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Mose Allison

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010
Regarded as "the William Faulkner of jazz," pianist and songwriter Mose Allison counts Elvis Costello, Van Morrison and Ray Davies among his legion of fans. Possessed with a honeyed voice and a humorist's eye for detail, Allison is midway through a six-city tour previewing the spring release of his first album in 12 years, "The Way of the World," produced by Largo favorite Joe Henry. Largo at the Coronet, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A. Sat.-Sun., 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $35. (310) 855-0350.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012
The Who will embark on the group's first North American tour in four years this fall with an arena presentation of the 1973 rock opera "Quadrophenia" in its entirety. The venerable British band, fronted by surviving original members Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey, also promises to survey other hits from the group's career on the new tour that opens Nov. 1 in Sunrise, Fla., and concludes Feb. 26 in Providence, R.I., with Southern California stops on Jan. 28 in Anaheim, Jan. 30 in Los Angeles and Feb. 5 in San Diego.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
Though Mose Allison is perhaps best known for his parched-voice renditions of such songs as Willie Dixon's "The Seventh Son," Hank Williams' "Hey, Good Loo" and Duke Ellington's "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," the pianist/singer has left a more indelible mark on the world of contemporary jazz as a composer whose some 100 songs often offer wry observations on modern life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010
THEATER Aga-Boom Laugh it up as the Aga-Boom clown troupe hits Long Beach to serve up its signature brand of messy, interactive fun. Get crazy as the wacky men in silly suits shoot streams of tissue paper into the audience, spray confetti and generally goof off with mime, poetry and avant-garde showmanship. Carpenter Performing Arts Center, 6200 Atherton St., Long Beach. 8 p.m. today, 2 p.m. Sun. $30. (562) 985-7000, www.carpenterarts.org. MUSIC Mamak Khadem Inspired by ancient Persian poetry and music, vocalist Mamak Khadem will kick off the 2010 season of the world music series "Sounds of L.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1999 | DON HECKMAN
Mention Mose Allison and most jazz fans will immediately respond with, "Yeah. 'Your Mind Is on Vacation' or 'Parchman Farm' or 'I'm Not Talking'!" His renderings of those--and many other--home-cooked, Southern-fried tunes have been Allison's stock in trade since the days when he was better known as a bop-tinged pianist than as a singer. Thursday night at the Jazz Bakery, in the opening performance of a four-night run, he delivered a stack of similar numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1987 | A. JAMES LISKA
If jazz is to ever have a poet laureate, it might well consider Mose Allison, the singer-pianist-composer who not only presents his own magically effusive lyrics in a unique and swinging style, but delivers the words and music of others in an equally effective manner.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | BILL LOCEY
Look in the dictionary under laid-back and you will probably see a picture of singer/piano player Mose Allison. If he was any mellower, we'd be checking his pulse. Allison, 62, is a jazz/blues hepcat who has been touring long enough to remember when the Cubs were good. He's like Maynard G. Krebs with a good job, a voice like smoke and about 30 albums.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005 | Richard Harrington, Washington Post
Is Mose Allison a bluesman who plays jazz piano or a jazz pianist who sings the blues? A songwriter or a song stylist? "I've slipped through all the categories, for sure," Allison, 77, says from his longtime Long Island, N.Y., home, though not longtime enough to have had the slightest effect on his rich Mississippi accent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | DIRK SUTRO
Mose Allison lives in Long Island, but he has the laid-back manner of a Southern Californian. Nothing seems to knock him from his mellow groove, not even the thought that his record company may have let him down. Allison, who brings his bluesy jazz vocals and piano to Elario's for two weeks beginning Wednesday, believes that "Ever Since the World Ended," released several months ago, is one of his best albums. But, Allison said, it hasn't received the best distribution.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Because jazz is a living art form, not subject to the age-driven considerations of pop music, the shelf life of a jazz career is a relative issue. Still, it's hard to believe that jazz song man Mose Allison has been twisting phrases and pushing around blues-bop piano licks for some 40 years. When Allison returns to Wheeler Hot Springs this Sunday for a concert, it will be in the shoes of a raconteur who qualifies as a living legend. Allison was born in Tippo, Miss.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010
