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NEWS
December 13, 1994
Vice President Al Gore and a high-level American delegation including Defense Secretary William J. Perry will arrive in Moscow on Wednesday for the fourth round of talks on fostering U.S.-Russian cooperation. The Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, chaired by Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, was formed in April, 1993, to develop deeper economic, trade, scientific and technical ties between the two countries. Gore is also scheduled to meet Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
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NEWS
March 28, 1995
Defense Secretary William J. Perry arrives in Moscow Saturday for meetings with senior government and military officials on topics ranging from defense conversion to nuclear-arms dismantlement. The secretary, making his second trip to the region, will also visit the former Soviet republics of Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. In Moscow, Perry will meet with Russian Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | VIKTOR K. GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice of Russian peasantry, historically so feeble, echoed again Tuesday in downtown Moscow as people from Central Russia's farming areas protested the government's agricultural policy or--as they put it--lack of one. Standing stoically in the rare September sunshine, the 1,500 protesters held up signs bearing slogans such as "Unhappy Peasant--Unhappy Country" and "We Are Losing Faith in Our Government."
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a three-day visit to Moscow aimed at soothing irritated relations between the United States and Russia, Vice President Al Gore said Friday that the threat of a "cold peace" was only rhetorical. "My impression is that there is no cold peace but instead a warm relationship that is very much on track," Gore said after a 30-minute meeting with President Boris N. Yeltsin at the hospital where Yeltsin is recovering from minor nose surgery.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greenpeace activists handcuffed themselves to the door of the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry and blocked its main entrance Wednesday as part of their mounting campaign to fight government plans for 26 new nuclear plants across Russia. The protest lasted only two hours and ended peacefully when police managed to unlock the handcuffs and remove the padlocked bar across the ministry's front door.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American exchange student from Brown University has been found dead outside his Moscow dormitory, and although police insist that the death was a suicide, the coroner's report calls it murder. News reports quoting unnamed faculty members and other sources at the Russian State University for the Humanities suggest that the death of Anthony Riccio, 21, may have been the work of local gangsters who had been renting out space from a university that has a reputation for financial improprieties.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riot police clashed with several hundred enraged demonstrators Tuesday night as an angry crowd, shouting "Death to Yeltsin" and "Fascism will not prevail," tried to shove through a phalanx of troops to reach the besieged Russian Parliament building. Witnesses said at least two people were seriously injured in the ensuing melee.
WORLD
May 31, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
There were rock stars and rappers, and there were nurses to take blood donations. Music boomed off the sides of skyscrapers for blocks around. In between patriotism-tinged performances, earnest announcers climbed onto a stage in a square, under a sign that read "Saving Lives," and told hundreds of cheering youths about all the good things that would be done with the donated blood. Monday was Generation Day in Moscow, an event of vague origin, organized by networks of pro-Kremlin youth groups apparently to drown out another event.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American businessman held hostage for 10 days by 16 armed kidnapers from southern Russia was freed two blocks from the Kremlin and his abductors were arrested by police after an investigation aided by the FBI, authorities said Wednesday. The kidnapers had demanded a $400,000 ransom for Thomas Ling Ming Cha, 58, head of Alaska Antler Products Inc. in Anchorage, Cha's assistant, Susan Mitchell, said in a telephone interview from Alaska.
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