Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMosul
IN THE NEWS

Mosul

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
February 1, 2009 | From a Special Correspondent
Hisham marched to the polls in Mosul eager for change -- the last four years had been disastrous. The line moved briskly and people smiled and laughed, desperately seeking a break with the recent bloody past. After Sunni Arabs boycotted elections in 2005, a Kurdish-led government had ruled this northern city and surrounding Nineveh province, and violence spiraled out of control. Hisham, an Iraqi Kurd, had watched as his city fell apart.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Ned Parker
BEIRUT - At least 41 people died Thursday on the third straight day of pitched fighting between Iraqi security forces and Sunni Arabs, as Prime Minister Nouri Maliki warned the country was in crisis. The national police battled back Sunni fighters in the northern city of Mosul, long a bastion of the insurgency, where individuals took up arms after security forces opened fire early Tuesday on an encampment of Sunni protesters in the city of Hawija in Kirkuk province. The violence this week ended four months of largely peaceful Sunni protests centered on the group's alleged mistreatment by Iraq's Shiite Muslim-led government.
Advertisement
WORLD
June 26, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A bombing at a bus station in a Shiite Muslim neighborhood in southwest Baghdad killed at least seven people, police said. It was the latest in a series of recent attacks that has left nearly 200 people dead in the run-up to a U.S. military withdrawal from Iraqi cities next Tuesday. Three other bombs and a mortar shell killed two more people around the capital. The U.S. military said nine American soldiers were wounded in two roadside bomb attacks against a convoy in east Baghdad. A roadside bomb also killed a man in the northern city of Mosul.
WORLD
January 16, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Salar Jaff, Los Angeles Times
Two American soldiers were killed when at least one Iraqi soldier opened fire at a military training base in northern Iraq, and a third soldier died in another incident, the U.S. and Iraqi military said Saturday. The violence highlighted the peril still facing U.S. forces in Iraq, with many armed groups eager to target the Americans before their scheduled withdrawal at the end of this year. Five U.S. soldiers have been killed in the first two weeks of the year, already matching the number of Americans killed in the last three months of 2010.
WORLD
December 31, 2004 | From Associated Press
Three militant groups warned Iraqis on Thursday against voting in the Jan. 30 election, saying that people who participated in the "dirty farce" risked attack. All 700 employees of the electoral commission in the northern city of Mosul reportedly resigned after being threatened. The warning came a day after insurgents in Mosul launched a coordinated assault on a U.S. military outpost. The military said 25 insurgents were believed to have been slain and one U.S. soldier was killed in the battle, which involved U.S. warplanes.
WORLD
May 19, 2003 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
As they eyed L. Paul Bremer III munching bread and patting children's heads along a busy sidewalk Sunday in this northern city, several Iraqis asked with amazement, "Is this our new American president?" Their surprise was understandable. In a nation where the face of Saddam Hussein was long ubiquitous, few citizens ever saw their president in person. A crowd of about 100 drew near to Bremer, and a middle-aged man kissed him on both cheeks. Another said in English, "We love you."
WORLD
September 14, 2008 | Tina Susman and Saif Rasheed, Times Staff Writers
The TV show is one of the country's most popular, a form of "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition" in which a TV crew surprises needy Iraqis with food and gifts during the holy month of Ramadan. On Saturday, as the Sharqiya TV personnel homed in on a family reeling from losses suffered in a massive bombing, kidnappers zeroed in on them. Hours later, three journalists and their driver were found dead, shot in the head and chest and dumped on the outskirts of Mosul, a northern city that has become one of the most violent in Iraq.
NEWS
May 6, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
A convention of religious, ethnic and tribal leaders chose a former Iraqi army general as Mosul's mayor Monday, making it the country's first major city with an elected government. About 150 delegates cast ballots to select an interim city council of 24 men, who then went behind closed doors and picked Ghanim Basso, 58, a former Iraqi army major general and longtime member of the now-deposed Baath Party, as interim mayor.
WORLD
August 8, 2009 | Liz Sly and Saif Hameed
A series of attacks largely targeting Shiite Muslims killed at least 52 people Friday, most of them in a powerful car bombing at a mosque on the northern edge of the volatile city of Mosul. Authorities said most of the 39 fatalities at the mosque were Shiite Turkmens, a minority group that has frequently been targeted by the Sunni Arab militant group Al Qaeda in Iraq to inflame sectarian and ethnic tensions. The massive bomb exploded as worshipers were leaving the mosque in the village of Shiraykhan after attending Friday prayers, officials said.
