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WORLD
October 14, 2003 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Zurab Tsereteli, the court sculptor whose work decorates the capital, is used to being derided by critics and rivals as the king of kitsch. At 69, he sails on a sea of controversy, his ego billowing like a wind-filled spinnaker that no criticism can deflate. Though his work often raises hackles on his home turf, it is his latest project that is roiling the waves in two countries. Tsereteli's memorial to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S.
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WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The suicide bombs that roared through Moscow subway cars Monday were almost certainly the latest salvo in a slow-moving war of attrition between the Russian government and militants in the restive, mostly Muslim republics of the Caucasus. Vladimir Putin has been trading blows with southern rebels ever since he rose to the presidency a decade ago. At times, violence has threatened to erode the social contract he's struck with the Russian public: Forgo some democratic rights in exchange for, above all, stability.
NEWS
August 18, 1992
As they did last August, soldiers will be marching in Moscow's streets this week--but this time, it will be part of a celebration, not an attempted coup. Wednesday marks the anniversary of last year's abortive effort by top-level Communist leaders to turn the clock back on reforms--an effort that ironically led to the total collapse of the old Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 28, 1995
Defense Secretary William J. Perry arrives in Moscow Saturday for meetings with senior government and military officials on topics ranging from defense conversion to nuclear-arms dismantlement. The secretary, making his second trip to the region, will also visit the former Soviet republics of Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. In Moscow, Perry will meet with Russian Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | VIKTOR K. GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice of Russian peasantry, historically so feeble, echoed again Tuesday in downtown Moscow as people from Central Russia's farming areas protested the government's agricultural policy or--as they put it--lack of one. Standing stoically in the rare September sunshine, the 1,500 protesters held up signs bearing slogans such as "Unhappy Peasant--Unhappy Country" and "We Are Losing Faith in Our Government."
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a three-day visit to Moscow aimed at soothing irritated relations between the United States and Russia, Vice President Al Gore said Friday that the threat of a "cold peace" was only rhetorical. "My impression is that there is no cold peace but instead a warm relationship that is very much on track," Gore said after a 30-minute meeting with President Boris N. Yeltsin at the hospital where Yeltsin is recovering from minor nose surgery.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greenpeace activists handcuffed themselves to the door of the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry and blocked its main entrance Wednesday as part of their mounting campaign to fight government plans for 26 new nuclear plants across Russia. The protest lasted only two hours and ended peacefully when police managed to unlock the handcuffs and remove the padlocked bar across the ministry's front door.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American exchange student from Brown University has been found dead outside his Moscow dormitory, and although police insist that the death was a suicide, the coroner's report calls it murder. News reports quoting unnamed faculty members and other sources at the Russian State University for the Humanities suggest that the death of Anthony Riccio, 21, may have been the work of local gangsters who had been renting out space from a university that has a reputation for financial improprieties.
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