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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Pharrell Williams looked wiped out. Late on a recent evening, the singer-rapper-producer was shuttling between two studios at a Melrose Avenue recording complex. In one he was working on music for this spring's "The Amazing Spider-Man 2," which he's scoring along with Hans Zimmer; in the other he was supervising final mixes for his upcoming solo album. Now Ryan Seacrest's people had arrived to shoot Williams' cameo in a video, set to his song "Happy," marking the 10th anniversary of the radio host's popular morning show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986
Lawrence Christon did a good job of capturing the essence of director Paul Mazursky's Oakie Lecture at the Motion Picture Academy, but he misrepresented the gist of Mazursky's statement that "the industry is anti-Semitic" ("Comedy Award to Mazursky," Oct. 1). Mazursky did say that, but went on--very significantly--to explain that studio executives want to make movies for the masses and that they fear that something "very Jewish" will not play in Dallas. So, it's demographics, not bigotry, that he was referring to. I think Christon and The Times owe the readers, as well as Mazursky himself, the courtesy of being more accurate.
OPINION
February 19, 2002
It's wonderful to hear that the entertainment industry is giving animation "new respect" (Feb. 12). It has been 65 years since the first animated feature was recognized by the motion picture academy with an Oscar, but I guess critical respect takes time to build. It would also be wonderful if the industry would recognize the writers behind animated films and television programs with the same respect for professionalism that is paid to the writers of live action. Animation writers would like the same protections and benefits provided to live-action writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Director Brett Ratner resigned Tuesday as producer of the Oscar telecast after coming under fire for making an anti-gay slur, leaving the motion picture academy scrambling to cast a new team to helm the February award show. Ratner, director of popcorn films such as "Rush Hour" and the newly released "Tower Heist," was an unconventional choice for the job and was touted as someone who could shake up the program and bring more viewers and pizazz to the affair. Although the show's ratings have flagged recently, the Oscars remain one of the most-viewed broadcasts of the year, often second only to the Super Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Chinese media conglomerate the Dalian Wanda Group has donated $20 million to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences for its film museum. In recognition of the gift -- the museum's second-largest to date -- the museum's film history gallery will now be named the Wanda Gallery. The Dalian Wanda group owns AMC Theatres, and its head, Wang Jianlin, has said he wants to invest $10 billion in U.S. companies in the next decade. "The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures is a global cultural institution and the Dalian Wanda Group's support of the project speaks to the worldwide importance and the appeal of the movies," said museum campaign chair Bob Iger, chairman and chief executive of the Walt Disney Co. "Their gift to the academy museum is a huge boost to our efforts to design and build the world's leading movie museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2003
AS a member of the motion picture academy, I read with interest Patrick Goldstein's column about the decision to not send out screening copies of the movies this year ("Screeners: Behind the Ban," Oct. 7). I was fully prepared to chalk this up to "Things that I hate, over which I will silently fume," until I came to the quote that Jack Valenti thinks that we academy members are lazy. I have taken voting very seriously since I was old enough to see R-rated movies. Every year, I have sat in theaters, watching everything that is even remotely viable.
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