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WORLD
October 14, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Further sanctions against Iran would be "counterproductive," Russia's top diplomat said today, pushing back pointedly against U.S. pressure for a tougher stance against Tehran's nuclear ambitions. The remarks from Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, delivered at the side of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, appeared to undercut hopes that Moscow might agree to additional steps that would isolate Iran. "We believe that at this stage all efforts must be focused on supporting the negotiating process," Lavrov said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | ALEXANDER YANOV, Alexander Yanov is the author of "The Russian Challenge and the Year 2000" and "The Russian New Right."
It's hardly surprising that Western media keep missing important--and troubling--political trends in Moscow; it just reflects our total preoccupation with Russia's financial meltdown. Such predominance of economics might have been excused in the heady years of President Boris N. Yeltsin's power. The trouble is that not just Yeltsin but an entire era is fading from the picture. A new and dangerous one looms on the horizon while we refuse to see its omens.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cold, the wind and the snow suited Marina Matkovskaya in a way. So did the taunts of passersby and even the open abuse of an old man who shouted "Fascists, fascists!" as she unfurled the red flag of the old Soviet Union. "We are in the wilderness," Matkovskaya, 54, a chemical engineer, said. "It's almost right that we should suffer, I suppose, because, quite frankly, we made a mess of it. That our successors are doing far, far worse, however, is no comfort."
NEWS
March 29, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic instance of the anti-American sentiment sweeping Russia because of NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia, a man fired a submachine gun Sunday at the U.S. Embassy here, raking its walls with bullets. The yolk-colored exterior of the embassy, now spattered in many bright hues, is showing the effects of four days of protests--probably the most heated ever seen there--by demonstrators who have hurled paint, rocks, beer and eggs, burned American flags, broken windows and urinated.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Nixon, the former American President, wound up an 11-day "fact-finding" mission to Moscow on Tuesday by hearing out Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, the Russian master of hyperbole. In 80 minutes, Nixon got an earful. Among the dubious assertions Zhirinovsky made in their closed-door meeting were: * 300 million Muslims are massing on Russia's southern border and could take over the country.
NEWS
January 26, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young man was intoxicated but on his feet when he left a billiards hall early Jan. 9. But he later awoke to find himself tumbling inside a moving garbage truck, dodging massive blades slowly grinding collected refuse into pulp. For 23 minutes, according to a transcript of a series of calls made on his cell phone to Moscow's 911 rescue service operators, 25-year-old Taras Shugayev pleaded and cried, saying he was being squeezed and begging for help.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of this remote Siberian city perched on permafrost are not paved with gold, but its long-neglected inhabitants say they should be. The Republic of Yakutia is the hard-currency engine of Russia's economy, the heart of its lucrative diamond industry, a wellspring of oil, the mother lode of its staggering riches of gold, platinum, copper and other metals.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rocket-propelled grenade fired across the busy Garden Ring Road at rush hour Wednesday blasted into the sixth floor of the U.S. Embassy in an attack by unknown assailants. No one was injured by the grenade that struck the stone exterior of the stately yellow-and-white building at 4:25 p.m., embassy spokeswoman Olivia Hilton said. The blast was absorbed by a large photocopying machine that shielded much of the interior from flying glass and fragments, she said.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1994 | BETH KNOBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bill Clinton slept there. So have members of Congress and chief executives of American companies. But Moscow's only American-run hotel is suddenly attracting more than famous guests. The Radisson Slavjanskaya is caught in a very public battle for control between its two partners, Irvine-based Americom Business Centers and hotel giant Radisson. Three years after its founding, the Americom-Radisson partnership has disintegrated into open bickering and dueling lawsuits.
WORLD
September 6, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a rainless summer and decades of misguided drainage work in this once-swampy countryside, fires have engulfed countless square miles of desiccated peat bog and cast a suffocating pall over nearby Moscow. Smoke from the slow-burning peat was so thick Thursday in the capital, 75 miles west of here, that its most revered landmarks were shrouded and drivers had to use headlights at noon.
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