WORLD
August 11, 2009 | Liz Sly
A string of bombings in northern Iraq and Baghdad that have killed at least 112 people in the last several days, including 60 on Monday, has raised fears that insurgent groups are embarking on a sustained attempt to kindle ethnic and sectarian warfare. The toll since Friday represents the worst upsurge of violence since U.S. troops handed over security in urban areas to Iraqi security forces on June 30. The attacks serve as a reminder that although the U.S. military says it is on track to complete the withdrawal of U.S. combat forces from Iraq by next August, the potential for fresh conflict between Arabs and Kurds in the north, and Sunnis and Shiites elsewhere, remains very real.
WORLD
May 11, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Militants launched attacks on security forces and Shiite Muslim civilians across Iraq on Monday, killing nearly 100 people in a spree of shootings and bombings that rattled the country and worsened tensions among its political elite. At least 92 Iraqis were killed and more than 300 were injured. The number of dead and wounded rose steadily in the evening as reports trickled in from Mosul in the north, Basra in the far south and points in between. News channels broadcast familiar images of weeping women cloaked in black abayas , mangled vehicles and pools of water tinged with blood.
WORLD
December 25, 2009 | By Caesar Ahmed and Omar Hayali
The Judo family stayed away from Christmas Eve Mass in Baghdad. Because of recent sectarian violence in the capital and other areas of the country, they were worried that churches might be targeted by armed groups. By nightfall, their worst fears had been realized. Not only had a Christian been killed in the northern city of Mosul, but the Shiite Muslim holiday of Ashura, which this year begins one day after Christmas, had made the situation even more volatile: 27 people killed in attacks on Shiite neighborhoods.
WORLD
September 27, 2009 | Associated Press
A U.S. military drone crashed Saturday in northern Iraq, hitting a regional office of Iraq's largest Sunni political party in an area that remains an insurgent stronghold, an American military official said. The unmanned aerial vehicle crashed into the local office of the Iraqi Islamic Party in Mosul. The U.S. military identified the crashed drone as a Shadow model, which does not carry weapons and is routinely used in areas like Mosul to track insurgents planting explosives.
WORLD
September 11, 2009 | Omar Hayali and Ned Parker
A suicide truck bomber attacked a Kurdish village early today, killing at least 20 people and wounding 27 others in the latest attempt by militants to exploit northern Iraq's Arab-Kurdish factions. The truck detonated around midnight in the village of Wardek, home to Shiite Kurds, about 15 miles east of Mosul, according to a police officer. The explosion tore down homes and buried people in rubble, including women and children, the police officer said. A second assailant was shot by Kurdish forces in the area before he could detonate his own truck bomb, the police officer added.
WORLD
August 11, 2009 | Liz Sly
A string of bombings in northern Iraq and Baghdad that have killed at least 112 people in the last several days, including 60 on Monday, has raised fears that insurgent groups are embarking on a sustained attempt to kindle ethnic and sectarian warfare. The toll since Friday represents the worst upsurge of violence since U.S. troops handed over security in urban areas to Iraqi security forces on June 30. The attacks serve as a reminder that although the U.S. military says it is on track to complete the withdrawal of U.S. combat forces from Iraq by next August, the potential for fresh conflict between Arabs and Kurds in the north, and Sunnis and Shiites elsewhere, remains very real.
WORLD
August 8, 2009 | Liz Sly and Saif Hameed
A series of attacks largely targeting Shiite Muslims killed at least 52 people Friday, most of them in a powerful car bombing at a mosque on the northern edge of the volatile city of Mosul. Authorities said most of the 39 fatalities at the mosque were Shiite Turkmens, a minority group that has frequently been targeted by the Sunni Arab militant group Al Qaeda in Iraq to inflame sectarian and ethnic tensions. The massive bomb exploded as worshipers were leaving the mosque in the village of Shiraykhan after attending Friday prayers, officials said.
WORLD
October 13, 2008 | Ned Parker, Times Staff Writer
New violence against Christians in the northern city of Mosul has sparked an outcry from Iraq's religious minority. In the last week, local officials said, many Christian families have fled the city after coming under attack from Sunni Arab militants. Christians have been targeted along with other sects and ethnic groups since 2003. More than 900 Christian families have fled Mosul in the last week, said Jawdat Ismail, the director of the Ministry of Displacement and Migration in Nineveh province.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|