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February 10, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
Moscow's $4-billion Crystal Island development won preliminary planning approval during the week between Christmas and New Year's Day, just as Russians were beginning to need a glittering distraction from short, bleak winter days. Eye-popping images of the hugely ambitious project, designed for a site on the Moscow River by the British architect Norman Foster, more than fit the bill.
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TRAVEL
February 1, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
MOSCOW - Once I came to Moscow to cover an urban ballooning expedition. In winter. But when the balloonists came face to frigid, wind-lashed face with the winter here - well, we never got off the ground. And so, as icy gales scoured the city, I strolled near the Moskva River until I faced a vast, low-hovering cloud, lighted from within, scented with chlorine and cigarettes. Occasionally, a near-naked Muscovite would emerge, dripping, and wander off to look for a towel and his pants.
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WORLD
June 24, 2007 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Deep underground in a Cold War-era nuclear bomb shelter, guide Alexei Alexandrov did his best to set a spooky mood, starting with his 1960s Soviet army uniform. "Please don't split away from the group," he somberly warned visitors to the labyrinth of tunnels shaped into cavernous rooms and lengthy hallways, "or you may get lost in the dark and end up shot by a guard by mistake."
WORLD
May 31, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
There were rock stars and rappers, and there were nurses to take blood donations. Music boomed off the sides of skyscrapers for blocks around. In between patriotism-tinged performances, earnest announcers climbed onto a stage in a square, under a sign that read "Saving Lives," and told hundreds of cheering youths about all the good things that would be done with the donated blood. Monday was Generation Day in Moscow, an event of vague origin, organized by networks of pro-Kremlin youth groups apparently to drown out another event.
WORLD
April 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of Muscovites turned out to scrub, paint or sweep Russia's capital in the annual subbotnik, or spring cleaning. The custom of giving up time one spring weekend to spruce up parks, streets and courtyards began in 1919. Like many aspects of Soviet life, it now has nostalgic appeal. This year's participants appeared to enjoy scrubbing Moscow, which is left covered with litter and mud when the snow melts after five months of fierce winter.
WORLD
October 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia and the United States have agreed on a new lease for the U.S. ambassador's lavish Moscow residence after Russia complained that he paid less than $3 a year for it, officials announced. The annual rent for Spaso House in central Moscow was set in rubles in 1985, but the currency's value plummeted 99.9% after the Soviet Union collapsed, making the rent nearly free, according to media reports. A U.S. Embassy spokesman declined to disclose the cost of the new 49-year lease.
WORLD
September 1, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A female suicide bomber wearing an explosive device stuffed with metal bolts killed at least nine people near a Moscow subway station Tuesday evening in a blast that also injured at least 51, authorities said. The woman was heading toward the station but two police officers were on duty at the entrance, Moscow Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov told reporters at the scene. "She was frightened, turned around and decided to destroy herself in the thick of a crowd," he said.
WORLD
December 6, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The death toll rose to at least 41 in a suicide bomb attack Friday on a commuter train near war-torn Chechnya. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin called the blast a futile effort to sow disorder on the eve of elections. "The crime committed today is undoubtedly an attempt to destabilize the situation" before Sunday's parliamentary balloting in Russia, Putin said in televised remarks made during a meeting with law enforcement officials. "I'm sure the criminals will not succeed."
WORLD
August 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian authorities have sealed off Moscow's Red Square at the height of the tourist season, apparently out of fear of bombings by Chechen rebels. A handwritten sign taped to a metal barrier leading into the square, which runs along one side of the Kremlin, said: "Red Square is closed until September." Police refused to say why, but the Izvestia daily said the closure was due to fears of attacks after two bomb attacks in the capital last month.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | Associated Press
Relentless in his campaign to beautify the Russian capital, Moscow's mayor has ordered clunkers off the streets. Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov told police to stop any car "in technical disrepair or with blemishes" and confiscate the license plates, the Itar-Tass news agency said Saturday. It said at least 120,000 clunkers cruise the busy streets of Moscow every day and quoted city officials as complaining that Muscovites are too stingy to spend money repairing their cars.
WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The suicide bombs that roared through Moscow subway cars Monday were almost certainly the latest salvo in a slow-moving war of attrition between the Russian government and militants in the restive, mostly Muslim republics of the Caucasus. Vladimir Putin has been trading blows with southern rebels ever since he rose to the presidency a decade ago. At times, violence has threatened to erode the social contract he's struck with the Russian public: Forgo some democratic rights in exchange for, above all, stability.
WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
Explosions tore through two subway stations at rush hour on Monday, killing at least 37 people and wounding others, authorities and news agencies said. The first blast came just before 8 a.m. at Lubyanka station, the Emergencies Ministry said. The headquarters of the Federal Security Service, successor to the Soviet-era KGB, is just above the station. "The blast hit the second carriage of a Metro train that stopped at Lubyanka" at 7:56 a.m., ministry spokeswoman Irina Andrianova said.
WORLD
October 14, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Further sanctions against Iran would be "counterproductive," Russia's top diplomat said today, pushing back pointedly against U.S. pressure for a tougher stance against Tehran's nuclear ambitions. The remarks from Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, delivered at the side of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, appeared to undercut hopes that Moscow might agree to additional steps that would isolate Iran. "We believe that at this stage all efforts must be focused on supporting the negotiating process," Lavrov said.
WORLD
May 17, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
The plainclothes security men came first, clustering in jeans, leather jackets and pointy black shoes. Then the policemen in gray uniforms and stiff hats; bulky men in dark suits who appeared to be in charge; a bus load of riot police in camouflage. A raw wind swept off the Moscow River on Saturday morning, past the souvenir peddlers with their tables of bright wooden matryoshka dolls and T-shirts emblazoned with Soviet iconography.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
Moscow's $4-billion Crystal Island development won preliminary planning approval during the week between Christmas and New Year's Day, just as Russians were beginning to need a glittering distraction from short, bleak winter days. Eye-popping images of the hugely ambitious project, designed for a site on the Moscow River by the British architect Norman Foster, more than fit the bill.
WORLD
July 31, 2007 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
For centuries, Red Square and the Kremlin have been the heart of Moscow. But a 21st century downtown is rising, with skyscrapers set to reshape the image of Europe's largest city. The $10-billion "Moskva-City" complex of offices, hotels, apartments, restaurants, shops and entertainment centers will have about 25 high-rises, including at least seven buildings taller than any others now existing in Europe.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
A survey of Muscovites found: 26% rate President Clinton a better leader than Boris N. Yeltsin. 61% said the Clinton-Yeltsin summit would be important. 32% said they believed Alaska, bought from Russia in 1867 for $7.2 million, should belong to Russia. 74% said the southern Kuril Islands, seized from Japan by the Soviet Union after World War II, should remain Russian territory. Source: Telephone poll of 1,050 Muscovites, conducted Jan. 4-6 by the polling group Mnenie.
NEWS
March 9, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's a man-bites-dog story from Moscow--people are lining up to sell things, not just to buy them. "Pal, come and look at my cassette player," beckons a man in a ski cap who three months ago was still chauffeuring Soviet government bigwigs around in a black sedan. Now, the unemployed driver and hundreds of other small-time merchants have come together in this city's heart to create what could be termed a no-frills, rock-bottom-budget shopping mall.
WORLD
June 24, 2007 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Deep underground in a Cold War-era nuclear bomb shelter, guide Alexei Alexandrov did his best to set a spooky mood, starting with his 1960s Soviet army uniform. "Please don't split away from the group," he somberly warned visitors to the labyrinth of tunnels shaped into cavernous rooms and lengthy hallways, "or you may get lost in the dark and end up shot by a guard by mistake."
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