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WORLD
March 17, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Police said Tuesday that they were searching for two homeless men who might have stolen gas valves from an apartment building in northern Russia, leading to a huge predawn explosion that left at least 32 people dead. But a municipal official said the utility lines in Arkhangelsk, 600 miles north of Moscow, were so poorly maintained that simple deterioration could have caused the tragedy. At least 11 residents remained unaccounted for, and 24 others were injured, seven critically.
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NEWS
October 5, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A statue 300 feet high is rising out of the murky Moscow River, a monument to grandiose political ambition both past and present. The towering bronze figure being welded together on an artificial island in mid-river, within sight of the Kremlin, is that of Russia's all-conquering Czar Peter the Great. He dragged a reluctant Russia into modern Europe 300 years ago, giving it its first sea access and fleet.
WORLD
July 8, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coal dust deep in a Ukrainian mine ignited Sunday, starting a fire that killed at least 33 miners--the worst accident so far this year in the former Soviet republic's troubled coal industry. Thirty of the miners were in a trolley that was descending into the Ukraina mine in the town of Ukrainsk at 2:30 a.m. when the fire broke out, said Col. Oleksey Pechenkin, spokesman for Ukraine's Emergencies Ministry.
WORLD
May 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Police detained gay-rights activists here Sunday, among them European lawmakers, as counterdemonstrators hurled fists, eggs and insults. The melee broke out as the activists tried to present a letter to Moscow's mayor appealing the city's ban on a march to mark the 14th anniversary of Russia's decriminalization of homosexuality. The march would have been held Sunday.
WORLD
August 22, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A bomb blast in a sprawling Moscow market killed 10 people and wounded about 50 on Monday in what authorities said was possibly a racist attack targeting the primarily non-Russian traders at the site. Workers and customers at the Cherkizovsky market captured two young men accused of being the bombers, roughed them up and turned them over to police, witnesses said. Most traders at the 50-acre market are from Russia's Caucasus republics, the former Soviet states of Central Asia, Vietnam or China.
WORLD
September 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
Police stopped a man driving a car wired with land mines and explosives in downtown Moscow early Saturday, Russian security officials said. The man, detained about 1 a.m., told police he had been paid $1,000 to park two cars loaded with explosives along a Moscow street frequently used by top government officials, the duty officer at the Federal Security Service said. The officer said the man later suffered a heart attack and died while in police custody, but he refused to elaborate.
WORLD
March 7, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
They emerge onto major thoroughfares a bit before midnight, their crab claws gobbling up snow piles in huge pincer movements as attendant dump trucks trail obediently behind. These humble but hefty snow loaders, virtually unchanged from models used four decades ago, play a key role in an ongoing cold war: the Russian capital's annual industrial-scale battle to remove snow from the streets before the next storm sets in.
WORLD
December 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
A fire broke out in a women's ward of a drug treatment hospital early Saturday, with heavy smoke killing 42 people, some while they slept and others whose attempts to flee were thwarted by metal grilles blocking escape routes, authorities said. Russia's chief fire inspector, Yuri Nenashev, said he was "90% certain" the fire was caused by arson. But Moscow city prosecutor Yuri Syomin said investigators were looking into other possibilities.
WORLD
October 14, 2003 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Zurab Tsereteli, the court sculptor whose work decorates the capital, is used to being derided by critics and rivals as the king of kitsch. At 69, he sails on a sea of controversy, his ego billowing like a wind-filled spinnaker that no criticism can deflate. Though his work often raises hackles on his home turf, it is his latest project that is roiling the waves in two countries. Tsereteli's memorial to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S.
WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The suicide bombs that roared through Moscow subway cars Monday were almost certainly the latest salvo in a slow-moving war of attrition between the Russian government and militants in the restive, mostly Muslim republics of the Caucasus. Vladimir Putin has been trading blows with southern rebels ever since he rose to the presidency a decade ago. At times, violence has threatened to erode the social contract he's struck with the Russian public: Forgo some democratic rights in exchange for, above all, stability.
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