his bitter adversaries--even the ones who have tried to kill him.
NEWS
May 27, 1990
ATTORNEY TO SPEAK: Anti-Klan lawyer Morris Dees will deliver the commencement address at Whittier College's 87th commencement beginning at 5 p.m. today in the Harris Amphitheatre, 13406 E. Philadelphia St., Whittier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1990
As a minority, I am writing to express my outrage for the large, free picture publicity The Times afforded Tom Metzger, an individual whose activities and adult life are directed toward open bigotry and racism (Feb. 18). One may not throw the stone himself, however, when he encourages others to do so, then he bears the same guilt. My complaint is not with the article, but with the large, and certainly undeserved, free picture publicity. When Nelson Mandela was released from prison, The Times printed a smaller picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1990
One can only hope that the black community shares the opinion of the "several people who have worked closely with Public Enemy" and who evaluate Chuck D. as being in "over his head" as a social spokesman ("Rap--The Power and the Controversy," by Robert Hilburn). As Jewish children, my generation was constantly taught to work hard for racial equality, to fight racism and to support the black struggle. This is why, in 1966, we risked our necks weekly to travel by bus from Columbia University to 137th Street and Lenox Avenue in Harlem to tutor ghetto kids who needed help in school, and why we marched in the streets of Washington, D.C., and this is why Mickey Schwerner and Andrew Goodman, two Jewish boys from the North, sacrificed their young lives together with their black friend, James Chaney, as part of the never-ending struggle against a white redneck racist mentality in the Deep South at that time.
MAGAZINE
January 28, 1990
This letter to protest the racist overtones in "The Long Crusade," by Richard E. Meyer (Dec. 3). Although the article gives the initial impression that is informing readers about the man who bankrupted the Klan, it goes into detail about the circumstances of the lynching of a young black man in the South. The details were such as to relish every detail of the act. And then, the article dispenses information on Tom Metzger and his neo-Nazi skinhead son's hate campaigns. The pictures that accompanied the article were shot in such a manner as, in one case, to showcase racist epithets on the wall behind Metzger; in yet another picture, an upward view into the hateful faces of Metzger, his Nazi son and white attack dog were reminiscent of nothing less than Hitler.
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