Regarded as "the William Faulkner of jazz," pianist and songwriter Mose Allison counts Elvis Costello, Van Morrison and Ray Davies among his legion of fans. Possessed with a honeyed voice and a humorist's eye for detail, Allison is midway through a six-city tour previewing the spring release of his first album in 12 years, "The Way of the World," produced by Largo favorite Joe Henry. Largo at the Coronet, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A. Sat.-Sun., 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $35. (310) 855-0350.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005 | Richard Harrington, Washington Post
Is Mose Allison a bluesman who plays jazz piano or a jazz pianist who sings the blues? A songwriter or a song stylist? "I've slipped through all the categories, for sure," Allison, 77, says from his longtime Long Island, N.Y., home, though not longtime enough to have had the slightest effect on his rich Mississippi accent.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Mose Allison rarely wastes much time getting to the point in his performances. And his opening set at the Jazz Bakery on Tuesday was no exception. Starting out with a busily eccentric instrumental number (accompanied by bassist Tom Warrington), the singer and pianist shifted, without a break, into "I Don't Want Much," and continued virtually nonstop for the next 40 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mose Allison opened a weeklong-run at the Jazz Bakery in a retrospective mood Tuesday night. His latest recording, "The Mose Chronicles, Volume One," scheduled to be released Tuesday, is a collection of new renderings of some of his classic songs. And the Tuesday set was delivered in similar fashion, opening--as the album does--with an instrumental overture, then continuing with Allison originals and his covers of tunes by other composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1999 | DON HECKMAN
Mention Mose Allison and most jazz fans will immediately respond with, "Yeah. 'Your Mind Is on Vacation' or 'Parchman Farm' or 'I'm Not Talking'!" His renderings of those--and many other--home-cooked, Southern-fried tunes have been Allison's stock in trade since the days when he was better known as a bop-tinged pianist than as a singer. Thursday night at the Jazz Bakery, in the opening performance of a four-night run, he delivered a stack of similar numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998
Hey, Jon B! ("Stayin' Alive in the '90s," July 12) When, as a student in the late '60s, I was the only white dancer included in "Trade-Tech A-Go-Go" (at Los Angeles Trade Technical College), I, too, took some name-calling for my love of R&B music and culture. We all experienced amused shock, however, when it was discovered during rehearsals that "It's Not Unusual," sung by African American twin brothers in our show, was actually recorded by a white Brit soloist: Tom Jones. Although there are many shades of pale, let me add a few pop-jazz-blues singers to your blue-eyed soul list that already includes Michael McDonald.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Mose Allison rarely wastes much time getting to the point in his performances. And his opening set at the Jazz Bakery on Tuesday was no exception. Starting out with a busily eccentric instrumental number (accompanied by bassist Tom Warrington), the singer and pianist shifted, without a break, into "I Don't Want Much," and continued virtually nonstop for the next 40 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010
THEATER Aga-Boom Laugh it up as the Aga-Boom clown troupe hits Long Beach to serve up its signature brand of messy, interactive fun. Get crazy as the wacky men in silly suits shoot streams of tissue paper into the audience, spray confetti and generally goof off with mime, poetry and avant-garde showmanship. Carpenter Performing Arts Center, 6200 Atherton St., Long Beach. 8 p.m. today, 2 p.m. Sun. $30. (562) 985-7000, www.carpenterarts.org. MUSIC Mamak Khadem Inspired by ancient Persian poetry and music, vocalist Mamak Khadem will kick off the 2010 season of the world music series "Sounds of L.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
In the initial song on his new album, 66-year-old Mose Allison describes himself as a "certified senior citizen." But the Mississippi-born pianist and songwriter has always chosen to view the world through a somewhat whimsical prism. Snowy white beard and shiny pate to the contrary, Allison played an opening-night set at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday that was as energetically youthful as anything he's ever done.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Because jazz is a living art form, not subject to the age-driven considerations of pop music, the shelf life of a jazz career is a relative issue. Still, it's hard to believe that jazz song man Mose Allison has been twisting phrases and pushing around blues-bop piano licks for some 40 years. When Allison returns to Wheeler Hot Springs this Sunday for a concert, it will be in the shoes of a raconteur who qualifies as a living legend. Allison was born in Tippo, Miss.
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